Will Try Logan And Again And Again

, , , , | Right | June 13, 2017

(I work at a very popular cinema as a supervisor. A very popular superhero movie has just been released; unlike its predecessors, it has received a high rated label, R16. Law in this country states that parents CANNOT give consent for under-aged kids to attend. If a person looks under a certain age, we are legally required to ask for suitable ID, or we must deny entry. A customer has picked up from me his online booking for four adult tickets from our counter. As we are trained to do, I enquire if everyone attending is the age of 16 or older, with correct ID if under 25, which is more a precautionary ask. This just means we have some stance behind us if someone tries to pull a fast one and say “no-one told me about the rating.” Usually this is not a problem. This man assures me everyone is an adult of correct age. Minutes later, I am called upstairs to the entrance of the cinemas. I find the customer with whom I assume are his wife, and two children, clearly under the age of 13. He looks furious, and as soon as I approach, he starts ripping into me verbally regarding his right as a parent to allow his children to watch what he allows.)

Customer: “This is just unbelievably stupid. I am their father; I say they are old enough to watch this film! What right do you have to check their age, and to tell them no?”

Me: “Unfortunately, sir, it is NZ law that they have to be the age of 16 and older. Parents cannot overrule this. And as a cinema, we have a policy that we need to check anyone who looks under a certain age, and deny them if they cannot provide the proof they are of age.”

(Note the years of practice in this sentence, because this is not the first time I have had to use this.)

Customer: “Where does it say this? I didn’t see any information anywhere that they weren’t allowed? No-one told me anything when I bought my tickets!”

Me: “You were asked, at the counter when you picked them up, if everyone was of age with suitable ID.”

Customer: “I was not! Your staff did not ask me!”

Me: “I picked your tickets up, sir, and I distinctly remember asking you this. You told me all four tickets were for ADULTs, as you booked it.”

Customer: *recognises me* “Well, that doesn’t give you any right to deny my kids. I am their father, and I say their dates of birth are [two different, clearly older than actual date of births] and [repeats date of his and wife’s birth in spiteful manner] just in case you decide you want mine and my wife’s!”

Me: “Well, you and you wife are clearly over the age of 16… but your kids look under-aged and we need better proof than just parental information.”

Customer: “Where is your information around the building stating this, then?”

(I point to plaques on the wall with information four feet away, providing visual proof of law and cinema policy that we keep on hand on the floor for these circumstances.)

Me: “Also, when you book tickets, you must tick you have read these terms and conditions before being allowed to complete transaction. It is not the responsibility of the cinema if you fail to read them.”

Customer: *starts to get real nasty in his language*

(We go back and forth for a few minutes, and he asks to speak to my manager. I walkie-talkie downstairs, but the managers are dealing with another difficult customer at this point, so I inform the gentleman he must wait. This sets him off more, and he states he will just walk into the theatre with his kids. I inform him I will not stop him, but I will be asking security to remove him and his family, as is our protocol. He starts saying to me he will call a local newspaper to tell them how shameful we are, etc.)

Customer #2: *who has been waiting patiently in the background for another theatre to finish being cleaned* “Mate, just give it up! Stop being a f****** d*** about this! She told you why your kids can’t go in. Go be a f****** s***ty parent at home! Everyone knows this movie ain’t for kids!”

(The man swore at the other gentleman, at which point I asked him to leave. He and his family ended up going downstairs to demand a refund of money. They were offered to be placed into another non-R-rated film, even an upgrade in theatre to 3D, or to receive complimentary passes to come back on another day. They kept demanding money back, but were refused this, as they had purchased online and it was their responsibility to be aware that choosing a film marked R16, did not mean they could take in their kids, who turned out to be 8 and 12 year sold. I gave the other customer a free large popcorn. It’s rare someone sticks up for us like that! It was appreciated that he understood. Thank you kind customer.)

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  • Sorority Taylor

    Deadpool?
    Edit: Post canceled. Nothing to see here.

    • Read the title of the post.

    • Tor Iver Wilhelmsen

      Probably Logan, as per the title. Even though they persist in “de-trademarking” names in the story, as if e.g. “he ordered a grande latte at [coffe chain]” is just silly for anyone who has been to a Starbucks, which it would be.

    • Deadpool

      What? It wasn’t my fault!

      • Vira Vandom

        Glorious.

      • Katherine Alice Thompson

        To be fair, Wade, you at least warn people before stuff gets ugly in your movie.

        • Deadpool

          Well, the “R” rating (or R16 in “NEW ZEALAND” [like that’s a real place]) is meant to be a clue. But clueless people like this guy, just aren’t able to see those clues.

  • Alison Steiner

    They probably thought it was like the other Xmen movies which while a bit violent were nothing compared to Logan. I wonder what the man would say if they got to all see the movie and the kids were traumatized and got nightmares

    • Cassia212

      Yeah that’s the thing about “s***ty” parents like this guy, they’ll do whatever they can to get around the protocols in place to prevent their children from being exposed to things that aren’t age-appropriate just because they want to see the movie or their kids want to and they’re incapable of saying “no,” then when their kid is upset as a result suddenly it’s everyone else’s fault.

      • Susan McInnis

        And of course when their kids have nightmares and keep them up all night they’ll be screaming about it not being a movie to take kids to! You just can’t win with some people!

        • NessaTameamea

          “why didn’t you tell us that the movie is so violent??? This is really bad customer service!!!”

      • Illogically

        I saw that happen once with the movie “Watchmen”. In the US it is legal for a parent to take their child to an R-rated movie, although the theater workers generally try to explain why they shouldn’t. This one woman got irritated by the ticket seller’s explanation and insisted on buying tickets anyway and took her two kids (who both looked around 10-ish) into the theater. A few minutes after the violence began, she stormed out ranting about how it was a comic book movie and that meant it should be for kids and how dare they let her precious children see that kind of gore.

