Right Working Romantic Related Learning Friendly Healthy Legal Inspirational Unfiltered

Teaching You New Words To This Day

, , , | Romantic | July 6, 2017

(I’m playing on my laptop one night, doing non-work things, with my husband near by when I start to get frustrated.)

Me: “Oh, poopy butt!”

Husband: *laughs* “And that’s how you know you’re a teacher!”

Dancing Until You Cry

, , , , , , , | Hopeless | June 29, 2017

(There is a great local band here that is hired by a couple of outdoor venues several times a year. They play 50s, 60s, and 70s rock and have a very large following. At their concerts, the audience ranges from 2 to 95 and a huge percentage of the audience will get on the dance floor at some point. My daughter has some cognitive disabilities but absolutely loves rock music and dancing. She will recruit random strangers to dance if a song begins that she particularly likes. At one concert, we are sitting in the middle instead of up front. A good song comes on, my daughter hops up and grabs the hand of the elderly man sitting beside her. I try to pull her back at first but the woman sitting on the other side of the man waves me away with a smile. The gentleman obliges and they both begin to dance in the aisle. The woman scoots over to me.)

Woman: “I’ve been trying to get dad to dance all evening. Your daughter has quite a touch.”

Me: “She’s hard to say no to. He doesn’t have to dance to the whole song. I can rescue him in a minute.”

Woman: “That’s fine. He is slipping away from us. He’s always loved music so we came out tonight. He’s been enjoying himself. He’s smiling more tonight than I’ve seen in long time.”

(The song ends and the woman and I get up to collect our dancers. The man put up his hand.)

Man: “Wait. One more.”

(He took my daughter’s hand and they danced to the next song, too, both smiling ear to ear. I looked over at the woman and she was wiping away tears. That made me tear up.)

Me: “Look what you’ve started!”

Woman: “Your daughter is an angel! I can’t tell you what it means to me to see dad not only smiling but dancing.”

(Our dancers finally sat down but they held hands for most of the rest of the concert. My daughter gave her partner a hug at the end of the night and his daughter hugged me so tightly I thought I’d lose my breath. I haven’t seen them at a concert since but I always look. My daughter still grabs strangers to dance with. People hardly ever say no.)


This story is part of the Sons And Daughters roundup! This is the last story in the roundup, but we have plenty of others you might enjoy!

23 Reasons Why Your Mother Is Awesome – And Why You Should Call Her!

 

Read the next Sons And Daughters roundup story!

Read the Sons And Daughters roundup!

Their Heart Just Isn’t In It

, , , | Working | June 19, 2017

CONTENT WARNING: This story contains content of a medical nature. It is not intended as medical advice.

(I work at a hotel on the night shift. Tonight, about 20 minutes into my shift, my security guard radios telling us he needs an ambulance to the staff break-room — for himself. We call right away, but he stops responding on the radio and we don’t know exactly what the issue is.)

Emergency Operator: “What is the problem he’s experiencing?”

Coworker: “Well, we’re not sure; he’s at the back of the hotel and we’re at the front, but he has had some documented medical issues recently.”

Emergency Operator: “Well, I need you to go to where he is, and call me again from there with details.”

Coworker: “Okay.”

(She hangs up, and is about to start walking back, but barely gets five feet before one of the housekeeper’s radios again saying that the guard is having a heart attack. Not wanting to waste a moment, I tell my coworker to keep going but call for an ambulance again immediately.)

Me: “I’m calling from [Hotel]; our security guard is having a heart attack!”

Emergency Operator: “Okay, well, is he sitting up or laying down?”

Me: *thinking that the way this transaction should have gone was ‘I say heart attack, you say ambulance’* “What? I don’t know! I’m not where he is right now!”

Emergency Operator: *sounding annoyed* “I told the other girl that she needed to call me from where he is.”

Me: “Yeah, I know, but then we were told he is HAVING A HEART ATTACK! It’s a big hotel! I didn’t want to waste the time of her getting back there!”

(I actually had to radio to the back and get my coworker to tell me things like whether he was breathing and what position he was in before she’d send me an ambulance. Thankfully they got there in time — and yes, it was confirmed to definitely have been a heart attack!)

Muscling Up A Comeback

, , , , | Right | June 15, 2017

(It is near the end of my shift and my coworker has arrived to relieve me. As she’s putting her money in her register a guest approaches the counter.)

Guest: “Do you have a holding service?”

