Takeout The Decision Making Process

| Melbourne, Australia | Right | August 29, 2010

(I’m a new waiter and I’m alone during an afternoon shift when a customer calls.)

Customer: “I’m [name]. I’d like to order my usual for takeaway.”

Me: “I’m sorry, sir, I’m new. Could you tell me what you would like to order?”

Customer: “My usual.”

Me: “I don’t know what that is, sir.”

Customer: “Just tell the kitchen that it’s for [name]. They’ll know what it is.”

Me: “Okay, but just in case they don’t know, could you tell me what your usual is?”

Customer: “Oh, they’ll know, I’m a regular.”

(He hangs up. Fifteen minutes later a man turns up in the restaurant.)

Customer: “I’m [name]. I ordered my usual over the phone.”

Me: “I’m sorry sir, the kitchen staff don’t know what your usual is so they weren’t able to make it.”

Customer: “But I’m a regular! They know who I am.”

Me: “They don’t. They cook whatever we tell them to cook. They never interact with the customers. If you would like to tell me what your usual is I could place your order.”

Customer: “Never mind.”

(Customer leaves. Later, I tell the manager what happened. The manager laughs and says that that particular customer always orders his usual which is whatever dish the staff member chooses for him.)

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  • Samantha Phastine

    The implication is that the customer didn’t even know about the fact that his ‘usual’ is never the same.

    In which case, why couldn’t the OP have asked their manager? At least spared them this much headache.