They’re All Upcharged Up

, , , , , , | Right | March 7, 2019

(While at grad school I work the overnight shift at a cheap hotel chain. Rooms are about $50 a night, but there is a coupon for $39.99 in a popular hotel coupon book that’s available all along the interstate. It clearly states on the coupon that this is only for non-renovated rooms, and that there is a $5 upcharge for the renovated rooms. One night I have this conversation.)

Customer: “Hi. I’d like one of your coupon rooms, please.”

Me: “Okay, we are currently sold out of our non-renovated rooms, so is a renovated room okay for the $5 more?”

Customer: “What? No. Your coupon says $39.99. That’s what I want.”

Me: *resisting the urge to sigh because this is a common argument and it’s one am* “I’m sorry, but those rooms are sold out. I can give you a renovated room for $44.99.”

Customer: “This is ridiculous! I’m calling your corporate office and reporting you for false advertising!”

Me: “It clearly states on the coupon that—“

Customer: *flips phone open and dials corporate, glaring at me*

Me: *soldiers on* “The renovated rooms are a $5 upcharge.”

(I give up, because I know how this will go with corporate; it’s happened before, though, granted, not with the customer standing right in front of me while calling.)

Customer: *talking on the phone to corporate* “Hello. I’m at your hotel in Syracuse and they won’t honor a coupon from this coupon book. Yes, I’ll hold.” *continues to glare at me*

(The hotel landline rings. I pick it up, looking steadily back at the customer.)

Me: “Thank you for calling [Hotel]. This is [My Name]; how can I help you?”

Corporate: “Hey, this is [Corporate] from corporate. We just got a customer complaint about a coupon?”

Me: *still looking steadily at the customer* “Yes, as I explained to the customer, the room that the coupon refers to is sold out for the night. We do have renovated rooms available at a $5 upcharge from the coupon price. It explains that on the coupon.”

Corporate: “Okay. I’ll let her know, thanks.” *hangs up*

Me: *hangs up*

Customer: *obviously just taken off of hold* “Yes, I’m here.” *I can faintly hear corporate repeating word for word what I’ve now explained three times* “Fine.” *hangs up* “I’ll take a renovated room.”

Me: *smiles* “Of course.”

Screaming Headband-ers

, , , , , | Right | February 7, 2019

(I’m autistic and have bad anxiety. After a few hours of nasty customers, I’m physically shaking and doing all I can to keep from having a full-blown panic attack. I go to retrieve some carts from the parking lot to get away from customers for a bit when a car starts honking at me and the driver is yelling to get my attention. The sudden loud noise causes me to scream like a banshee. My instinct is to run and hide somewhere, but since the point of a car horn is to alert people to potential danger, I go over to see if someone is hurt and I need to call an ambulance.)

Me: “Did you need something?”

Driver: “Yeah, do you guys sell headbands?”

Insecure About Storing Her Money Securely

, , , , , , | Right | December 3, 2018

This happened while I was working at a friend’s mom-and-pop pizza place. We were running short of ones and change so I had to run to the bank next door to get some.

Understand that this particular bank was — as a teller there once mentioned to me — used as a training site for new teller hires for all the local company locations. Since it was in a down-scale neighborhood, it tended to have more than its share of “problem customers,” so if you could handle yourself professionally there, everywhere else was a breeze.

Anyhow, I’m standing in line and the lady in front of me says she wants to withdraw $50 from her checking account. But she doesn’t have any checks with her. Or the account number. Or any ID. And despite claiming “she banks here all the time,” no one working there recognizes her.

When the lady teller tries to politely explain why she needs to go home and return with at least an ID, cue the five minute screaming rampage about how “racist” the bank, the teller, and everyone else working here is, and the only reason she can’t get “her” money is because she’s [race]. Throughout this the teller remains perfectly polite, but adamant that she can’t do what the lady is requesting.

Finally the screamer storms out, and I get to do my business. The teller looks a bit frazzled, so as we’re talking I compliment her on staying calm, and tell her she did exactly the right thing. In fact, that if she HAD allowed the “customer” to perform such a sketchy withdrawal, I would have worried about how secure MY account there was.

Ridiculous Regulars

, , , , , | Working | November 25, 2018

(I work at a donut and coffee place. There is one customer who always demands two turbo shots — espresso shots — but is only charged for one at $0.99 each. She has a very specific request on how to make her iced coffee correctly. She pulls up into our drive-thru.)