        • Siirenias

          They should really keep an issue of Deadpool and The Mask under the desk for just such misconceptions.

          • Vulpis

            ‘But they’re comic books!’ (Then again not that many people remember Tales from the Crypt comics, either…)

          • Vulpis

            ‘But they’re comic books!’ (Then again not that many people remember Tales from the Crypt comics, either…)

        • Jill Lybarger

          There was a woman at the showing of “Watchmen” I saw with four small children (the oldest might have been 10)
          Numerous people in line, including my husband, warned her that the movie was not for kids. The ticket seller warned her that it was not for kids. She kept saying “It’s a superhero movie!”.
          The first time Dr. Manhattan’s penis appeared on screen, in it’s full glowing blue glory, she stormed out of the theater, dragging the kids with her. She was still in the lobby trying, unsuccessfully, to get a refund when we left.
          I want to stress the moment in the movie that offended her – those kids had already seen numerous violent deaths and a rape – it was a PENIS that made her leave!

        • Kathy Plester

          Had something similar when I was in HMV many years ago. I was in there just browsing and some woman comes storming in with a DVD she bought – I noticed it was an anime which I knew was very violent and gory. She slams it down and demands a refund. Even though it had was rated an 18, she is just ripping into the clerk about how they could sell this filth to kids. The guy points out the 18 sticker and she just yells ‘It’s a f*cking cartoon. It’s animated SEE! How was I supposed to know it wasn’t for kids? All cartoons are for kids!!!’ She wanted a full refund and then some because now she had to buy more stuff because her kids were so traumatised by watching it. They offered to refund her for the DVD, but they wouldn’t give her more because there was the rating on there and she should know that means it’s not suitable for kids. Then as the clerk goes to open the case to check everything, the DVD wasn’t in there and the woman just goes ‘I snapped it in two and threw it away, it was pure filth’. When she was told she’d get nothing back unless she could bring the DVD back in, undamaged, she went ballistic and they had to get security to escort her out. Hilarious since, yeah maybe she’s completely unaware of anime and how mature it can be, but it’s not like the west doesn’t have cartoons clearly for adults.

          • Vulpis

            ….If you were saying that rather than typying it, I’d be saying ‘Breathe! Breathe!’ 🙂
            But yeah…in Japan, animation is a medium rather than a genre like it mostly is in the US (which is why people freaked out at things like Heavy Metal and Rock N’ Rule)…and you get freaky at both ends of the spectrum, from the heavy-gore-fetish stuff on one end, to the ultra-ultra-ultra-saccarine on the other..

          • Kathy Plester

            As I said, we have mature cartoons and even comics in the west. Granted, perhaps not as many since as you say anime is more an alternative medium choice and it varies massively from cutesy fluffy kid stuff to stuff with really mature themes and language, nudity, s*x and violence. My point was it’s not like adult only animated stuff is not just a thing in Japan we have it in the west too – such as Archer (which I think has an 18 rating and has animated s*x scenes and lots of swearing).

          • Kathy Plester

            As I said, we have mature cartoons and even comics in the west. Granted, perhaps not as many since as you say anime is more an alternative medium choice and it varies massively from cutesy fluffy kid stuff to stuff with really mature themes and language, nudity, s*x and violence. My point was it’s not like adult only animated stuff is not just a thing in Japan we have it in the west too – such as Archer (which I think has an 18 rating and has animated s*x scenes and lots of swearing).

          • Vulpis

            ….If you were saying that rather than typying it, I’d be saying ‘Breathe! Breathe!’ 🙂
            But yeah…in Japan, animation is a medium rather than a genre like it mostly is in the US (which is why people freaked out at things like Heavy Metal and Rock N’ Rule)…and you get freaky at both ends of the spectrum, from the heavy-gore-fetish stuff on one end, to the ultra-ultra-ultra-saccarine on the other..

          • technomage1

            They do the same with video games. The classification system exists to make it easy for them, but they ignore it. The amount of parents buying their kids, young kids, the latest GTA or horror game rated M astonds and depresses me. And clerks do tell them about the rating but they buy it anyway.

          • Kathy Plester

            I’ve seen plenty of those. A woman at work once was complaining to me she bought her eight year old a Silent Hill game and now he was freaking out and she couldn’t believe they made a game like that that little kids could play and I said ‘Well it *is* rated 18 and is a horror game. It’s not really for young kids at all. Why did yo even buy it for him when he is 10 years too young?’ She replied ‘Well I didn’t think video game ratings meant anything like they were just recommend ages or something because the game was hard’.

          • jokergirl129

            Doesn’t really surprise me. I’ve also read stories with parents complaining about how violent or scary a video game was. Even though the game was clearly rated M and if you read the back it would tell you why it has an M rating.

            The parents didn’t bother to read the ratings or do any research on the game at all and yet come back angry that the game scared their kids or had content they didn’t want their kids to see. Even worse when they have the mentality that video games are just for kids hence don’t realize there are games meant for older teens and adults.

            Equally annoying when it comes to cartoons and comic books too. They’re not all meant for kids and are rated accordingly.

          • EricKei

            Used to do time as a retail clerk at a game store — I recall when the “Hot Coffee” GTA game came out, we had a number of adults buying the game for their little kids by proxy. When they had the kids in tow, or they mentioned that it was by request, we told them in no uncertain terms why NOT to get it for their children.

