This Just Isn’t Coworking

, , , , , , | Working | August 9, 2017

(I’ve recently quit one retail job, for a better one with more hours and more pay thankfully, due to having several problems with the job. One of the major problems was that on weekends multiple coworkers were there to back me up if there was a line, and one coworker in particular ignored the customers. She would just talk to her friends that worked there, making a lot of the other cashiers upset. I’m working with her one Saturday afternoon, when I get a line of seven or eight customers. I call her over.)

Me: “Hey, [Coworker], I have a line here; can you help me out?”

Coworker: *ignores me, continues to talk to friend in nearby sales section*

Me: *to Supervisor* “Hey [Supervisor], can you call over [Coworker] to come help me out here? I just got two more people.”

Supervisor: “You know she won’t. It’s cool. I’ll help you out.”

(After patiently waiting a few minutes, I excuse myself while a customer digs through her purse to find her credit card.)

Me: *to Coworker* “EXCUSE ME! Can you please help me with the line and talk to your friend later? I’ve got ten people in line right now!”

Coworker: “Don’t talk to me like that! I’m your superior, and I will report you to management for being rude to me!”

Me: “You’re kidding, right? You’re not my superior, and you do realize there are security cameras in this store, right?”

Coworker: “Well…”

Me: “You were hired to be a cashier, right? You’re here working today, right? Help me out or just go home!”

Coworker: “Fine, but don’t expect me to help you out like this again!”

Me: “I expect you to help me every time there’s a line!”

(Coworker helped me out, with Supervisor smiling at me when I returned to ring up the rest of the customers in my line. Clearly she heard everything I said. I later went in the back and reported what happened to the manager, so the coworker didn’t try to make me look bad, even though I kind of raised my voice at one point. The manager told me the supervisor talked to them, and I was definitely in the right, and they commended me on properly excusing myself and not just abandoning my line to go and talk to the coworker. The supervisor told me Coworker got a final warning, and that she threw a fit over being yelled at by a coworker. I wasn’t scheduled with her after that, and I started my new job two weeks after. I’ve never been happier!)

Too Much Effort For A Keyboard Warrior

, , , , | Right | August 8, 2017

(This is a discussion I have with a listener on my station’s Facebook page.)

Listener: “You’re the worst radio DJ ever, and I’m going to do everything it takes to get you fired!”

Me: “In that case, you’ll need my boss’s phone number, so you complain about me directly to him. You can reach him at [Head Office’s phone number].”

Listener: “NO!  Complaining on Facebook is easier!”

I’ve Got A Ticket To Hide

, , | Working | August 7, 2017

(We communicate with one of our partners via an Internet portal where the IT support is provided by a separate company. This separate company relocated its office to India and since then its service has been appalling. I’ve been informed by another department that the website isn’t feeding back some data to us, so I send an email with all the details to open an incident ticket. An hour later I get this phone call.)

Me: “Hello, [Company]. [My Name] speaking.”

Caller: “Yes, hello this is [Caller] from [Partner’s IT company]. Can I speak to [Coworker (who does the same job as me)]?”

Me: “He’s not in, but I can help with your query.”

Caller: “Okay, I have an open incident ticket that [Coworker] opened last week; I need permission to close it.”

Me: “Close it? What is the nature of the incident ticket?”

Caller: “It’s [Exact same problem I’ve emailed about]. Can I close the ticket?”

Me: “I’ve just emailed you with that problem; is it fixed?”

Caller: “No, but I now have two tickets, which looks bad. Can I close one of them?”

Me: “So, the problem isn’t solved. You just want the tickets gone?”

Caller: “Yes, that’s correct.”

Me: *dumbfounded* “If I allow you to cancel one ticket does that mean the work will still be done to fix the issue?”

Caller: “I don’t know… Maybe.”

Me: *just wanting the shift over* “Fine, cancel the first ticket but keep mine active. We need this issue fixed!”

