Very Bad Beer-havior, Part 2

, , , , | Right | October 20, 2020

One summer, the company decides to renovate our gas station, with extensive work being done on the outside of the building as well as inside, including new flooring and furniture for our sales floor. This means that we have to close the station for over a month.

On our floor, we have a little bit of everything, from food and drinks to cleaning supplies and hygiene products. During the renovation, everything will be removed from the sales floor, even the freezers.

Our storage space in the back is rather small and everything that does not fit in there will be stored in a container that will be outside for five weeks, without shade, during a hot summer, so the types of things we can put in there are quite limited.

A week before we close, we stop getting our merchandise delivery that normally comes twice a week and we discount many things that will expire soon after we will reopen in an effort to bring our stock down and avoid having to throw things away.

The plan for the reopening is that the furniture will be installed over the weekend, we will all come in and start stocking the shelves on Monday, and we will reopen with a fully stocked store the next evening after we stock our regular Tuesday delivery. But when the furniture is already installed by Friday morning, my managers decide on a change of plan: instead of all of us stocking on Monday, we will start Saturday and work in smaller groups. Since the computers are already running and we will be around anyway, we also open for customers with a limited service: they can get gas and all merchandise that is already on the floor, but nothing else.

I work Sunday morning. The night shift has already finished with the drink coolers, so I get started on the sweets. As many people don’t know we are already open, it’s slow, and even though we get much stocking done, many shelves and displays are still empty. Most customers are understanding and happy that we are already open. Around noon, a regular customer approaches me after checking the coolers.

Customer: “Hey, I can’t find the [Brand] beer!”

Me: “Oh, it’s in the first cooler, second shelf from the bottom.”

I show it to him.

Customer: “No, that’s the bottles. I want the cans! They are your buy-two offer this month!”

It’s the first of the month. I have not read the monthly offers yet as we have not hung up the advertisement posters and the register applies those offers automatically, but as we often have offers like that, I believe him. The spot in the cooler assigned to the [Brand] cans, however, is empty.

Me: “Yes, but as you can see, we are currently out of the cans. I am sorry, but we won’t get a delivery until Tuesday.”

Customer: “Then get me cans from the back!”

Me: “I am sorry, but I can only sell things that are out on the floor already. Also, the coolers are already stocked with all beverages we have right now. We just opened after being closed for over a month and our delivery won’t come until Tuesday, so we are short on some things.”

The customer glares at me, grabs some other cans of beer, and storms off to my coworker’s register. He slams the cans down and glares at him.

Customer: “I’ll have these cans. I wanted the [Brand] cans but you do not have them!”

His voice gets louder with every word and he keeps glaring at us. After he pays and leaves, my coworker turns to me.

Coworker: “What was that about?”

Me: “We don’t have any [Brand] cans right now.”

Coworker: “That’s it? We were closed for five weeks! We open three days early as a courtesy, which allows him to get beer today when almost everything is closed around town, and he kicks a fuss because we are missing one type of canned beer?”

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Very Bad Beer-havior

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