Customer: “Large iced caramel coffee with a large turbo shot.”

Me: “Okay, your total is $5.13.”

Customer: “Excuse me. That is not what I ordered.”

Me: “I apologize.”

(I recite her order back with same total.)

Customer: “That price isn’t right. I am a regular; where is the manager?”

Me: “I apologize, but the manager has left for the day.”

(By this time my coworker is telling me she is a regular and always gets said order. The customer pulls up, fuming. I open the drive-thru window and I am met with cursing and ranting about how I am doing my job incorrectly. I apologize and make her coffee.)

Customer: “That is not how I want it.”

Me: “This is the way we are taught to make an iced coffee.”

Customer: “I don’t get ice first; it’s the large turbo shot that is first. You aren’t giving me a large.”

Me: “Ma’am, again, I apologize, but I cannot put a hot beverage in a plastic cup, and I could be burned. You only wanted to pay for one of the turbo shots. I cannot give you a large without you paying for it, as I will lose my job.”

Customer: “Where the f*** is [Coworker]?”

Me: “She is currently with a customer at the front counter, if you would like to come in.”

Customer: “WHY THE F*** WOULD I COME IN IF I AM IN THE DRIVE-THRU?!”

Me: “Again, I apologize. Please do not yell at me. [Coworker] is busy, and I also have other customers waiting in line.”

Customer: “I DON’T GIVE A D*** WHO IS WAITING! I AM A REGULAR AND I GET WHAT I WANT EVERY TIME.” *drives off*

Coworker: “She is our regular, and the manager gives her what she asks for.”

Me: “Why? She still has to pay for what she wants. We can actually lose our jobs for incorrectly or not charging someone.”

(Weeks go by and I avoid this regular like the plague.)

Manager: “Hey, so we had a complaint from one of our regular customers that you did not serve them what they wanted. She also has your work schedule.”

Me: “Excuse me. She has what now? She also should be charged for her large turbo shot like everyone else.”

Manager: “Well, [Coworker] says you wouldn’t give it to her. She also is the one taking photos of your schedule and giving them to the customer.”

Me: “That is illegal. She is not an employee or management and should not have that information. It is clearly a safety issue.”

(I actually got suspended for saying how wrong it was because I did not give this regular something she did not pay for. I was told I was wrong for feeling unsafe with some stranger I didn’t know having my schedule. This happened a year ago and I am still speaking with a lawyer about how this company did nothing for their employees and their safety.)

They Either Complain There Are No Signs, Or Too Many

, , , , , | Right | September 21, 2018

(A couple comes up to the register with some jewelry-making supplies and I give them their total.)

Customer: “This was $1.74! It said that it was $1.74 over there!”

Me: “Okay, can you show me? Because if it was in the wrong spot, I can—”

Customer: “It wasn’t in the wrong spot! I even scanned it at one of the price checkers and it said $1.74!”

(She takes me over to the price checker.)

Customer: “As you can clearly see—”

(She scans the item. The screen on the price checker says $2.49.)

Customer: “That said $1.74 before! I swear to God, it said $1.74!”

Me: “Well, let’s go over to where you found it and see if there was a sign put up by mistake or something.”

(We go over to where she found the item. It is clearly marked $2.49, and there are no sale signs. She grudgingly accepts that she was wrong and goes back to the register. I give her the total, but she and her husband are not happy with it.)

Customer: “Why aren’t these all 50% off? There was a sign there that said 50% off!”

Customer’s Husband: “You can even see it from here! There’s a 50%-off sign!”

Me: “I’m pretty sure the sale is only on beads. I was just over there, and there was no sign in that panel. I can go over and show you if you want.”

Customer’s Husband: “How about this? How about we just don’t buy anything, and leave?”

Me: *pause* “Okay?”

Customer’s Husband: “This is unbelievable! You’ve got all these signs in that general area, so that should mean that everything there is 50% off!”

(My manager has been at the register next to me this whole time and overhears this.)

Manager: “Our signs are put up panel by panel, sir.”

Customer’s Husband: “DON’T GIVE ME THAT!”

(The two of them walked out without buying anything. I told them, quietly enough so that no one would hear, to have a terrible day.)

 

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