When They Feel They’re Entitled To The Price, But Not The Facts

, , , | Right | October 22, 2020

Part of being a car salesman is that we get phone calls from people browsing the Internet, trying to find the cheapest deal anywhere.

Me: “Thanks for calling [Dealership]. How may I assist you today?”

Customer: “I was looking on the Internet and found a [car model] advertised at a dealership in Massachusetts for $26,000. Will you price match them?”

Me: “Ma’am, that’s so far outside our market area that it’s not even funny. I’m in Oklahoma. Where are you calling from, and what’s the name of that dealership?”

Customer: “I’m calling from Colorado. The dealerships here all have their [model] priced at $30,000 or more and I want one for $26,000 like [Massachusetts Dealer] has advertised.”

Me: “Ma’am, I’m familiar with that dealership. If you scroll down on their page, you’ll see that they also say that to get the advertised price, you must trade in a 2005 or newer car. Then, if you look at their Google page, you’ll see that while they’ll sell you a car at such a low price, they will typically only give you $1,000 trade value for a $7,000 car.”

Customer: “But I don’t want to trade anything in. I just want you to give me that price. My local dealers won’t do it.”

Me: “Ma’am, since that price you want is more than $2,000 less than the invoice price of the [model], which is the hottest selling SUV on the market right now, how does it make any sense whatsoever for us to do this?”

Customer: “But I want it for $26,000.”

Me: “Good luck with that, ma’am. Have a nice day.”

I hung up then before I told her what I was really thinking, about people in a very hot place wanting ice water, too.

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