The Couponator 15: The Transaction Void

, , , , | Right | June 3, 2019

(I work at a popular retailer specializing in baby products. Every month a coupon flyer is mailed to the reward members, but anyone can print most of the coupons off of the website. In this month’s flyer, there is a car seat coupon. A customer and — I assume — her daughter and granddaughter walk up to my register and I notice they have a sheet of coupons which they have printed off of the website. They set the sheet down on the opposite end of my counter and make no further reference to it, which is the same thing customers do when they’re not buying anything to use the coupons on and want me to throw it away. Everything about the transaction is cordial and normal until after the customer has paid and I hand her the receipt.)

Customer: ” We didn’t get the discount on the car seat.”

(The customer bought a clearance booster seat that was already marked down to less than $15.)

Me: “Oh, I’m sorry. I didn’t realize you wanted to use the coupon.”

Customer: “Of course, I wanted to use it!”

Me: *glancing over at the sheet of coupons still lying at the opposite end of the counter untouched* “You didn’t hand me a coupon.”

(The customer now looks like I just told her the most ridiculous thing she’s ever heard, and is looking around at her daughter and the now long line of other customers behind her for sympathy.)

Customer: “Can’t you adjust it?”

Me: “Not at this register, ma’am, but if you step over to the service desk they can help you.”

(The customer looks over at the line at customer service and I can already tell that isn’t going to fly.)

Customer: “Why should I have to go stand in line over there when you’re the one that messed it up?!”

Me: “The only way I could help you is if a manager voids the transaction and I ring everything up again.”

Customer: “Yes, do that!”

(The customer then sees the long line of annoyed people behind her.)

Customer: “I just feel bad for all of these other people in line!”

(I went to get the manager, she voided the transaction, and it took everything in me to pretend to be remorseful and polite. The rest of the transaction went smoothly and the customer left in satisfaction of saving an extra $2 and not standing in line at customer service. Out of all of the nasty people I encountered at this store, this customer stands out the most. I think it was her refusal to take any accountability in the situation and how appalled she was that I didn’t read her mind!)

Related:
The Couponator 13: Coupons Of Purchases Past
The Couponator 12: The Special Competition
The Couponator 11: Barcode Of Duty

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