Misplaced Honesty

, , , | Legal | September 10, 2020

I work in a call centre for monthly-posted contact lenses.

Customer: “My daughter is [Daughter], and her account number is [number]. Can I have my daughter’s prescription info?” 

Me: *Looks it up* “No, I am sorry. I see here that she just turned eighteen and it’s considered medical information, which I cannot disclose to anyone but her now that she’s over eighteen. I need her to call us herself.”

She flips her writ, to the tune of:

Customer: “I pay for those lenses! She’s only a child! Why won’t you disclose the information?!”

And so on.

Me: *Over and over again* “This call is recorded. You’re asking me to break the law. I. Can. Not. Disclose. The. Information. You’re. Asking. For.”

Customer: “Okay, so I am [Daughter]. Now give me the information.”

Me: “You introduced yourself when you called. I know you are not.” 

Customer: “So, if I called back and told you I was her, how would you know?”

Me: “That is called fraud, and that’s illegal.”

Customer: “But how would you know?”

Me: “I strongly advise you against committing fraud, as that is illegal.”

Customer: “But how would you know?”

Me: “I strongly advise you against committing illegal acts.”

I was thinking: “You seriously expect me to tell you, on a recorded call, to go ahead and commit fraud? And you’re seriously telling me, on that RECORDED CALL, that you intend to?!”

I put a note on the file to ask the store to call the girl and ask her, and a note that I suspected fraud, to cover my own behind when no doubt the woman did just as she said she would. I know people commit fraud like that all the time, and nothing comes of it if the relative has approved the deception, but maybe don’t tell someone on a recorded call that you mean to break the law.

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