            Many of those parents decided against it, said that they would have a little chat with the kids for deceiving them, and most even thanked us for the heads-up. On the other hand, some said it was fine, which meant that we had to sell them the game. My favorite rationale for getting the game anyway was from the parental unit of a ten-year-old: “It’s OK. I just turn the volume off so he doesn’t hear any naughty words.” Apparently, she was just fine with the violence…and the fact that most games have subtitles available, and did even back then.

          • technomage1

            They do the same with video games. The classification system exists to make it easy for them, but they ignore it. The amount of parents buying their kids, young kids, the latest GTA or horror game rated M astonds and depresses me. And clerks do tell them about the rating but they buy it anyway.

          • Illogically

            Wow… Some people just don’t realize the ratings system exists for a reason. Being one media or another reeeeally doesn’t automatically make it for kids. Video games, comic books, anime… Don’t rely on the rest of the world to supervise your kids!

          • Ophelia

            Well, to some people, a ratings system is someone else telling them what to do, which is unacceptable.

          • beacon80

            I remember, back in the days of VHS tapes, noting that most anime at Blockbusters had large “Not for chlidren!” stickers in the corner. I doubt it actually helped much.

          • Ophelia

            That would’ve been hilarious if it was something like One Piece, which was inspired by Tom & Jerry and Tex Avery (and actually IS aimed at kids in Japan); or Panty & Stocking with Garterbelt, which was made to look like The Powerpuff Girls (though the title should tip anyone off that this one is not for kids).

            I heard a lot of stories about parents taking their kids to theaters to watch South Park: Bigger, Longer, Uncut and storming out in rage, apparently unfamiliar with South Park. I mean, to be fair, if all you know about South Park is its name, its art style, and that its four central characters are small children, you might think it’s a kids show, but its R-rating should be a warning. (I went to Thailand some time back and saw a lot of bootleg South Park merchandise apparently made and sold by people thinking it IS a kids show.)

            (You also seem to run into a lot of, well, interesting people, to put it one way.)

        • Kathy Plester

          Had something similar when I was in HMV many years ago. I was in there just browsing and some woman comes storming in with a DVD she bought – I noticed it was an anime which I knew was very violent and gory. She slams it down and demands a refund. Even though it had was rated an 18, she is just ripping into the clerk about how they could sell this filth to kids. The guy points out the 18 sticker and she just yells ‘It’s a f*cking cartoon. It’s animated SEE! How was I supposed to know it wasn’t for kids? All cartoons are for kids!!!’ She wanted a full refund and then some because now she had to buy more stuff because her kids were so traumatised by watching it. They offered to refund her for the DVD, but they wouldn’t give her more because there was the rating on there and she should know that means it’s not suitable for kids. Then as the clerk goes to open the case to check everything, the DVD wasn’t in there and the woman just goes ‘I snapped it in two and threw it away, it was pure filth’. When she was told she’d get nothing back unless she could bring the DVD back in, undamaged, she went ballistic and they had to get security to escort her out. Hilarious since, yeah maybe she’s completely unaware of anime and how mature it can be, but it’s not like the west doesn’t have cartoons clearly for adults.

        • Nightshade1972

          I’m in the US. R is “under 17 not admitted *without parent*”. In 1986, when I was 14, Oliver Stone’s “Platoon” came out. My father’s a ‘Nam vet, and I wanted to see it, too. They looked a little sideways at me at the ticket counter, but once my father vouched for me, they let him buy two tickets.

          I didn’t think Platoon was that big a deal. However, when Hannibal came out, in my mid20s (well over the age of admittance for R rated films), my father and I saw that, too. I spent a good portion of the movie with my hands in front of my face, not wanting to see the onscreen gore.

          • Illogically

            Yep, parents can take their kids. Most (I hope) people have common sense and can judge what will or won’t bother their children. I got to see several R-rated movies when I was younger because my parents knew I understood that it was fictional, but they’d go watch the movies without me first to make sure it wasn’t something that would really scare me. It’s parents like the woman in the story that are the problem.

        • Rob Tonka

          “although the theater workers generally try to explain why they shouldn’t. ”

          They do? I’ve never seen that happen, nor did that ever happen when I was a kid going to an R movie with my mom. The only time I’ve ever had any pushback from theater workers is when I and my friends, who were all clearly under 17, tried to go to an R-Rated movie and they would not sell us the tix without id.

          Never seen a theater worker say jack to an adult.

          • Illogically

            I see it fairly often, because of this exact scenario. They’ve warned the parents, the parents insist it’s fine and buy the tickets anyway, the theater doesn’t have to give a refund when the parent storms out complaining. They were informed. Maybe it’s not as big of an issue in your area.

    • Kitty

      I only saw trailers and heard about Logan’s relationship toward Laura and said, “…is this The Last Of Us?”

      • Dawn

        Wait till you see the Dad of War trailer…

      • Dawn

        Wait till you see the Dad of War trailer…

        • Vulpis

          ….I’m imagining Kratos with a group of little Kratos-lings here… 🙂

        • Vulpis

          ….I’m imagining Kratos with a group of little Kratos-lings here… 🙂

    • JDP

      Eh, they probably would have just thought the movie was cool af. I understand the laws are there for a reason, but it’s definitely the type of thing I’d have seen when I was a kid and it certainly wouldn’t have given me nightmares. While really violent, it’s not a *scary* movie, and the majority of the violence inflicted is by the mutants on humans in defense, which is pretty much most of the reason anyone is going to see it in the first place. Then again, my mom/dad also taught me how to separate reality from fantasy, so stuff like that never really afflicted me in any sort of way.

      Also please don’t mistake this as me defending the parents. They were 100% in the wrong; I just don’t think they’re bad people on the basis of taking their kids to see ‘Logan’. I think they — at least the father — suck for how they treat the staff for simply doing their jobs.

