Their Observation Skills Need Some Work

| Toronto, ON, Canada | Working | April 2, 2017

(I work at the largest theme park in Canada. While the park is very diverse, I seem to be the only one of my religion in my store. This can cause problems when managers and team leads are not educated in my religion.)

Manager: *hands me sheet of paper with a calendar on it* “Can you work all of this week?”

Me: “I have to take May 30th and June 1st off but besides that I’m good.”

Manager: “Why?”

Me: “It’s a religious holiday; I’m [Religion] and on this holiday we have to stay up all night and study. I’ll be too tired to work June 1st.”

Manager: “But that’s Canada Day! We’ll be extremely busy.”

Me: “Sorry, I don’t control when [Religious Holiday] is.”

Manager: “I have friends who are [Religion] and I’ve never heard of that.”

Me: “I’m pretty observant. Most people only follow the high holidays.”

Manager: “Let me just check this out.”

(To my shock, he takes out his cell phone and proceeds to Google my holiday to make sure it is real. Please note that while no one in my store is my religion, Toronto has a large population of people who are my religion (like Bathurst and Lawrence – if you’re from Toronto you know what I mean.))

Manager: “It isn’t showing up on Google.”

Me: *leaning over his shoulder* “You spelt it wrong.” *spells it out for him*

Manager: “Oh! There it is. Do you really need this off?”

Me: “I am legally allowed to take certain days off for religious observance. It’s in my contract!”

Manager: *sighs* “But you’re one of our best employees.”

Me: “Great! Hopefully, I’ll still have that title when I come to work on June 2nd.”

Manager: *getting desperate* “You’ll get paid time and a half for working Canada Day.”

Me: “Well, some coworker will be very lucky, then!” *hands back sheet with calendar on it and walks away*

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