Unfiltered Story #156869

, | | Unfiltered | July 7, 2019

{Overheard one side of a call from a claims officer}

I’m… sorry? Ma’am, who do you think is bugging your house?
{pause}
Have you thought about getting new phones?
{pause}
Well, that’s terrible news but I’m sorry I can’t help you with that. I’ll have to transfer you now.

At Least Say Hello Before Becoming A Victim Of Identity Fraud

, , , , | | Right | June 27, 2019

(I work at an insurance company in Canada and we service ONLY Canada. There is a bank in the southern United States that has accidentally printed our customer service number on their debit cards. Our numbers are only one number different, so once I explain to the client what the bank’s ACTUAL number is there usually isn’t an issue. But sometimes the client just doesn’t “get it,” and there are phone calls like this all the time.)

Me: “Thank you for calling [Insurance Company]. How can I help you?”

Bank Customer: *in a heavy Southern accent* “Hi. I just used my card at a [Pharmacy Chain] and it was declined; can you tell me why this happened?”

Me: “Sorry, are you trying to reach [Bank]?”

Bank Customer: “Yes… This is [Bank] that I’m speaking with!”

Me: “Sorry for the inconvenience, but [Bank] accidentally printed the wrong number on their card. Their actual number is [number], so just make sure you’re dialing an eight instead of a six.”

Bank Customer: “But I’m calling the number on the back of my card… It says this is the customer service number.”

Me: “Yes, I understand. It’s just that there was a misprint, and they accidentally put our number on their card. We are not your bank; we’re a Canadian insurance company.”

Bank Customer: “Well… I’m calling [our number].”

Me: “Yes, you are, and that is not your bank’s number; their number is [bank number].”

Bank Customer: “Okay… I’ll try again. I just called the number on the card…”

(I have also received this call many times:)

Me: “Thank you for calling [Insurance Company]; how can I help you?”

Bank Customer: “My Social Security number is—“

Me: “Sir! Please don’t tell me that information! This is not [Bank]!”

(Who STARTS a call with their SSN, anyway?)

Blame Kitt

, , , , | | Right | June 5, 2019

(I am an insurance agent, calling a potential customer back to clarify some information so I can prepare an auto insurance quote for her.)

Me: “Hello. I am calling regarding the claim from March of last year. Can you please verify if you were at fault or not at fault for this accident?”

Customer: “Well, I pulled over to the side of the road, and then I backed into a pole. But my car’s back-up sensor did not go off and didn’t warn me, so it wasn’t my fault.”

Me: “I’m sorry, but you would be deemed at fault for that accident, in that case.”

Customer: “But it didn’t warn me! It didn’t do what it was supposed to do! My car has a sensor and it beeps when I am going to hit something. It didn’t beep, so it’s not my fault. And I didn’t get a ticket!”

Me: “I understand what you’re saying about the sensor not going off. Unfortunately, you’re still responsible for being aware of your surroundings. We’re going to have to quote this with an at-fault accident on the record.”

Customer: “I just don’t understand how it’s my fault. It’s my car’s fault.”

Unfiltered Story #153714

, , , | | Unfiltered | June 3, 2019

(I work for a counter fraud department within a large well known insurance company, primarily my job consists of investigating new policies and looking for any signs that might link to fraud, fraud rings, ghostbrokers etc and validating the information on new policies, however sometimes we do take an occasional call from a policy holder who’s file we investigated)

Caller: Hi, my policy was cancelled by you and my new insurer is looking for proof of no claims, I should have 11 years?

Me: Alright let me have a look for you.

(I check his file and notice we confirmed with his last insurer  that he left them with 9 years and was with us for a year so he is entitled to 10)

Me: Okay sir, I can send you an email confirming 10 years no claims discount is that okay?

Caller: No I have 11! I had 9 with [Last insurers name] and have been with you for a whole year so 11!

Me: No sir that would be 10 years no claims discount…

Caller: *In an belittling tone* Please explain to me how you are coming up with this calculation because I did the maths and you owe me 11 years no claims discount!

Me: Certainly sir, well 1 + 1 is 2 yes?

Caller: Yes..

Me: And when you add 1 to another number that number becomes 1 more than it already is yes?

Caller: Yes?…

Me: Therefore 9 + 1 is 10, I’ll send out the email within the next 24hrs.

Caller: Oh, okay.. Uhm.. *Click*

They Don’t “Do” Paying

, , , , | | Healthy | May 28, 2019

(I used to work for a medical insurance company. I answered phone calls and emails from customers who had questions about their insurance policy or reimbursements. In this case, the customer had a coverage of 80%, meaning that he had to pay for 20% of the amount himself. The following is an exchange over email.)

Customer: “I saw that 80% of my invoice was paid, but what do I have to do about the remaining balance?”

Me: “The coverage for this type of expense is 80%. This means that we have paid for 80% of your expenses to the hospital directly. The other 20% should be paid by you, yourself.”

Customer: “I don’t understand. What do I have to do?”

Me: “Since the coverage is not at 100%, this means that we cannot pay for 100%. We have paid our share to the hospital. The remaining balance of [amount] should be paid to the hospital by you, yourself. If you have already paid this to the hospital, everything is fine and no further action is required. If you want, you can give me a phone call or provide me with your phone number, so I can give you a call, so I can explain this to you by phone.”

Customer: “I really don’t understand. What do you want me to do?”

(He has given me no phone number and no other option than to send another email.)

Me: “The amount of [amount] has to be paid to the hospital by you, yourself. If you have already paid [amount] to the hospital, you should do nothing. If you have not yet paid [amount] to the hospital, you need to pay [amount] to the hospital. If you are unsure whether you have paid or not, please contact the hospital’s billing department.”

Customer: “I am [Customer]’s manager and I have been over these emails with him. We both do not understand what he needs to do.”

(Again, I was given no phone number. At that point, I decided to break the rules and put the email back in the general mailbox instead of my personal one to let someone else deal with it. The worst part is that these people work for the United Nations.)

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