      • Ty

        Trying to break the law for his precious angels does make him a bit of a douchebag though. He’s teaching his kids that laws and rules shouldn’t apply to them because they’re special. Down the line that’s going to cause some problems

        • datawog

          Yeah, which is why he’s a dick for his attitude with the workers, but not necessarily for letting his kids watch a violent movie. Your kids are allowed to watch that kind of stuff? Fine. Wait till it comes out on DVD and let them see it at home.

          I watched plenty of R-rated stuff when I was the same age as those kids. My parents would let me watch pretty much ANYTHING. It never freaked me out or gave me nightmares (ironically, the only movie to do so was PG-13), so if they know their kids are like me and can handle that sort of thing, go crazy. But don’t try to make a business subject to fines because of choices you make for your family.

    • Carl Collier

      Yes because the other X-Men movies were at most PG-13 and this one was R, you’d have to be a dumbass to not kn…

      I rest my case…

    • Carl Collier

      Yes because the other X-Men movies were at most PG-13 and this one was R, you’d have to be a dumbass to not kn…

      I rest my case…

    • Vulpis

      Worse, what if the kids started laughing at it like it was a comedy?

      • Antonia Siemaszko

        I laughed my head off in a theatre when I was younger and was taken to see the original Exorcist with Linda Blair I thought the effects were a total riot and SO not realistic that it was funny.

        The Omen, that scared me a little, but I still got to see it.

        The difference however is this is the US where ratings are guidelines and not overseas where ratings have the force of LAW. People who live overseas should know this by now and just wait for the DVD or the OnDemand showing from their cable/dish

    • Vulpis

      Worse, what if the kids started laughing at it like it was a comedy?

    • Applestache

      Simple. They’d blame the cinema

  • technomage1

    I assume if the theater lets them in they get a fine. It seems to me only fair that if this happens, then parents such as this who attempt this should get a bigger penalty, as theyre doing this with full knowledge of age of their children.

    • David McCooey

      In the UK, the cinema can be hit with an unlimited fine, as can the member of staff. The cinema could also lose its license to present age restricted movies.

  • cypher20

    Eh, that’s total garbage but it’s the law’s fault not the theater. Elect nanny state politicians, get nanny state laws.

    • Deadpool

      Deadpool for president! (Or whatever the heck New Zealand has for leaders – I’m not going to do the work to find out what their leaders are called.) I’m also peeved that NAW won’t even let you say H E Double hockey sticks.

      • Christopher Kennard

        We have a Prime Minister and a Governor General who acts as the Queen’s representative.

      • Vulpis

        I wouldn’t vote Deadpool for leader. The little text boxes on the other hand, have a chance.

      • Vulpis

        I wouldn’t vote Deadpool for leader. The little text boxes on the other hand, have a chance.

    • I_browse_with_Lynx

      It’s not the government’s fault either: the dad is just a god-awful parent and pathetic excuse for a human being. If more laws restricting bad parenting were in place, this story wouldn’t have happened.

      • Deadpool

        Exactly. Just put up these handy No Crime Allowed signs everywhere, and crime will come to a screeching halt!

        https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/e9f0ea2e65de6055c5a939bcbcebda3ff246579f4dd86be7ed5f8dbb1e1541d6.jpg

        • I_browse_with_Lynx

          I can see you could have benefitted from better parenting, too.

          • Deadpool

            Or laws outlawing my life of crime. If only crime was outlawed, then we could stop all the criminals, like me.

          • I_browse_with_Lynx

            You must be really lonely dedicating yourself to mimicking a relatively obscure comic book character for a commenting platform.

          • Deadpool

            Obscure? Excuse me? Lady, I am currently ranked #10 all time for Comic Book Movie Grosses. And #1 all time for R-rated comic movies. I’m trying to think what else Deadpool might say, but yeah, I got nothin. Which is probably exactly what Deadpool would say. I’m so Meta that way.

            Have a nice day.

            https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3f460bbe02144ae1404c2ae6a91d8f1cb7ae87c897383715cd88813dea6e88fa.gif

          • Asiyd

            LOL DEADPOOL is an obscure comic book character?! xD

          • Cally

            Stop, please, while you’re able.

        • Stacy

          This argument will always be one of the dumbest things to use as a logical reason in a debate about a law you think shouldn’t exist.

          The only way to get rid of all criminals is to get rid of all laws. Societies can’t exist without laws. Good luck with that.

          PS – Deadpool is smart enough to know that 😉

          • Vulpis

            Well, if you get rid of the laws, there would be no way to break them, and thus no criminals. This is called an ‘anarchy’. In practice, outside of a small group it’s pretty much a nightmare existance.

          • Vulpis

            Well, if you get rid of the laws, there would be no way to break them, and thus no criminals. This is called an ‘anarchy’. In practice, outside of a small group it’s pretty much a nightmare existance.

          • Stacy

            Thanks for explaining to me what I just explained. Good looking out!

        • cypher20

          Everyone ALWAYS read the signs and follow them. People in retail and customer service know this for a fact!

          • Deadpool

            Especially criminals. They’re even more likely to read and follow the signs, which is why there are never any shootings in places where guns are banned.

    • Grabate

      Your absolutely right. How dare our great great Grandfathers vote for the Reform Party who then wrote the Cinematograph-film Censorship Act in 1916.

  • Kirishima Touka

    This made me think of when the third LOTR movie was released. Unlike its predecessors, it was rated 12 in the UK and – at the time – I was 11 and ten months old. My parents were very strongly against lying and, had my mother been questioned as to my age, would have admitted I wasn’t 12. I was terrified that I wouldn’t be able to see it.

    Fortunately it was around the time that the 12A cinema rating was introduced, so I was allowed in with an adult. Also the staff didn’t give a cr*p.

