Don’t Discount The Customer’s Ability To Discount, Part 16

, , , , | Right | November 8, 2020

I work at a well-known discount store. Despite things being cheap, people still try to get things for even less. The latest “trend” is switching reduced labels from one product to another. This means, for example, that they try to buy stock worth £20 for £5.

Customer: “I’d like these, please.”

She hands me a bundle of curtains which are all reduced. This in itself is strange, because the packaging is immaculate and the curtains are new in. The only reduced curtains we have are ones which have shredded packaging or which are going off sale soon. Still, I scan the reduced label. The customer is standing there with a little smile on her face. I check what comes up on the till and realise what the woman is trying to do.

Me: “I’m sorry, but I think the reduced labels found their way onto the wrong products. These are still full price.”

Customer: “What? No, they’re reduced! It says so there! That one should be £5.99!”

Me: “Sorry, but it’s not.”

Customer: “How do you know?”

Me: “Because the till tells us what the reduced barcode is from; this barcode is for a dinosaur toy. The other is for a lampshade, and the other is for a canvas painting.”

The customer mumbled something about making a mistake and made a swift exit. This happened a few times before members of staff started writing the names of the products on the labels.

Related:
Don’t Discount The Customer’s Ability To Discount, Part 15
Don’t Discount The Customer’s Ability To Discount, Part 14
Don’t Discount The Customer’s Ability To Discount, Part 13
Don’t Discount The Customer’s Ability To Discount, Part 12
Don’t Discount The Customer’s Ability To Discount, Part 11

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