Caller: *click*

(They actually just hung up. This was seven months ago and the issue still isn’t fixed along with several others. Every time we open a ticket they call up to cancel it as opposed to fixing the problem. Sadly, we can’t just terminate the relationship.)

The Answer Is Always 42

, , , , | Working | June 25, 2017

(A little bit of backstory: I receive a phone from my parents for Christmas one year. As part of the gift, they agree to pay the contract for the first two years (the length of the contract), at which point it will be transferred to me. However, I go away to university in this time, so we set up with the company that I have the authorisation to speak on behalf of my father in case there are any issues while I am away from home.)

Me: “Hi, I’m having a problem with my account. It’s under [Father], but I should be on your system as having authorisation to speak on his behalf? My name is [My Name].”

Customer Service Rep: “Okay, yes, I see, ma’am. That is absolutely fine. We will require the answer to the account holder’s security question in order to continue, though.”

(I know the answers that my father would give to most standard security questions; however, since the account was set up in my absence, I don’t know which question he set.)

Me: “Okay, that should be fine. Can you tell me what the question is?”

Customer Service Rep: “No.”

Me: “…why not?”

Customer Service Rep: “You are not the account holder.”

Me: “But I have the authority to speak in his stead. You’ve already said that your system acknowledges that.”

Customer Service Rep: “I cannot divulge that information.”

Me: “But… look, it’s not as if I’m asking for a hint, or for you to tell me the answer. I’m asking for the question. That information is useless without the answer.”

Customer Service Rep: “I can’t tell you.”

Me: *giving up* “I’ll get in touch with my father and call you back.”

(He couldn’t remember which question he’d used either. Luckily, my mother could.)

Never A Fan Of People Who Like Walls (Of Text)

, , , , , | Learning | June 25, 2017

(I’m a girl and a senior. I’m taking a class with a professor I’ve had previously. I get put in a project group with three men who are juniors. We are getting ready for our final presentation when I discover that one of the men has altered our PowerPoint. He and I have butted heads all semester, as I know how the professor likes projects done, and he does not believe me.)

Me: “[Classmate #1], did you mess with my slides?”

Classmate #1: “I didn’t like your slides, so I fixed them!”

(My slides were previously short bullet points. They are now a massive wall of text.)

Me: “Dude. Dr. [Professor] always says not to put a ton of text on our slides. He wants to us to tell him about our project. He doesn’t want to read a bunch of slides. The PowerPoint is there to enhance our parts, not take them over.”

Classmate #1: “You keep saying that, but I don’t think you’re right!”

Me: “I’ve had Dr. [Professor] for two other classes, and that’s always what he says. And he means it!”

Classmate #2: “HEY! You edited my slides, too!”

Classmate #1: “Yours didn’t have enough text either! Just those graphs!”

Classmate #2: “[My Name] has had Dr. [Professor] multiple times, so we should listen to her.”

Classmate #1: “FINE. I’ll put them all back the way they were, but I’m leaving all the text on mine. I know what I’m doing. All my past professors love the level of detail in my presentations!”

Me: “Whatever, [Classmate #1]. But make sure you tell him that you did your own slides.”

Classmate #1: “Of course I will!” *smirks*

(A couple days later, we’ve just finished our presentation, and are waiting on feedback.)

Professor: “[My Name], nice job on the intro and setup of your group’s findings. You always do very well at that. [Classmates #2 and 3], the graphs and charts were a great touch, and really added value to the presentation. [Classmate #1], I sense your enthusiasm, and your research was great, but your slides were a wall of text. Nobody wants to sit there and read slides.”

Classmate #1: “But—”

Professor: “Overall, very well researched and thought out. Nice job!”

Classmate #1: *turns to me as we’re walking to our seats* “You should’ve warned me!”

Me: “I DID, several times! You didn’t listen! Just like you haven’t listened the whole semester!”

(I heard the professor snort and start chuckling. Classmate #1 stomped back to his seat.)

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