Trying To Bottle-Neck The Economy

| Working | February 19, 2015

(We are having a barbeque, but have run out of beer. My friend and I pick up a plastic box with 24 returnable 20-oz bottles in the car’s trunk and head to a bar near the house. In Brazil, we don’t usually have dedicated liquor stores; we can buy beer at markets or bars and get it to go.)

Me: “Hi! Do you have cold beer? I’ll need 24 bottles of [Beer].”

Cashier #1: “Sorry, buddy, my stock just ran out of [Beer]. You can check at the other bar, just across the street.”

(There is another bar, at EXACTLY the other side of the street. An advertisement outside the bar says ‘[Beer] only R$2.50 per bottle.’ The cashier of the second bar sees me crossing the street with the plastic box packed with empty bottles. He has the beer I want, and I have a guaranteed 24-bottles order.)

Me: “Hi, there! Your friend across the street said you have cold [Beer]. I’ll have 24 of them, please.”

Cashier #2: “Sure! It will cost R$2.70 each.”

Me: “Whoa… it says R$2.50 at that poster outside…”

Cashier #2: “That’s for small quantities. For large quantities it will cost more.”

Me: “Shouldn’t be the opposite? You should give me a wholesale discount!”

Cashier #2: “No. For large quantities, I’ll charge a little more. That’s the way it works.”

(The man was clearly trying to get some advantage from a drunk.)

Me: “Yep, you are right! I don’t want 24 beers anymore. I’ll take just one.”

(The man handed me one.)

Me: “Thanks. You know what? I think I want another one.”

(The man understands that I will do that 22 more times.)

Cashier #2: “Nah, okay… You win. I’ll give you a discount. R$2.40 each.”

Me: “Thanks… I may be drunk, but it doesn’t mean I am stupid!”

1 Thumbs
1,711