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You’re On A (Pay) Roll

, , , , , , | Working | CREDIT: boogiewoogie0909 | August 18, 2021

I began working payroll at sixteen years old. I am incredibly good with numbers, as well as dealing with clients. Suffice it to say, I am wonderful at what I do. Many years ago, I began working with a very small payroll company with only four workers. I really liked the owner and honestly still do. He is a decent dude. I also really liked the work and the clients.

However, I was not fond of [Direct Supervisor]. He was the worst supervisor I have ever had. He took smoke breaks every thirty minutes, he always thought he was right, he was very racist and sexist, and boy, he loved to talk. There were times where he was monologuing to a client who had hung up thirty minutes prior. However, he was the owner’s father-in-law whose prior business went bankrupt. Basically, he was never going to be fired.

In that work setting, I absolutely shone. I was the best employee by a huge margin.

One day, [Direct Supervisor] called me into his office and let me know that I was getting too much overtime. This was a small business and I needed to be careful. I never took much overtime. Overall, I usually had around two to five minutes by the end of the week, simply because I lived five minutes away and clocked in when I got in and settled, even if it was a minute early. I agreed to the new rule with a bit of glee.

From then on, if I got in early, I would get ready to clock in and then play on my phone or read for one minute before clocking in. This drove [Direct Supervisor] absolutely crazy. After I did this for a few days, he called me back into his office. He told me about the good old days when people would work even without pay in order to excel at life.

I politely reminded him that we were a payroll company, so he should be aware that it is illegal to not pay workers for time worked. From that point on, he would simply mutter under his breath and glare at me.

After three or four weeks, the owner called me into his office. Apparently, [Direct Supervisor] had been complaining about me, about how I wasn’t working hard and was being disrespectful. I explained the situation to him and pointed out that no clients had ever been unhappy with me, that I showed up to work every day on time, and that I had the most duties with the least problems.

[Owner] was a little shocked and annoyed that my tiny amount of overtime was the reason I was sitting in his office. He told me that if I needed it, I could have up to thirty minutes of overtime without needing it to be approved, and he also gave me a small raise for being such a hard worker. Finally, he told me that if [Direct Supervisor] ever gave me another rule that I disagreed with, I should go directly to him.

[Owner] then called [Direct Supervisor] into his office and I heard quite a bit of yelling. When [Direct Supervisor] came back out, he looked like he had just sucked a lemon.

It is my fondest memory of [Direct Supervisor].