    • Kitty

      I was about 3 months away from being 12 when Princess Mononoke came out. I went with my dad and older brother, the guy checking the tickets asked, “Is she at least 12?” My father, busy looking for the tickets, says “Two months…” And my brother says, “She’s been 12 for 2 months, he means.” Yeah, I was allowed in. No, nothing in the movie terrified me – mostly cause nothing in it is that terrifying, actually.

      • Kirishima Touka

        I keep hearing Princess Mononoke being mentioned. I must watch it.

        For the record, I loved LOTR when it came out. Mum and my sister were bored during the action scenes because they’re weird and those are the best parts.

        • Kitty

          Princess Mononoke is good; majority of Hayao Miyazaki movies are good to watch. Some add unnecessary, big world problems into it (like Ponyo) when it doesn’t need them, but they are fun to watch. I have a movie done by his son, but have yet to watch it.

          Personally, I find LotR to be very boring. Mostly, I dunno, it’s just not my type of fantasy. I liked Harry Potter, which might have to do with the fact that part of it is grounded in reality…

          • Vulpis

            I object to what he did to the story in the book, myself. Then again, where I live the opinion is generally ‘That hack Tolkein did a horribly bad novelization of Jackson’s films! I hope he never writes one again!’

          • Vulpis

            I object to what he did to the story in the book, myself. Then again, where I live the opinion is generally ‘That hack Tolkein did a horribly bad novelization of Jackson’s films! I hope he never writes one again!’

      • Kathy Plester

        Yeah there are some violent scenes in Princess Mononoke but not many and they’re all appropriate and I don’t think they’re ‘shocking’ or ‘scary’ in anyway. I love that film – one of my faves ever.

        My dad would always tease me about liking ‘cartoons’ when I was a teen but he absolutely loves Spirited Away – he thinks it’s such a gorgeous film.

        • Kitty

          Chihiro is a great movie. Okay, yes, it’s basically ‘Japanese Alice In Wonderland’, but contrary to Alice, Chihiro actually had personality. (Yeah, I don’t like the two Alice books…) The music is good; the River God part was pretty cool; the artstyle is amazing (just LOOK at the food on the screen; you want to eat it!) and the scene of Chihiro crying with Haku comforting her always makes me tear up.

          Also, in the German version, one of my former classmates voices Chihiro. Well, not a classmate I was friends with, though.

        • Rachel

          I literally had a TON of nightmares over both the demon-curse-thing that made the pig into that death-wormy thing and all of the people wearing the pigs skins and going through the woods.

          So yeah, depends on the person on what they find ‘scary.’

          • Kathy Plester

            Yeah it’s different for different people. Growing up my mother let me watch all kinds of movies. If it was too gory or scary or there were s*x scenes she’d just ask em to cover my eyes, and if there was a lot of swear words she’d not let me watch it but a few here and there were okay. This might be why I don’t mind it. I still remember being about 5 or 6 and watching Hitchcock’s ‘The Birds’ and not covering my eyes in time to see a bird pull out somebody’s eyeball – the freaked me out for a while.

          • Ronald M Bisnett

            Yeah, that pig was freaky to me and I was in my 30s when I saw it at home. Waaaay too well-done. I usually have a high threshold, but maggot-y things… no, just no. Same with scenes in ‘Supernatural’ where someone’s food is suddenly filled with maggots.

            I do know that a lot of folks, when encouraging newbies w/ small children to start watching Miyazaki movies, to maaaybe build up to Mononoke. Or at least give them a heads-up and suggest they watch it themselves first to see if they feel their children will be okay with it.

    • NessaTameamea

      I was also 11 when we went to see it 😀
      Mum and me were waiting not in line but still in clear sight of the ticket booths so the cashier could see us, and dad was buying the tickets. Luckily when he was asked about my age he immediately said twelve without thinking. I think the staff also didn’t care that much because I looked the right age.

      • Kirishima Touka

        What’s a month or twelve going to matter?

    • datawog

      I’m still a bit bitter that I wasn’t allowed to see LOTR a third time because I had to have my mom with me… I think age restrictions are pretty stupid, honestly. Everyone’s different and can handle/not handle different things. I happened to be a kid that could watch R-rated movies at 8 without getting freaked out, and 3 years later thought Fellowship was the most awesome movie ever.

      • Vulpis

        Enh…age thresholds are a legal construct anyway. I mean, anyone who thinks that turning 18 suddenly makes you an adult has never seen the local college students…

      • Vulpis

        Enh…age thresholds are a legal construct anyway. I mean, anyone who thinks that turning 18 suddenly makes you an adult has never seen the local college students…

    • datawog

      I’m still a bit bitter that I wasn’t allowed to see LOTR a third time because I had to have my mom with me… I think age restrictions are pretty stupid, honestly. Everyone’s different and can handle/not handle different things. I happened to be a kid that could watch R-rated movies at 8 without getting freaked out, and 3 years later thought Fellowship was the most awesome movie ever.

    • David McCooey

      The 12A rating came in shortly after a Spiderman film released as a 12 and lots of parents went crazy because they couldn’t take their kids to it. The 12A became a rating in August 2002, Return of The King released in December of 2003.

      I was working in a cinema at the time.

      • Kirishima Touka

        …so there was a year’s difference, meaning it was “around the time of”

  • Grabate

    Alternate Reality News: Children left traumatized after negligent cinema lets underage kids into R rated film. Father taking legal action.

    • Kitty

      Subtitle: Father laughed out of court for attempt of taking legal action.

      • Dsru Bin

        Father: “I didn’t know the law! It’s the cimena’s responsibility to ensure that everyone is of an acceptable age and they fell short!”

