Right Working Romantic Related Learning Friendly Healthy Legal Inspirational Unfiltered

Refunder Blunder, Part 56

, , , , , , , | Right | September 7, 2021

I’m working the register at a second-hand store when an older man walks in carrying a leather jacket with one of our store’s tags on it. We haven’t been letting customers try things on in the store for health reasons; however, we are more than happy to refund or exchange things if they get them home and they don’t fit, as long as the customer has the receipt and keeps our price tag on.

Me: “Hi, how can I help you?”

Customer: “I bought this yesterday, but it doesn’t fit. I want a refund.”

Me: “Sure thing. Do you have your receipt?”

Customer: *Slightly irate* “No.”

Me: “All right, did you have a loyalty card with us?”

Customer: *Getting angry* “No. Why can’t you just refund it?”

Me: “I just need a receipt in order to process the refund.”

Customer: *Almost yelling* “Just give me the money. I only bought it yesterday.”

Me: “If you only bought it yesterday, I can probably find the receipt in the system. Do you remember what time you were in?”

Customer: *Snapping* “You know what? Forget it!”

He throws the jacket at me and storms out. At this point, my manager arrives, having seen the last part of this conversation. I tell him what happened.

Manager: “You know, he fits the description [Coworker] gave of a man who walked out wearing a leather jacket while she was busy. I just assumed we wouldn’t see that jacket again. If he comes back, could you call me?”

He didn’t come back that day, but he did come back the following day while I wasn’t there. Apparently, he started verbally abusing [Coworker] about our prices, so the manager banned him from the store.

Related:
Refunder Blunder, Part 55
Refunder Blunder, Part 54
Refunder Blunder, Part 53
Refunder Blunder, Part 52
Refunder Blunder, Part 51

1 Thumbs
326

Unmasking Your Scheme

, , , , | Right | September 3, 2021

I am selling tickets to a baseball game. Masks are only required outdoors in my state for the unvaccinated. We are not checking everyone’s vaccination status, but as discounted youth tickets are only available for those under twelve, and kids under twelve can’t get vaccinated yet here, the assumption is that everyone buying a youth ticket will need a mask. Two adults and one child come up to the ticket window.

Customer: “Two adult tickets and one youth ticket, please.”

Me: “How old is he?”

Customer: “He’s eleven.”

Me: “Then that will be [price] and he will need to wear a mask.”

Customer: “Oh. He’s actually twelve years old and vaccinated. I just said he was eleven to get the discount.”

Me: “Okay, then that will be [higher price].”

1 Thumbs
361

CopyWrong

, , , , | Legal | September 2, 2021

Once upon a time, I got a letter from a copyright troll “threatening” me — it was carefully worded NOT to meet the legal definition of a threat, but yeah, it was a threat — with a lawsuit for copyright infringement I hadn’t committed. I even checked the provided IP address against my own logs and found that it didn’t match with any of the IPs I’d had with the ISP I had been with since before the time of the alleged infringement.

I contacted them, and they told me they were absolutely certain I was guilty and that I should pay up the €800 they were demanding as compensation. I told them I was not going to pay compensation for something I didn’t do. I posted my story on social media, instead. The troll contacted me again about being aware of my social media posts on the matter, hinting at taking separate legal action because of it, I just laughed because it’s not libel if it’s true.

I filed a formal request with my ISP for a complete record of the IP addresses I had had in my time with them so that if the copyright troll tried to take me to court, I’d have documentation to prove my innocence.

The law regarding this sort of request defines, in detail, the manner in which the request must be done — which I complied with to the letter — and what the options for the personal information registry owner are; either the ISP provides the requested information free of charge, or they reply with a written letter detailing their reasons for not complying with the request. I got neither. Instead, I got an email telling me they “didn’t consider” my IP address history to be the kind of information they are required by law to hand over free of charge, but that they were happy to provide the information I had requested for a price of something like €50 per hour of work compiling the information, a minimum charge of half an hour.

