Think They Can Read You Like A Book

| Milford, MI, USA | Learning | September 15, 2014

(I’m in the third grade. I’m the quiet, bookish sort and I always have a book on me. While my classmates are still on picture books, I have long since picked up short chapter books. I have a brand new one to read for our silent reading time. Because it is new, I don’t want to keep it in my messy desk where it might get damaged. I keep it in my book bag for the morning and get it out on my way in from recess. We aren’t allowed to go to our bags at any other time during the school day. When silent reading is over I put the book at the corner of my desk, out of the way, and get my workbook out like I am supposed to.)

Teacher: “[Name], please put your book in your desk.”

Me: “I don’t want it to get damaged and my desk is messy. Can I go put it back in my bag?”

Teacher: “No. Put it in your desk. This isn’t reading time.”

Me: “I know it’s not. I just don’t want to damage my new book.”

Teacher: “Put it in your desk right now or I’m taking it!”

(I move a bunch of things to make a semi-safe spot for the book.)

Teacher: “[Name]! This is not desk cleaning time, either!”

Me: “I know. I’m just making room for the book.”

Teacher: “If you don’t stop mouthing off and disobeying I’m calling your mother!”

(Trying not to cry, I got back to work. When I go home that afternoon, I discovered that my teacher had called my mom and told her that I had been reading when I wasn’t supposed to and had repeatedly refused to stop and put my book away. Because my mom never believed a word I said over an adult’s, my new book was taken and I was forced to read from the class library (all picture books) for the remainder of the school year.)

1 Thumbs
597
VOTES