  • Serabeth

    I agree it’s stupid that the parent isn’t allowed to consent to what his kids can watch. But if it’s the law, it’s the law. There’s nothing the theater can do about it. And he doesn’t deserve any compensation if he checked the box that everyone was over 16 and answered yes when the employee asked their ages.

    • Marianne

      He strikes me as the kind of parent though who would then b**** and moan to staff that no one warned him how violent/inappropriate it was for his kids.

    • cylon_toast

      Yeah, but some parents say it’s okay and then come storming out of the theater saying “HOW COULD YOU LET ME SHOW THAT TO MY KID?!”

      • Ophelia

        “WHY DID YOU LET ME DO THIS ILLEGAL THING!? IT’S ALL YOUR FAULT!”

        • cylon_toast

          Pretty much.

  • Kitty

    Law > Parents. Period. Being a parent does not make you god almighty.

    • Deadpool

      “The law is made for man, not man for the law.” – Some guy we killed.

    • Vulpis

      Even the ones that think they have ‘little angels’? 😉

    • Vulpis

      Even the ones that think they have ‘little angels’? 😉

  • Adrian Mckeehan

    I would guarantee that if they watched Logan with their kids. They would complain more about the brief nudity than the extreme violence

    • Vulpis

      And here I thought that was a US thing…

      • Adrian Mckeehan

        Stupidity isn’t exclusively an American trait, But we do it better than anyone else

        • Cassia212

          Freaking out over nudity and/or “strong language” does seem to be unique to the US from what I understand. Seeing someone get disemboweled? Eh, whatever. Seeing bare breasts, even in a non-sexual context, or hearing an F bomb? HOW DARE YOU EXPOSE MY PRECIOUS ANGEL TO SUCH FILTH?

      • Adrian Mckeehan

        Stupidity isn’t exclusively an American trait, But we do it better than anyone else

    • Vulpis

      And here I thought that was a US thing…

  • LadyBelle

    I remember seeing one of the Scream movies in the theater. There was a woman there with her 4 kids, at least 3 of them being under the age of 7. “Mommy, is that person really dead, why does he have blood?” Of course being that young, they also weren’t interested in sitting down and being quite for that length of time. Yeah, so traumatize the kids and ruin the movie for every other ticket purchasing adult.

    • NessaTameamea

      Wow, that’s really stupid and also messed up.

    • StirlingG

      Years ago I was watching the original Jurassic Park movie in the theater. There was a woman sitting a couple rows ahead of me with a boy who looked to be about 4. During one of the scenes, the boy got scared and started crying. His mother told him to shut up and went back to watching the movie while her son whimpered and sobbed. At no point did she remove her terrified son from the theater.

      • Nic

        …Wow. Now that’s bad parenting.

    • Blake Barrett

      I remember going to I Know What You Did Last Summer with my brothers. I was old enough to see the movie, and so was one of my brothers. But the other was about 12 at the time. All 3 of us were given tickets. But it didn’t traumatize my younger brother. He knew what he was getting into. And he was also a fan of Scream.

    • Ronald M Bisnett

      There was a father there with a girl who was 9 at the oldest when I saw Scream 3. I don’t remember her being a problem during the show, but I thought it was an odd choice of movies for her age. Of course, my older brothers had me watching the Nightmare on Elm Street movies at a younger age than her.

      I was 13 and standing between my oldest brother and my cousin at the window when I got in to see Timecop. The next day at school I found out one of my classmates tried to get in to the showing, but was turned away for not having anyone old enough with her. I love theaters that accepted older brother as “parent or adult guardian” for R-rated films.

    • Ophelia

      My father was a big fan of horror movies. He liked them all, from the no-budget stuff direct-to-video to the big budget Hollywood blockbusters. He liked them so much, he had me sit down and watch them with him when they were on TV when I was in the single-digit ages. I was scared, shocked, crying, I begged for him to let me go elsewhere, but he insisted with every fiber of his being on making me watch them to their ends. I don’t know if he genuinely didn’t understand I didn’t like them as much as he did (I still do not watch horror films, but as an adult, it’s because they don’t appeal to me) or he was trying to desensitize me to them, but it didn’t work as planned. Eventually, I grew to become apprehensive any time he’d bring me down to watch a movie, as I couldn’t tell if it was going to be Candyman or Care Bears. He’d bring me over to watch a movie on TV and not tell me what it was until it began, and he’d get angry if I refused or I wanted to walk out midway through one of HIS movies.

      I don’t know if him doing this to me made me even MORE sensitive to violence though, but I was one of the most sensitive to it when I was little compared to my classmates. I couldn’t even watch action movies or action TV shows without getting terrified. During my elementary school years, I consumed comedy and comedy only. (Well, cartoon violence like in Looney Tunes was okay with me–it was the more realistic violence I couldn’t stand.)

      • jokergirl129

        I’m sorry he put you through that. That sounds awful and I wouldn’t be surprise if you being forced to watch blood, gore and violence before you were ready did make you more sensitive to it. No parent should make their kids watch something when it clearly makes them uncomfortable to watch it.

  • Panther Shark

    If you want to see the movie so bad with your kids, follow the damn laws and wait to watch them at home. If you don’t like them, petition to change them. It is a bit ridiculous. But little kids can be unruly around movies that are not within their age group (and even then). The first rated R movie I saw in theaters was James Bond, back in ’97 I think. I was 6. But that wasn’t until I watched Alien 3 at home. I handled that pretty well, I think.