I called them and the representative I talked to said the email was correct. When I mentioned how the consumer protection ombudsman had stated that it actually WAS the kind of information an ISP must hand over free of charge.

Representative #1: “Well, that’s just an opinion.

No, it really isn’t. The closest it is to an “opinion” is in the sense that a supreme court ruling is “an opinion.”

Me: “Are you saying you refuse to hand over the information as required by law?”

Representative #1: “No, nothing like that. We are more than happy to provide the information, for a price.”

I hung up and went on social media, telling about my experience with their illegal behavior and tagging the ISP in the post. A week later, I received an email from high up in the ISP’s food chain.

Representative #2: “We have changed our policy regarding your kind of information request. If you still want this information, we can have it mailed to you in a few days.”

Naturally, I said yes and got something like fifty pages of IP logs in the mail. As I already knew, none of the addresses matched with what the copyright troll had claimed had been my IP address at the time of the alleged infringement.

However, the copyright troll never bothered me again after I got a government-paid attorney to write a letter to them on my behalf.

I am with another ISP now. My only regret is that, while the reps I dealt with on the matter above broke the law, for the most part, their customer service was better than my current ISP’s. Then again, my current ISP is well-known for defying market court rulings requiring them to hand over names and addresses of their customers to copyright holders, meaning even if I did do that sort of thing, for the foreseeable future the copyright trolls will never get my personal information again.

1 Thumbs
301

If You Want To Keep It Private Then Ship It Yourself

, , , , , | Right | August 31, 2021

I work at a print shop/office supply store that serves as a shipping and drop-off location. I’ve finished typing in the sender and receiver information and I’m moving onto the security features. Every shipping has this.

Me: “Would you mind giving a declared value of the contents? We need to know for insurance purposes.”

Customer: “Why do you need to know?”

Me: “For insurance purposes.”

Customer: *Hesitantly* “Let’s say… um… a thousand dollars.”

Me: “All right, and could I get a description of the contents? Just to make sure we aren’t shipping anything illegal or hazardous.”

Customer: “I kind of feel like this is an invasion of my privacy.”

Me: “Well, I’m sorry, but I can’t ship it unless I know what is inside. If it’s documents, you can just say documents; you don’t need to be specific.”

Customer: *Hesitantly again* “Let’s put down… computer.”

We couldn’t ship the computer anyway because of the lithium battery, but I want to ask the third security question.

Me: “Before we can ship this out and have you pay for this label, I’ll need to see a valid ID. We use this for legal purposes and making sure customers are liable for the contents of the package.”

Customer: “Oh, you know, I left my wallet in the car. Could you ship it without my ID?”

It’s suspicious to not bring money in for something he knew he was paying for.

Me: “Sir, we can’t ship this package out unless you pay for it and show me a valid ID.”

Customer: “You know what? This was a s***ty service today. I’ll just go somewhere else for this. I hate my privacy being under attack.”

Me: “Um… okay… You can leave, then.”

I kind of wonder why he was so hesitant to say both $1,000 and a computer. It didn’t even weigh that much, and the size of the package wouldn’t have had room for a desktop or laptop.

1 Thumbs
353

Lying To The Bank Is Always A Bad Choice

, , , , | Learning | August 30, 2021

A long time ago, before computers were common, I worked at a college. Many students needed to verify grades and attendance to the sources of their financial assistance. In some cases, they had to pay money back.

A young guy came in with an older guy, presumably his father.

Young Guy: “I need a letter stating I was enrolled during the most recent semester.”

Me: “Just fill out this form.”

He filled out the form and I printed something off of the microfiche. (Really!) The guy looked at the paper.

Young Guy: “No, I need a letter saying that I attended the last semester.”

Me: “I can only print a transcript.”

I looked at the transcript and realized he didn’t attend the semester in question.

Young Guy: “Can’t you just say I attended?”

Me: “No, I really can’t.”

As they walked away, I heard:

Dad: “I told you so!”

1 Thumbs
363