The Key Is Politeness

, , , | Right | October 17, 2018

(I work at an arcade and bar that closes at 2:00 am on the weekends. At 1:30, two women approach me.)

Woman: “Has anyone returned any keys to you?”

Me: “No, no one has. But lost and found is up at the front; you can go check there.”

Woman: “I was over there, and the girl there was really rude to me! She said they only do cleaning in the morning, and no one is going to look after we’ve closed.”

Me: “I’m sorry about that. Do you want to write down your number? We can call you if we find them.”

Woman: *rudely* “Yeah, but then how will I get home?”

Me: “Right. Well, I hope you find them.”

(I go back to my closing duties, because there’s nothing else I can do. I don’t hear exactly what she says, but she mumbles something to her friend and I hear the word “manager.” I turn back around and give her the biggest smile I can fake.)

Me: “Oh, would you like a manager?”

Woman: *rudely* “Um, yeah!”

Me: “Oh, I didn’t realize. One moment!”

(I call my manager over and he talks to her, telling her the same thing both my coworker and I did: we’re not going to search the building for her keys, and that her items are not the store’s responsibility. Twenty minutes later, I decide to go over to the front desk and see what really happened and if the woman found her keys.)

Me: “Were you the one talking to the woman who lost her keys?”

Coworker: “Yeah, she asked if she should wait around until we close, and I told her we do cleaning in the morning, and she gave me an attitude.”

Me: “Yeah, she was rude to me, too. Did she find her keys?”

Coworker: “Yeah, some guy found them on the ground outside and brought them in. I was so tempted to just throw them in the trash.”

Me: “I would have wanted to, too.”

Prescribing Them Some Anti-Mean Pills

, , , , | Right | October 8, 2018

(I work at a pharmacy as a technician. We have the ability to request certain prescription refills for patients at the doctor’s discretion. Notes appear on a patient’s profile when we make requests, giving us the status of the request — waiting for response, denied, or approved. It usually takes two or three days to hear back from a doctor, so we generally make the requests within a week or two of when the patient will be out of medication to avoid issues with insurance companies filling too soon. It is about nine in the morning on a weekday when a middle-aged man walks up to the pickup counter:)

Me: “Hi. Welcome to [Pharmacy]. How can I help?”

Customer #1: “I’m here to pick up a prescription.”

(I take his name and birthdate to pull up his profile. There are no prescriptions ready, but there is a note that we’ve sent a request to a doctor for a refill.)

Me: “It appears that you don’t have any prescriptions ready, sir, but we did send out a request to your doctor for a refill of [Prescription].”

Customer #1: “Yes, I know that. I was here yesterday and you guys told me the exact same thing. I have to drive a long way to get here. Why isn’t it ready yet?”

Me: “Well, it often takes a couple of days for a doctor to respond. Are you out of medication?”

(Occasionally, we will give patients a few extra pills if we’re having issues reaching the doctor, and they’re entirely out of medication. The customer gets angrier.)

Customer #1: “Why hasn’t it been filled yet? He always responds quickly! Haven’t you checked your messages yet? What kind of place is this?”

(At nine in the morning, not all doctor’s offices in our area are even OPEN, let alone writing prescriptions. We usually recommend calling in the afternoon to hear back from doctors.)

Me: “I’m sorry, sir, but the doctor still hasn’t sent us the refills yet. If you really need the medication, you can try calling the doctor’s office, as well.”

(This sometimes does help to speed up a doctor’s refills and authorizations, and we reach out to the patient to tell them if we don’t hear back in three days of a request to recommend getting in touch with the doctor. This also causes a note on a profile, which is not on this customer’s profile.)

Customer #1: “Why do I need to call the doctor when that’s clearly your job?”

(At this point I’m shocked speechless in anger. It takes me a few seconds to recover.)

Me: “You could also call us to make sure we have the prescription before coming.”

Customer #1: “You people never pick up the phone! I always end up on hold when I call.”

(The customer walks away, muttering about how we never have the prescriptions ready and don’t know what we’re doing. The customer behind him, who was waiting for her prescriptions to be refilled, has heard the whole exchange, and is equally as shocked at this guy.)

Customer #2: “Wow… I don’t know how you can put up with someone like that; I couldn’t handle being yelled at by someone with an attitude.”

Me: “Unfortunately, that’s not the worst of it. Sometimes they’re even meaner.”

Customer #2: “I’m sorry. I hope you don’t have any more like him today.”

(She was very polite throughout the rest of the exchange, and whatever upset I was feeling at the first customer was erased by her. She made my day. Whoever you are, thank you; I needed it.)

Masculinity So Small It Can Fit In A Purse

, , , | Right | October 8, 2018

(I’m at the host stand at the end of the night, so it’s not busy. A man walks by carrying a purse.)

Customer: *pointing to bag* “This isn’t mine, I promise!”

Me: “You stole someone’s purse?!”

Customer: “No, no! It’s my girlfriend’s.”

Me: “Yeah, I’m sure it is.”

(Just before closing time, I see the man leaving with some other people.)

Customer: *points to woman he’s with* “It was her bag, I swear!”

Me: “Right, of course.”

This Story Took A Turn

, , , , | Right | September 28, 2018

(I work as a cashier in Connecticut. Part of our job is to bag the purchase as we ring the items up. As usual, I bag up a middle-aged woman’s items and spin the turntable towards her so I can work on the next bag. Her eyes widen in awe.)

Customer: “Whoa… and you can take it off?”

Me: “Yes? You can take your bag whenever you’re ready.”

Customer: “And it spins?! That’s just so cool! I’m visiting from New Jersey and we don’t have these over there! It’s so handy; you can fill bags and spin them around and take them. That’s so cool! Everything is so different here; it’s like a whole different world.”

(She suddenly looks like she’s realized something.)

Customer: “I’m finally going to have to learn how to pump my own gas.”

(The rest of the transaction went normally, but I was in shock that this middle-aged woman had never seen a bagging turner before.)

Giving The Flat-Earthers Hope

, , , , | Learning | September 23, 2018

(At my university, the science building has classroom-style lectures where the rooms are long and have doors on both ends of the room, so you can hear a lot from the hall. I am walking past one class when I overhear one lecture.)

Teacher #1: “…remember that a hypothesis can never be proven true…”

(Next door…)

Teacher #2: “…there was a point in human history where people thought the Earth was flat…”

Page 1/1912345...Last