    • Novelista

      I was about to say the same thing–do it like an American and watch it at home. 😛

  • minipopcorn

    It is interesting that so many other countries have laws about movie ratings. I feel a parent should be allowed to decide what they feel their kid can handle, but at the same time, so many parents don’t consider the child. They want to see the movie, but they don’t want to pay for a babysitter. There are also the parents who don’t bother to research why a movie is rated the way it was. I told my coworker not to bring her kids to Deadpool because it wasn’t appropriate, she knew nothing about the movie and listened to my advice. She likely would have researched it though​, because of the R rating.

    • datawog

      With the prices of tickets and concessions these days, you’d think it would actually be cheaper to just hire a babysitter.

    • datawog

      With the prices of tickets and concessions these days, you’d think it would actually be cheaper to just hire a babysitter.

    • Deadpool

      Why would you do such a thing? You prevented me from corrupting her little angels for at least 6 months… or however long it takes to come out on DVD now.

    • Deadpool

      Why would you do such a thing? You prevented me from corrupting her little angels for at least 6 months… or however long it takes to come out on DVD now.

    • Vulpis

      To be honest, the laws are there less to protect kids from trauma, than to protect the theaters from parents wanting to inflict trauma.
      As has been pointed out, they could just wait for the home release and make their own decision there. But the theater gets to decide who gets to see the movie in *their* venue, not the parent.

    • Vulpis

      To be honest, the laws are there less to protect kids from trauma, than to protect the theaters from parents wanting to inflict trauma.
      As has been pointed out, they could just wait for the home release and make their own decision there. But the theater gets to decide who gets to see the movie in *their* venue, not the parent.

  • AspieFluttershy

    Why do so many people think the law doesn’t apply to them?

    • Ophelia

      One word: Pride.

  • Pogla

    Paging Deadpool

    • Deadpool

      What? I’m a busy guy. I’ve got people to go and places to kill.

      • Pogla

        I’ve got a message from Death. She said “later snookums”

        Also, she gave me a hairbrush.

        • Deadpool

          Oh yeah? Well, I’ve got a message back. Tell her, “I bet you can’t kill this messenger.”

          Let me know how that goes.

    • Deadpool

      What? I’m a busy guy. I’ve got people to go and places to kill.

  • Pogla

    Paging Deadpool

  • Sadies Ariel

    TThat’s the f***ing stupidest thing I’ve ever heard of. My nieces and nephews were raised to be extremely independent, free thinking, and were allowed to make their own choices and learn by doing and seeing. They’re taught to not blindly accept anything, question, research and form their own opinions, and live their lives the way they see fit, because they are individuals and no one has control over another individual. My sisters and brothers only intervened in the most extreme circumstances, which were rare as the kids could either solve their own problems, ask the older ones for help, or ask for HELP figuring out the problem (never just expect one of us to do it for them). They’ve travelled around the world, experienced things in their childhood most people won’t in their entire lives, and are all at minimum, 5 years / levels above where traditional kids are. As a result, all 10 of them, aged infant to 12 years old, handle life better than most adults in their 30s and 40s.
    If ANYONE especially a “law” had tried to tell my siblings how to raise their kids and what they were and weren’t allowed to do, there wouldn’t have been a country to make “laws” anymore.

    • Kels SuperNinjaBat

      If you don’t like the law, petition to change it. Don’t punish some minimum wage movie clerk who has nothing to do with it but just has to enforce it.

      • Sadies Ariel

        That’s exactly what they teach their kids. If you don’t like something, change it.
        Had it been my sister, I know for a fact that clerk wouldn’t have had to worry about her minimum wage anymore cuz she wouldn’t have been able to function in life after my sis got done with her. You don’t tell people how to raise their kids. Period.

        • Dsru Bin

          OP didn’t tell the couple how to raise their kids. She followed the law. And even your sis must follow the law. Period.

          • Sadies Ariel

            None of my sisters or brothers allow ANYONE to tell them anything involving their children. Their children are raised according to how my siblings see fit. Other people are completely irrelevant.

          • Dsru Bin

            So laws don’t apply to them?

        • jokergirl129

          Are you seriously saying it would have been okay for your sister to mistreat or even physically harm the movie employee just for doing her job and following the law? Because that is not okay at all!

          Also the OP never told the parents how to raise their kids. But because it was illegal for anyone under 16 to see that movie in NZ then the movie theater had to obey that law. Getting fined or even risk shutting down is not worth it. The father should have obeyed the law or waited for the movie to come out on DVD.

          • Sadies Ariel

            Yes. The employee clearly is not a freethinker, and as such, has no rights in our book. Society and humanity have not demonstrated that they are capable of free thinking. Apart from the small section that follow the same principles as my siblings, no one else matters. One day they will all be eliminated and free thinking will take over but it will take several hundreds, perhaps thousands, of years.

    • Vulpis

      That’s nice. Are you going to buy the movie theater at some point? This is *their* venue, or to phrase it a little differently, ‘their house’, so they get to enforce the rules handed down to them. You want to do something different in your home, that’s your choice…buy the home release of the movie and go for it. Just don’t go screaming at the store if it blows up in your face.

      • Sadies Ariel

        Had it been my sister, they wouldn’t have had to worry about it anymore. If she didn’t destroy it first, she would have bought their whole company.
        That’s exactly what they teach their kids. If you don’t like something, change it.

        • Ophelia

          Wait, what? I don’t exactly follow–“if you don’t like something, change it”? No mutual understandings, no agreements, no compromises, no accounting for the other side’s point of view? Just some Seto Kaiba or Flintheart Glomgold “I’ll ruin or own everything that gets in my way”? That sounds like a villain-style god complex.

          Buying the movie chain wouldn’t have changed the law in New Zealand either though.

          • Sadies Ariel

            Nope. Society and humanity have not demonstrated that they are capable of free thinking. Apart from the small section that follow the same principles as my siblings, no one else matters. One day they will all be eliminated and free thinking will take over but it will take several hundreds, perhaps thousands, of years.

