In A State Of Confusion, Part 6

, , , , | Working | May 10, 2018

(I am a district manager for a retail chain with locations all over North America and Europe. I am hiring a new store manager for a location in [State #1]. This location is close to the border with [State #2]. I get a call from a woman in personnel.)

Personnel: “Hi, in order to finish processing [Applicant]’s new-hire paperwork, we’re going to need a copy of his new driver’s license. He needs to have a local driver’s license.”

Me: “He already does. [Applicant] lives in [State #2]; he just will just be working in [State #1].”

Personnel: “No, that’s not legal. When you move to a new state, you have 30 days to get a new license, and we will need a copy of it.”

Me: “He is not moving to [State #1]. He’s going to continue to live in [State #2]. He will just be working in [State #1].”

Personnel: “I don’t understand. If he lives in [State #2], why doesn’t he apply at a location in [State #2]?”

Me: “Um, because the location he applied for is the closest one to his house? It’s a ten-minute drive.”

Personnel: “I don’t think that’s legal.”

Me: “I assure you that millions of Americans live in one state and work in another one. There’s nothing wrong with it.”

Personnel: “I think that violates our policies .”

Me: *losing patience* “Really? All of my stores are in [State #1], but I also happen to live in [State #2]!”

Personnel: “I’ll have to call you back.”

(Later, my boss called me. Apparently, someone in personnel reported me to him for not having a local driver’s license. My boss’s territory covers [State #1] and [State #2]. He lives just across the border… in [State #3].)

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