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Buy Direct Or Get Wrecked

, , , , | Right | November 25, 2021

I work in customer service, where the customer will contact us if they have any issues with their online orders.

This customer called us because they had a complaint about a pair of shoes they had ordered. The shoes on the website were, of course, good-looking and new. The customer had not only gotten the wrong pair but they were also used to the point that you could only throw them out; they sent us pictures later.

The customer was understandably not happy about this and demanded to get compensated. Now the fun started.

When I asked for an order number, the customer provided one that was definitely not used in our system. After a bit more information, I found out that the customer had not even ordered it from our website, but from a scam website, which had used part of our name and our company’s address to seem as if it was a sister company to ours.

The customer was not happy about this answer but would take a look at it from the “company” they had ordered from.

I thought this was the end of it, but boy, was I wrong.

Over the next few weeks, the customer contacted us on a regular basis via email (mostly) regarding these shoes from our “sister company”. They had apparently been in contact with the scammers and demanded compensation. The scammers responded that the customer could get a partial refund or similar but never a full refund.

And because of that, the customer returned to us, since we apparently had to deal with our “sister company”.

Their reasoning was that since the scammers were using our company’s address and other information, then this was our responsibility and we should pay the customer back for the money lost. The customer backed their logic up with the fact that their husband was a lawyer and he had said this was correct.

Each and every time the customer demanded us to pay back for their own mistake, they got the same answer (just worded slightly more politely): “Sorry for this, but no, we are not responsible for you making an order on a scam website.”

After a long enough time, I think the customer got the message that we neither could nor would help them with something that wasn’t a mistake on our side. And there was no way we could have done anything about the scammer’s website. I did ask my bosses about this a few times.

I have no idea if the customer ever got their money back, but I think that’s highly unlikely.

How To Turn The Financial World Upside Down

, , , | Right | November 25, 2021

A customer has called us to get help with paying for their order. My coworker is helping them. The customer then has to enter their card number and security number, but they have problems finding the security number.

Coworker: “Could you please turn your card over? It should be there.”

It’s quiet for a while.

Customer: “Oh, no. Now everything is upside-down!”

Location, Location, Location

, , , | Right | November 22, 2021

I work for an online shop. The customers make an account, make their order, and get info via email. If they have questions or an issue, they can contact us online or via phone.

My coworker is helping an older customer with an order. They are having issues since it didn’t go through.

Coworker: “Where are you right now?”

They mean to ask where in the ordering process the customer is.

Customer: “Well, I’m at home. Do you think that might be the reason for my issue?”

Yes, my coworker was at fault here for not being clearer, but it was a bit funny that the customer thought their physical location was the reason that they had an issue with their online order. It had nothing to do with the customer’s Internet connection, but they were able to get the order through after a while.

Once In Tech Support Always In Tech Support

, , , | Right | November 19, 2021

For seventeen years, starting in the mid-1980s, I worked in adult education. Among other things, I taught people how to use computers.

One evening, I received a phone call at home.

Me: “[My Name] talking.”

Caller: “Yeah, hi. I don’t think you remember me, but I took one of your classes a year and a half ago. My uncle recently bought a computer and he has a problem.”

Me: “I’m sorry, but I can’t help you there. I suggest your uncle contact the place where he bought the computer, or if it is a software problem, the company making that software.”

I had already learned that if you help someone with a computer problem, anything going wrong with that computer from then on would most likely be considered your problem. On top of that, I could not see how the caller thought it was appropriate to call me in a situation like that.

This was the exact moment I decided to get an unlisted phone number.

From A Different Q Continuum

, , , | Right | October 21, 2021

A customer calls and they have a voucher that they want to use for an online order.

Caller: “The voucher doesn’t work! There’s some weird sign on it that doesn’t exist on any keyboard. It couldn’t be a letter, since it doesn’t exist in any alphabet we know about.”

The unknown thing? The letter Q.

We spoke the same language, they sounded maybe a bit older than me, and I got them to read the rest of the voucher up.

After the call, I thought that they had maybe never really used the letter Q in capital, only in lower case. But still… the letter Q doesn’t exist in any alphabet?