    • Vulpis

      That’s nice. Are you going to buy the movie theater at some point? This is *their* venue, or to phrase it a little differently, ‘their house’, so they get to enforce the rules handed down to them. You want to do something different in your home, that’s your choice…buy the home release of the movie and go for it. Just don’t go screaming at the store if it blows up in your face.

  • Sadies Ariel

    TThat’s the f***ing stupidest thing I’ve ever heard of. My nieces and nephews were raised to be extremely independent, free thinking, and were allowed to make their own choices and learn by doing and seeing. They’re taught to not blindly accept anything, question, research and form their own opinions, and live their lives the way they see fit, because they are individuals and no one has control over another individual. My sisters and brothers only intervened in the most extreme circumstances, which were rare as the kids could either solve their own problems, ask the older ones for help, or ask for HELP figuring out the problem (never just expect one of us to do it for them). They’ve travelled around the world, experienced things in their childhood most people won’t in their entire lives, and are all at minimum, 5 years / levels above where traditional kids are. As a result, all 10 of them, aged infant to 12 years old, handle life better than most adults in their 30s and 40s.
    If ANYONE especially a “law” had tried to tell my siblings how to raise their kids and what they were and weren’t allowed to do, there wouldn’t have been a country to make “laws” anymore.

  • Cassia212

    I’ve known people whose parents allowed them to watch whatever R rated movies they wanted, bought them whatever M rated video games they asked for, etc. Those people were all douchebags. Still are, I assume.

    • Scott James Rasmussen

      I had parents like that and I turned out fine. I don’t see the issue.

      • Cassia212

        Did you really, though?

        • Scott James Rasmussen

          I’m a functioning member of society. I have no mental disorders. Full time job. Never killed anyone. I’m gonna say I turned out okay.

          • Cassia212

            Yeah that’s the thing though. If you asked any of the douchebags I’ve known whose parents left them to be raised by the TV and PlayStation they’d probably say they turned out just fine, too. So I really have no way of knowing if what you say is true or not.

  • Riviellan

    DEADPOOL IS NOT FOR KIDS!!!

    I know it doesn’t say it’s for Deadpool, but the only other one out is Old Man Logan…

  • joshua82

    What makes the man in the story a bad parent is not that he wanted to take his children to see “Logan.”

    What makes him a bad parent is that he yelled at the theater employee for complying with the law of their country, given that the theater could have been fined for allowing underage children into an age-restricted film.

  • Denton Young

    *shakes head* Some people need a Gillooly stick to the knee.This father is one of those people.

  • Kathy Plester

    It might be they knew their kids would be okay even with extremely mature content – some kids are like that even at 8, but the law is still the law. It doesn’t necessarily mean they’re sh*tty parents but it does make them sh*tty people. They were told it was the law and then they expected it to be broken for them. If any company did that, they’d be fined – maybe even be forced to close down. No customer is worth that no matter who they are or how much money they’ve spent at the establishment.

    • Vulpis

      Well, it can be said that they’re a sh*tty parent for trying to teach them ‘Laws don’t apply to me’…

      • Kathy Plester

        That is true – setting a bad example certainly does make them bad role models. Just not necessarily letting kids watch a higher rated movie *if* they know they can handle it.

    • Vulpis

      Well, it can be said that they’re a sh*tty parent for trying to teach them ‘Laws don’t apply to me’…

  • Kathy Plester

    It might be they knew their kids would be okay even with extremely mature content – some kids are like that even at 8, but the law is still the law. It doesn’t necessarily mean they’re sh*tty parents but it does make them sh*tty people. They were told it was the law and then they expected it to be broken for them. If any company did that, they’d be fined – maybe even be forced to close down. No customer is worth that no matter who they are or how much money they’ve spent at the establishment.

  • Lev Borovoi

    “Where does it say this?” In the laws of NZ. Also the law states that not knowing the laws does not free you from responsibility.

  • Katie Manning

    And you rewarded them by offering them passes to another movie… because? You’re part of the problem.

    • Dsru Bin

      They did pay money, so OP was trying to give them an “exchange”. I agree that they should not have offered the free upgrades

  • Scott James Rasmussen

    That has got to be the most asinine law I’ve heard. Why can’t the parents decide? I watched R rated films when I was 5. I played M rated video games when I was like 7. Some of my favorite movies when I was kid were the child’s play movies and the terminator movies. I loved GTA 3 when it came out and I was in 4th grade. I turned out fine. I was never “traumatized”. If a child cannot tell the difference between real life and fantasy there are bigger problems.

    • Dani Marie

      Your parents were idiots.
      So were all of the other adults who let you into those films and allowed your parents to buy those video games for you. 🙁

      • Scott James Rasmussen

        How so? It’s just a game or movie. I don’t see the issue. I was smart enough to tell the difference between real life and a movie or game. I turned out normal. All these kids who are coddled and prevented from experiencing the slightest violence or bad words are in for a rude awakening when the real world hits.

      • Scott James Rasmussen

        I was 9 years old and watched 3000 people die on live tv in my 4th grade classroom. That is far more traumatizing than any movie or video game.

  • Darth Pseudonym

    An 8 year old in Logan? Oooog, no, bad idea…

  • Cody Ranney

    If this is about Logan, I will admit I was very shocked at how bloody it got, but it didn’t feel out of place, after the initial shock it fit very well into the film, but yeah it would be more than a small child could handle and I condemn any parent who took a child to see it.

  • Kristen

    I saw parents bringing their toddler into this.

    Logan is a film I was glad to see ONCE, like Last of Us (a video game that is pretty much like Logan)