Trying To Make A Change Is Cents-less

, , , , , , | Right | October 10, 2019

(In Australia, we have 5-, 10-, 20-, and 50-cent coins, as well as $1 and $2 coins. It’s worth noting that 10 cent and $1 coins are roughly the same size, while $2 coins are noticeably smaller and 20 cent coins are noticeably larger. Cent coins are silver, while dollar coins are gold. A customer is paying for her groceries. She has handed me her cash and starts fishing around in her coin purse for the remaining 40 cents.)

Customer: “Hang on; I’ll give you the 40 cents.”

(She hands me two $1 coins and a $2 coin.)

Me: “Sorry, this is too much. I just need the $1. You can keep the rest.”

Customer: “I thought it was 40 cents.”

Me: “That’s right.”

Customer: “Then what’s the problem? That’s 40 cents.”

Me: “No, it’s $4.”

Customer: “I don’t understand. I’ve given you two 10-cent coins and a 20-cent coin. That equals 40 cents.”

Me: “No, you’ve given me two $1 coins and one $2 coin. That equals $4.”

Customer: “I don’t understand what you’re trying to tell me. That’s 40 cents, isn’t it?”

Me: “I’m sorry, but it’s not. Here, take these.”

(I hand her back the $2 coin and one of the $1 coins. She reluctantly takes them.)

Customer: “Okay, but I still don’t understand. This is wrong.”

(I put the money in the machine and handed her her receipt. She took it, grabbed her shopping, and slowly walked away, musing over the two coins still in her hand, clearly still not understanding.)

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