Putting That Problem To Embed

| FL, USA | Working | April 19, 2017

Recently, we have been working on expanding our audience through social media and digital publications. The director of our nonprofit signed off on this project, which entailed two new positions and a suite of stock photo and web services products. We start integrating social media embedded posts and share links into many of our online publications. One day, the director starts urgently calling and emailing, and ends up yelling at us in person about something “seriously wrong” with a recent story. He keeps saying that the link in the story is broken and no matter where he clicks, it takes him off the page and he can’t figure out how to go back. He also keeps asking why we added “such crap” to the story after he signed off on the content. This all rings alarm bells, and we’re desperately checking the page to see what happened to the code or if someone hacked the site.

Not seeing anything wrong, we ask him to demonstrate. He furiously goes to his computer, opens the story, and clicks on an embedded tweet, which launches Twitter in a separate window. “Why are we including THAT?” he shouts, pointing at some rude comment replying to the original tweet. “And why can’t I read the rest of the story?”

We try our best to explain that he is now on Twitter, he can close the new window, and he’s seeing replies to the Tweet we linked to, not anything that we chose to put online. He doesn’t understand and insists that we remove the offensive comment. Eventually, we just had to stop using embedded tweets because he freaked out each time and could not understand that we can’t control comments on a site that’s not ours.

Doesn’t Have The Complete Picture

| Cleveland, OH, USA | Right | November 16, 2015

(I’m an editor for a design-related publication, and received this phone call:)

Caller: “I have photos. Where do I send them to?”

Me: “What is this regarding?”

Caller: “I have photos of our new facility.”

Me: “So you’re looking to submit an article for consideration?”

Caller: “I don’t have an article, just the photos.”

Me: “Well, in order for you to pitch an article, you would need to send us the information about the facility.”

Caller: “Don’t you write the article?”

Periodic Bathroom Breaks

| Vista, CA, USA | Working | July 21, 2015

(I am the only female shift lead in the art department of a coupon magazine. My supervisor comes to me with a request:)

Supervisor: “Can you go ask [Female Coworker] why she is making a lot of trips to the restroom?”

Me: “No.”

(I guessed at the reason why, but I wasn’t going to say it.)

Supervisor: “You have to; you are the lead. I need to make sure she’s not on drugs.”

(I just stare at him. Not wanting to get into an argument with him about the legality of the question and his reasons, I go find my coworker. I explained to her what he asked. Luckily she has a pretty good sense of humor.)

Me: “So, you want me to be obnoxious in my answer?”

Coworker: “Go for it.”

(At my desk, from across the room from my supervisor’s desk, I yell out:)

Me: “Hey, [Supervisor]! [Female Coworker] is on the rag, hence the numerous restroom trips!”

(He never asked me to do that again…)

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And Whose Fault Is That?

, , | Right | February 6, 2008

Me: “Welcome to [Magazine]. How can I help you?

Customer: “Hi, we just got a bill for an ad in your fall issue and I thought we had already paid and our contract was over.”

Me: “Let me get the insertion order.”

(I get the order.)

Me: “It says here you’ve signed up for a full year contract including our fall and winter issues.”

Customer: “But we’re not even open in the fall or the winter.”

Me: “But you signed for the contract.”

Customer: “Well, I didn’t read what I was signing…”

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