You Can’t Insure Those Who Cannot Help Themselves

, , , , , | Right | March 26, 2020

(I am a licensed insurance agent. I have a client who was involved in a car accident in which he was not at fault. The other driver’s insurance company is responsible for repairing his vehicle. He calls me over a year after the accident and tells me that he is not having any luck with the other company. My agency prides itself on going above and beyond in order to provide excellent customer service. I spend over an hour tracking down a supervisor at the other company, who explains that their claim had been closed by mistake. She reopens her claim and promises that she will have someone call my client. I call him back and let him know to expect a call from the other company. Two days later, he calls me and tells me that no one has called him. I get the other company’s supervisor back on the line. She tells me that her employee called my client the previous day at a particular time and left a voicemail, and also sent him an email. I call him again.)

Me: “The other company called you yesterday at [time] and left you a voicemail. Did you receive it?”

Customer: “I have voicemail set up, but I don’t know how to check it. Can you tell them to call me again?”

Me: “Did you get a call yesterday at [time]?”

Customer: “Yes, I did, but I don’t answer the phone if I don’t recognize the number. Too many telemarketers.”

Me: “They also sent you an email. Check that, and it will give you the number to call them back.”

Customer: “I have email set up, but I know how to check it. Just tell them to call me again.”

(This scenario repeats again two days later, with him unable to check voicemail or email, and not answering a phone number he doesn’t recognize.)

Me: “[Customer], you are going to have to answer the phone in order to talk to them and get your vehicle repaired.”

Customer: “I’ll try, but I really hate telemarketers, so I don’t like to answer numbers I don’t recognize.”

Me: *facepalm*

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