Credited For Trying

| NC, USA | At The Checkout, Money, Time

(I’ve been working since pre-opening hours and it’s close to closing time. I’m expected to ask customers if they would like to apply for the store credit card.)

Me: “Would you like to apply for the credit card and save 10% off your first purchase with it?”

Customer: *looks at her daughter, who nods* “Yeah, I’ll do it.”

(I proceed to sign her up for the card and finish my end of the process.)

Me: “Ma’am, the system says you weren’t automatically approved for the card tonight, but you’ll be getting a notification in the next few days about it, and once you’re approved, you’ll receive your 10% on your next purchase.”

Customer: “What? You lied to me! You said I’d get 10% off this purchase. I’m a manager at [unintelligible mumbling] and we would never falsely lead a customer into such traps. I want you to give me my 10%! I want a manager.”

Me: “I’m sorry for the confusion, ma’am. You get the 10% when you’re approved, but I can get my manager if you like.”

Customer: “Oh, forget it! I don’t want you to waste anymore of my time here. I only applied for the 10% otherwise I wouldn’t have wasted the time here. Don’t just stand there! Finish ringing everything up.”

(I finished the transaction in silence. She and her daughter stormed off with their $17 purchase. The 10% wouldn’t have saved them $2.)


In Line And Out Of Line, Part 14

| USA | At The Checkout, Bad Behavior, Popular

(I am at a store with my father. We are standing in the line for a self-checkout. It’s a five person line and all the machines are in use. One opens up and the first customer, a young woman, moves to the checkout. The second customer, an old man who hadn’t been in the line, steps in front of her and goes to check out his groceries.)

Father: “Hey, the line starts right here.”

(He motions to the spot behind us.)

Customer #2: “I have to check out my groceries.”

Customer #1: “So do the rest of us, and none of us skipped past the line.”

Customer #2: “My groceries are more important!”

Me: “By what standards?”

Customer #2: *to Father* “Didn’t you teach your kid to respect his elders?!”

Father: “Not when they’re being a**holes.”

In Line And Out Of Line, Part 13
In Line And Out Of Line, Part 12
In Line And Out Of Line, Part 11


Just Bladerun With It

| AZ, USA | Geeks Rule, Movies & TV, Popular, Technology

(I am working the reception desk. I am often told that I should be a radio announcer or a voice actor, because my ‘phone voice’ is so nice. I am also known as the office nerd, able to recite lines from a plethora of geeky films and shows.)

Me: “Thank you for calling [Store]. This is [My Name]. How can I help you?”

Caller: “Oh, is this a machine? Or are you a person?”

Me: “No, ma’am. I am a Nexus-series Replicant made by the Tyrell corporation. More human than human is our motto.”

(Fortunately, the caller had seen Blade Runner and got a good laugh from it. My normal coworkers rolled their eyes so hard their retinas detached.)


Tip More Than Just My Hat To You

| TX, USA | Awesome Customers, Awesome Workers

(I work at a pretty well-known electronics retailer that has been around for a long time. Every now and then we will get several customers asking for technical advice on old technology. One afternoon, an older gentleman comes in, walks to the counter where I am and takes out an old flip phone.)

Customer: “I can’t seem to get this useless thing to come on. I’ve tried everything!”

Me: “Let me take a look at it.”

(Customer hands me the flip phone. I hold the “end” button to power on the device. When that does not work, I figure the battery is dead so I proceed to plug in a spare charger we keep behind the counter. Lo and behold, the device comes on.)

Me: “Looks like it just needed to be recharged!”

Customer: “What did you do?”

Me: “It just needed to be plugged in.”

Customer: “That’s it? Wow! Thank you so much! How much do I owe you?”

Me: *smiling* “Free of charge!”

Customer: “Well, let me at least tip you for the trouble.”

Me: “No need; I’m just happy I could help.”

Customer: “Let me at least buy you lunch. I insist!”

(The older gentleman then laid $7 on the counter and left before I could decline. Made my day.)


America’s Debt Crisis Explained, Part 3

| Waleska, GA, USA | At The Checkout, Extra Stupid, Money, Technology

(I work in a store that sells some food items and accepts EBT food stamp cards. A woman comes in with a cart load of groceries and I ring up her items, including one box of baking soda. We sell both the kind you cook with, and the kind strictly for deodorizing/cleaning, and it states clearly on the box it isn’t for cooking (and is located in the cleaning section of the store.)

Me: “Your total is [amount].”

Customer: “I’m using EBT.”

(She slides the card and pays for the transaction. The system automatically charges just the food, leaving the small amount for the box of baking soda.)

Me: “That’ll be [amount], please.”

Customer: “What?”

Me: “For the baking soda; it’s [amount].”

Customer: “No, it’s food. I want it on my EBT card.”

Me: “I’m sorry, ma’am, you picked up the kind for cleaning. It’s not meant for cooking with. See—” *I show her the label* “—I’d be glad to go and get you the correct one, but unfortunately once the payment process has begun, the only way to complete it is to pay the remaining balance, or cancel the order.”

Customer: “I don’t want it then. Forget it. I just want to go. I paid for my food.”

Me: “I’m sorry, ma’am, but I either need the [amount] owed, or I need to cancel the order and ring it in again. It won’t take but a minute.”

Customer: “Fine.”

(I proceed to cancel the transaction. In order to put her money back on the EBT card she needs to put in her pin again.)

Me: “Okay, just put in your pin to cancel, please.”

Customer: “Why? I don’t want to be charged again; just cancel it.”

Me: “Ma’am, I’m sorry but to cancel it the money needs to go back on your EBT card. You need to put in your pin number to authorize that.”

Customer: “I don’t understand! I already put in my pin! I don’t want to be charged twice; just cancel it!”

Me: “I can’t cancel it until you put in your pin. I’m sorry. It won’t charge you twice, but your pin is giving us the authority to put your money back on your card.”

(Finally her daughter, exasperated, puts in the pin for her. I then ring up her items again, this time leaving out the baking soda.)

Me: “Okay, the total is now [amount], please.”

Customer: “What? I already paid. I’m not paying again!”

Me: “Ma’am, you paid once, but then didn’t want the baking soda, so I canceled the transaction and credited the money back into your account for your entire purchase. That’s why I had to ring it all in again.”

Customer: “I already paid! I’m not paying again!”

Me: “Ma’am. I rang up your items, then you slid your card and paid for the food items, but not the baking soda. The only way to fix this was to cancel the entire transaction and credit the money for the entire purchase — all the food — back onto your account. Like doing a refund. You did pay, but I gave the money back, not just for the baking soda, but for the entire thing. So you haven’t yet paid for these groceries.”

(The customer seems to understand and slides her card. When it asks for her pin she flips out again.)

Customer: “I already put my pin in twice! Why do I have to do this again! How many times am I being charged!?”

Me: “The first time you put in your pin was to pay the amount for the groceries. The second time was to authorize us to refund that money back into your account. This third time is to buy the groceries again. You’re only paying once, since we refunded the first purchase.”

(The customer got upset, refusing to “be charged a third time.” Finally her daughter, again frustrated and wanting to leave , put in the pin. The woman continued to question why she had to put her pin in as her daughter tried to shove her out the door. She came back twice to ask again why she had to put her pin in so many times. Finally her daughter succeeded in leading her out, casting me an apologetic look as they left.)

America’s Debt Crisis, Explained, Part 2
America’s Debt Crisis, Explained

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