Me: “What’s that?”

Guest: “A holding service.” *he motions to the coat on his arm* “You know, some place I could leave this?”

Me: “Oh! No, sorry, sir; not here.”

Guest: “Aw, but this coat is heavy!”

Coworker: “Think how we feel carrying our purses around!”

Guest: “Yeah, but you ladies come equipped with something that helps you carry them.”

Me: *without missing a beat, I cheerily chirp back* “So do you. They’re called muscles.”

This Day Took A Turn At The Turnpike

, , , , | Working | May 25, 2017

Every year in the month of May, a particular venue in my state has a Renaissance Festival that is open every weekend of that month. My partner and I decide to take our twin boys this year, as we haven’t been able to attend for several years.

The drive is about an hour on the turnpike, and we are four miles from our exit when our engine overheats and we have to pull off to the side of the road. When I pop the hood, white smoke emerges from the engine in a very impressive plume.

I try to call our roommate, but get no answer, so I start looking up tow trucks and mechanics on my phone. My partner is pretty upset, as we had been planning the trip for weeks, and the twins are starting to fuss because they are realizing we won’t be able to attend.

I call a tow company in the town we were heading to and they say that they could come to get us, but no mechanic in town is open on a Sunday. I thank them, then manage to find a mobile mechanic all the way back in our hometown, almost an hour away.

As I am talking to the mechanic, I notice a vehicle pull to the side of the road ahead of us and a woman get out. She’s walking back in our direction, so I go to meet her. She hands me a gallon jug of water and said she had noticed us and was worried we would overheat. She checks to see if we have somebody coming for us and I reassure her that a mechanic is on the way. I thank her and she gives me a quick hug, then goes on her way.

I take the water back to the car, where my sons are extremely grateful for it, as they had finished off the drinks we had brought for the trip. We settle in to wait for the mechanic, who, on arrival, sets to work.

While he is working, a Highway Patrol Officer pulls up behind our car. I look at my partner in confusion, then to the mechanic, who glances toward the police car and asks if we had called for one. We both shake our head and pretty soon the trooper emerges and comes up to ask if we’re okay or need any help. I explain that we’re having car trouble, but the mechanic is here with us and a kind woman has given us water already, so we are in no danger. Once he is sure that we are safe, he lets us know to call him if we need him, then goes back to his car and sets off.

It turns out that our thermostat is bad, so he replaces that and adds new coolant to the engine, but when we turn it on again, it almost immediately overheats. He spends nearly an hour trying to figure out what is wrong before we all finally have to accept that he can’t fix it. I pay him for his services, but before he leaves he insists on following our car to the rest stop down the road to make sure we get somewhere cool where we can sit.

As this is going on, my partner is posting to his Facebook in frustration about the situation. Our roommate’s boyfriend spots the post. He offers to come and pick us up, even though we know he is very short on gas money due to having a tight financial situation.

The mechanic follows us to the rest stop and has me stay on the phone with him while we get there so that I can update him on the engine. Once we arrive at the rest stop, he comes inside with us and waits to make certain we have a ride back to town before he is willing to leave us.

My partner goes ahead and gets food for us and I call the tow company from before. It turns out that they suspected we would need to call them back, so they already had the information I had given them earlier, and were able to dispatch a driver pretty quickly.

The driver picks me and our car up, but offers to stay until our friend arrives to pick up my partner and the twins, not wanting to leave them stranded. We reassure him that it will be fine, so he sets out for the almost hour drive back to our house. The whole time he and I chat about cars, customers, and other things, including how it would probably be an ‘easy fix’ for my car and that I shouldn’t worry.

When he drops me and the car off at our house and I pay him, I also thank him profusely, especially for having been willing to make such a long drive. He reassures me that it is all part of the job and that he had enjoyed chatting with me, then heads on his way.

About an hour later my partner, my kids, and our roommate and her boyfriend arrive. I offer to go with him and fill up his tank in thanks, but he turns me down, saying it is fine and he knows we would have done the same for him. I still manage to get him to take a ten dollar pre-paid gas card, but only after quite a bit of insistence on my part.

To the kind woman, the kind mechanic, the kind Highway Patrol Officer, the kind tow truck driver, and our roommate and her boyfriend, if you’re reading this and remember a blue PT Cruiser stranded on the turnpike, I want to say thank you from the bottom of my heart. You made a day that could have been so much worse turn out a lot better for a gay couple and their kids.