Right Working Romantic Related Learning Friendly Healthy Legal Inspirational Unfiltered

Acting Age-Appropriate

, , , , | Right | August 6, 2021

I go to a local bottle shop that I’ve frequented before to pick out some wine, beers, and whisky.

While I am twenty-eight, people tend to mistake me for much, much younger. When I graduated university last year, many thought my “graduation” referred to high school. I have found, however, since getting new glasses and getting my hair cut, along with wearing sleeveless shirts — essentially showing off my arm tattoos — I’ve not been mistaken for a child any longer. This occurs while I am at the register, paying for my purchases.

A group of young guys comes into the store. Each is holding a skateboard and they are all kind of scruffy. One in particular is in the lead; the others appear to be following him.

Cashier: “Fellas, can I see your IDs, please?”

Lead Scruffy Guy: “What the h***? We haven’t even tried to buy anything yet!”

Cashier: “The minute you step into a bottle shop, you have to prove you’re old enough to be here. ID, please.”

They complain amongst themselves as I pay for my purchases. They focus their attention on me.

Lead Scruffy Guy: “Did he ask you for your ID?”

Me: “No.”

Lead Scruffy Guy: *Looking very angry* “Well, why not? That’s so unfair!”

Cashier: *Cutting across them* “Because she, unlike you, looks like she’s over twenty-five! Anyone who looks under needs to be ID’d. If you have no ID, I must ask you to leave.”

The guys look at me as if trying to judge my age. I look the lead guy right in the eye.

Me: “I’m twenty-eight.”

The guys start complaining, but seeing the cashier isn’t going to budge, they ultimately leave as none have ID on them and they cannot prove their ages. The cashier looks at me, seemingly mortified. 

Cashier: “I’m so sorry about that. I don’t mean to say that you look old, just…”

Me: “Mate, until recently, people have thought I’m still in high school! Trust me when I say that someone thinking I look my actual age is the biggest compliment I can get.”

The cashier just smiled at me, relieved that I wasn’t offended, and I left the shop with a cool story to tell my friends.

Take A Pregnant Pause To Reconsider Your Ideals

, , , , , , | Right | July 28, 2021

I used to work for a Christian retailer for many years, and whoo-boy, could I tell some stories. This one sticks in my mind, however.

One of my coworkers, a young unmarried female, fell pregnant — a bit of a no-no to our customer base. To assist her, she was retrained for a different department which had limited contact with the shop floor. One day, however, she needed to get something from the counter and a female customer spotted her.

Immediately, the customer exclaimed:

Customer: “Oh, you’re pregnant! That’s so exciting! Your husband must be so pleased.”

I could see my coworker have a mini internal struggle as to whether she should lie or tell the truth. She chose the latter and advised the customer that she was not married.

The customer’s countenance immediately changed and she began raging about sin and how terrible this girl was, etc. I bee-lined over right away and politely asked my coworker, now close to tears, to please pop out back for a moment as the manager was looking for her.

As soon as she left, I whirled on the customer and let fly.

Me: “How dare you judge that girl! You have no idea the circumstances surrounding her pregnancy! She may have been raped for all you know! Or divorced. Or any number of things. You have no right to judge her whatsoever.”

I let fly for a few more moments before the customer, who at least now looked properly chastened, left the store.

As soon as she left, my manager popped out from the next aisle, having heard the whole thing.

Manager: “You know, I technically should reprimand you for speaking to a customer like that.” *Pauses* “I won’t, though. Well done.”

We never saw that customer again.

Some People Just Want To Watch The World Burn, Part 8

, , , , | Right | June 18, 2021

I have recently started six weeks of placements with a paramedic crew as part of my university studies. I soon begin to purchase coffee for the two paramedics I am working with when I get my own cuppa before each day shift. I usually go to an independent local coffee shop that is open from 5:30, where the staff are super friendly and personable and will often have a joke or a chat with every customer who comes through the door. After about three early starts, the senior paramedic on shift holds his cup up and stares at it after I hand it over.

Paramedic: “Is this from [Coffee Shop]?”

Me: “Yes?”

Paramedic: “Ugh, I hate it there.”

Me: “Not a fan of their coffee?”

Paramedic: “Nah, their coffee is fine, but they’re always so f****** cheerful there.”

Me: *Laughs* “See, that’s part of why I like it there.”

Paramedic: *Starting to grin now* “I can’t stand it! Look, I just want to walk in and buy coffee. No one should be that f****** happy that early in the morning. I just don’t trust it. They should be miserable!”

There’s just no pleasing everyone, is there?

Related:
Some People Just Want To Watch The World Burn, Part 7
Some People Just Want To Watch The World Burn, Part 6
Some People Just Want To Watch The World Burn, Part 5
Some People Just Want To Watch The World Burn, Part 4
Some People Just Want To Watch The World Burn, Part 3

You Can Cut Your Hair But Not The Commentary

, , , , | Working | May 21, 2021

I’m a woman in my thirties with very short hair. The last few years, I’ve gotten super into buzz cuts and it’s been my choice of style since.

A few days ago, I decided my hair was getting too long — and by that, I mean that it’s really what most people consider “short” — so I went to a men’s barbershop that also does women’s hair providing they get a “men’s” style. When I told the guy what I wanted, he proceeded to ask me five times if I was sure that I wanted it buzzed. He even shaved a tiny bit and said, “This is the length it’ll be.”

I told him I was sure, I’d had it shorter, I wanted it buzzed, etc. He finally did it but commented the entire time about how short it would look.

When it was done, he held up the mirror to show me the back and I nodded, smiled, and said I was happy with it. His response?

“It’s too short.”

I get that some people don’t like women with super short hair. But if I’m paying for a service and tell you I’m 100% fine with it, maybe just do your job and do it how I’m paying you to do it?

Common Courtesy Isn’t So Common, Apparently

, , , , , | Friendly | March 31, 2021

A new Italian cafe has opened not far from where I live — a fifteen-minute walk — and I decide to check it out by myself for breakfast. When I get there, I see that there aren’t many smaller tables; the ones they do have are filled and there’re only large tables left. It’s the type of place that does table service, and the woman working on the door directs me to a six-seater.

About five minutes later, a family of five comes in. They look around in dismay to notice that there’re hardly any free large tables; they all have one or two people sitting at them like I am. Because the table I’m at is right near the entry, I can hear their conversation as they debate whether they should leave.

I haven’t ordered yet, and I decide that this won’t do; I’m a single person and they’re a family who have come out for a nice breakfast. So, I get up and tell them that they can take my table — where there’s more than enough room for them — and that I’ll find somewhere else. The family looks shocked, and the mother thanks me twice. The staff asks if I will be okay sitting at one of the bench-seat-style tables — one has another lone person at one end, so I would be at the other — and I say yes. I’m sat and served a coffee and rather delicious bruschetta, with the staff alternating between thanking me for moving and apologising for the inconvenience of moving. Before I pay and leave, the woman from the family runs up to me and thanks me, again.

Seriously, do people not do nice things for others anymore? Moving tables as a single person isn’t a huge deal, especially when you’re given a huge one, but the staff and family acted like I’d done this massive thing for them. To me, it seemed like the sensible — and right — thing to do. Why would a single person need a six-seater, anyway?