Kindness Knows No Language Barrier

, , , , , | Hopeless Right | January 10, 2019

I’m a customer in a pharmacy in Berlin, behind an older man. I don’t speak German as I’m just a tourist, but he is very obviously driving the cashier crazy, pointing to everything five times and asking the price, wasting her time by debating the price, raising his voice, and flailing his arms about. Even though I can’t understand a word he is saying, his rudeness is clear! The cashier is doing a great job of staying calm, but he is visibly upsetting her.

When he finally leaves — some five minutes later, only having purchased one thing — I approach the register, smile, and roll my eyes. As she serves me, she chats away about the customer — made obvious from the things she points to while talking — and it’s clear from the relief on her face that she just needs to unload on someone who understands. I smile and nod and laugh when she laughs, and say, “Ja,” a couple of times, and she seems much calmer and happy by the end of the transaction.

Dear cashier, even though I didn’t understand a word you said, our conversation was wonderful and friendly; we both speak the universal language of “hating bad customers”!

Driving Home The Kindness, Part 15

, , , , | Hopeless | January 9, 2019

A few years ago I was working at a dealership for a manufacturer that produces notoriously terrible cars. Our service department was open on Christmas Eve, though with shorter hours than normal. I was hoping to get out a bit extra-early — which I did! — we booked light, but of course, we kept hoping that unexpected cars wouldn’t show up. Around noon, a car without an appointment pulled into the driveway, and when I saw who was getting out I thought, “Crap! Why is she here?”

She was a customer I knew well: an older Russian lady who was perfectly nice, but paranoid and oversensitive about her car. We’d had quite a few occurrences of her coming for “symptoms” that were not, in fact, actual issues but just the normal operation of a crappy sort of car. Helping her also tended to be rather time-consuming as English was not her first language. I was dreading finding out why she had pulled in.

She came to bring me a box of chocolates and thank me for being so helpful to her over the past year, taking the time to explain her car’s idiosyncrasies and make her feel safe driving it. She said she knew she could be difficult, but that she really appreciated knowing that I was there to help her out and keep her mind at ease.

The gesture had a big impact: I’d been getting jaded, but she really helped me remember why I love my job, and how even the frustrating moments can be part of a rosier big picture. I continued to work with her, but dreaded seeing her far less as I was able to remember how our visits could be rewarding for both her and me. A year and a half later, when her lease ended and she turned the car in, she brought me her favorite snack from her home country, gave me a big tearful hug, and told me if the car wasn’t so terrible she would’ve bought out the lease so she could keep coming to see me for service. I don’t know what she’s driving now, but I hope it’s taking good care of her!

Related:
Driving Home The Kindness, Part 14
Driving Home The Kindness, Part 13
Driving Home The Kindness, Part 12

Gushing With Kindness

, , , , | Hopeless | January 7, 2019

(I’m a minor working the closing shift at a grocery store. Around 30 minutes before closing, a customer comes through my line with a box of Gushers candy. I’m tired, but I still try to be nice and make small talk.)

Me: “Wow, I haven’t had Gushers in a long time. I still love them, though!”

Customer: “Do you want some?”

Me: “A-are you sure?”

(He has already started to open the box.)

Customer: “Yeah, why not?”

Me: “Oh, no, it’s fine! You don’t have to.”

(He proceeds to put two bags of Gushers on the counter.)

Customer: “There’s one, and there’s two.”

Me: “Thank you so much!”

(He quickly left the store. Later, my friend from customer service came over and I gave one of the Gusher bags to her. That guy really made my night! If you’re reading this, thank you!)

The Top Rated Posts Of 2018!

| Friendly Healthy Hopeless Learning Legal Related Right Romantic Working | January 7, 2019

Dear readers,

It’s time to reveal the twenty highest-rated stories from 2018!

 

20 – Playing Unfair With The Fairer Sex
19 – That Is “Pretty” Awesome, Part 2
18 – Bagged Far More Than He Bargained For
17 – The Cake Price Is A Lie
16 – The Bosses Need To Clean Up Their Act
15 – Brunch Time Crunch Time
14 – There’s No Business Like None Of Your Business
13 – Getting Owned By The Owner, Part 11
12 – Dusting Off The Scum
11 – Fart Jokes Exist In A Vacuum
10 – Goodbye Fighting, Hello Kitty
9 – Mouse Versus Evil
8 – Must Be Friends With Aaron Schlossberg
7 – Man, What A Wait!
6 – This Prank Has A Drinking Problem
5 – The Best Comeback Since Sliced Bread
4 – Treat It Like A Boss
3 – Has The Authority To Tell You How It Is
2 – A Reversal Of Fortune
1 – The Adventures Of Captain Camp And Mother Russia

 

Do you have a favorite story from 2018 that didn’t make the top twenty? Don’t worry; you can still push to give it an honorable mention by telling us your best story here.

Passed Out From The Kindness

, , , , | Hopeless | January 5, 2019

(I’m working the closing shift with another coworker when suddenly an elderly lady passes out cold on one of our tables. Some other customers are with her immediately and I call an ambulance right away. I help by grabbing blankets and something to drink as soon as she is conscious again and the ambulance takes her to the hospital. Through all that, some customers stay by her side and tell the paramedics what happened, so she can receive the care she needs. Fast forward three weeks. I’ve been wondering a few times what might have happened to that lady, but I’ve accepted I’ll probably never get to know. I arrive to start my shift one day and see a lady who seems quite familiar standing by a coworker. My coworker greets me and tells me the lady wants to talk to me.)

Elderly Lady: “I don’t know if you remember me, but I’m [Elderly Lady], the woman who passed out here a few weeks ago. I got out of the hospital yesterday and I wanted to stop by and thank you. Thanks to your fast reaction, I’m still here today.”

(She proceeds to tell me that the doctors found an issue with her heart as the reason for her passing out. It needed immediate treatment, which she then received. I tell her what actually happened because she couldn’t really remember.)

Elderly Lady: “I remember another woman kneeling next to me, holding my head and such. Do you happen to know her?”

Me: “No, I’m sorry. That was another customer, and she left when you were taken care of. All I did was call an ambulance, really. Anything else was done by other customers and the paramedics.”

Elderly Lady: “And this was more than I could expect already. Thank you. Will you tell me your name?”

(I gave her my name and told her the name of my coworker, who was there, too. She wrote both of our names down. We talked for a few more minutes until I had to start my shift. She thanked me again and left. Fast forward another two weeks. Once more I arrived at work, this time to find a nicely-wrapped gift with my name on it. Inside was a box of chocolates and a card from the elderly lady, in which she thanked me once more and said how much it meant to her. My coworker got a gift, too. We’re still waiting to see the lady return so we can finally thank her for the gifts. Seeing the lady go the extra mile just because I did what should be common courtesy totally restored my faith in humanity.)

Page 2/20012345...Last