Charity Begins At (Selling Things From) Home

, , , , , | Working | September 27, 2017

(My friend run a small business and, on occasion, they have special events that include renting out market stalls. They take bookings ahead of time, but on this occasion, one of their regulars hasn’t arrived so there is an empty table. The rent they receive goes to a charity. I am helping them out in their main shop when one of their staff members comes over.)

Staff: “Hey, [Owner], I thought the table next to my shop was for [Regular Stall Holder]?”

Owner: “It is; she’s not arrived yet.”

Staff: “Well, some woman has just sat down at it and started putting out items, and has been asking people to buy them.”

Owner: “I’ll come over and take a look; maybe [Regular] asked her to start setting up.”

Staff: “There’s nothing there that she would normally sell.”

(A few minutes later the owner comes back, he is fuming.)

Owner: “What is wrong with people? This woman saw an empty table and decided to set her own stall up. I asked her what she was doing, and she told me she wanted to sell her things. I told her that she needed to pay rent for the stall. She refused to do that because ‘it’s a charity event and the tables should be free.’ So, I asked how much of her takings she would be donating, and she told me that she isn’t going to donate anything because she is selling her own things.”

(Stall holders were also donating a percentage of their sales towards the charity. They ended up kicking her out and sitting one of their volunteers at the table with their own stock.)

Your Dealing With The Safe Is Not Safe

, , , , | Working | September 18, 2017

(We have to work a late night, so we decide to have some food delivered to our office for our staff.)

Me: *grabbing my purse* “How much do you need towards the food?”

Manager: “No, you paid last time; this time it’s my treat.”

(The next morning, it’s my manager’s day off, and I am supposed to be in charge, but the manager comes in to finish up some projects. I do the daily safe check and find it’s short by $100. I usually do this at the end of the day, but have decided to do it at the beginning.)

Me: “Ah, there’s a problem. I just counted the safe three times and it’s $100 short.”

Manager: *sly grin* “Oh. yeah, I used it to pay for the food last night… is that all right?”

Me: “Uh… no. You know [Security] is coming in today and will probably do an audit.”

Manager: “Well, I don’t have it; I’ll go to the bank after I leave.”

(Another manager and I had to empty our wallets to make up the missing money. If I hadn’t caught it, there would have been a chance of the other manager and I being fired and charged with theft. We made the first manager pay us back.)

Worth Checking What Was Just Said

, , , , | Right | September 16, 2017

(I am a cashier at a store that sells cigarettes, lottery, and fireworks, all of which you must be over 18 to buy. Our store follows the 30-law [if you appear under 30, we must check your ID] for all of these items. One day had a guy walks in and looks at the fireworks.)

Guy: “I’ll take these ones, please.”

Me: “Sure. I just need to see your ID.”

Guy: “No problem. Can I also get a pack of smokes?”

(He hands me his ID. The first thing I do is check the picture to be sure it’s him. The card has all the security features. I then check his birth year.)

Me: “According to this, you are not 18 yet.”

Guy: “Wow, you actually checked! I have never had anyone call me on it before!”

Me: “You never get ID’d?”

Guy: “All the time. But normally I give it to them and that’s good enough!”

An Operatic Failure

, , , | Right | September 15, 2017

(While I usually work in the head office, I have colleagues who travel to fairs and offices of our clients to see how they are doing and push sales. I get an email from my colleague in sales telling me about a client who got a travel package offer from us, which he forwarded to another travel agency in order to get a better price for the package from them. This is considered okay, but impolite in this business, since you normally keep prices and offers between business partners. Although I was using my best prices for his offer, the client tells my colleague that the other agency can offer him an almost 10% cheaper price, and he wants us to match this price for him in a new offer. I call my coworker.)

Me: “Well, I don’t know how [Competitor] did it, as they have the same services as we do, but they beat our price and they can offer it 10% cheaper. I’m sorry, but I absolutely cannot match that without losing money. It seems like this business is gone for us.”

Coworker: “Okay, well, what can you do? I will inform the client. You can release all the reservations for the opera. Thanks a lot!” *click*

(After a few days she calls again.)

Coworker: “I have the client on the phone again. He demands to speak to you, because I can not give him the information he needs.”

Me: “Sure, just put him through!”

Customer: “Hello?”

Me: ” Yes, hello, this is [Name] with [Company]. How can I help you?

Customer: “Your colleague told me that you cannot match the price of [Competitor].”

Me: “That is unfortunately true. Despite trying my best, I am unfortunately not able to match their pricing. I am very sorry that you book via [Competitor] now, and I hope that you give us another chance next time. I already released all pre-bookings for the opera that I made for you, so you do not have to worry about those.”

Customer: “But I want to book with you, can’t you just match the price of [Competitor]? I really want to book with you, and the offer is including the same services, it’s just the price.”

Me: “I am really sorry, but I can’t. And even if I could, the tickets are most probably gone now, since the piece is very popular, and it’s probably sold out by now. “

Customer: “Are you saying that I just lost the opera tickets?! I already booked the flight tickets for my client and cannot cancel any more! The opera was the only reason my clients wanted to go!”

Me: “I am sorry, but didn’t you say you have an offer from [Competitor]? Doesn’t he have tickets reserved for you?”

Customer: “Well, of course I don’t! Don’t you know the concept of a bluff?”

Me: “So, you told us you had another offer, but in reality just wanted to get a cheaper price by tricking us?”

Customer: “Well… yes! That is how business works!”

Me: “Sir, I am sorry, but this is not how it works. At least not if you want to keep on working with us. Good luck getting tickets with [Competitor].” *click*

The Same Old Scam, I Kid You Not

, , , , | Right | September 15, 2017

(I cashier at a small mom-and-pop place in a fairly small town, nowhere near any major cities. On this day, two kids approach my register with a handful of various cheap candies.)

Me: “Well, hello there! Is this everything for you?”

Kid #1: “Yeah!”

Me: *totaling their purchases* “Okay, that comes to $9.59 exactly.”

([Kid #1] hands me a $10. I set it down on the counter while punching it into the register.)

Me: “Okay, and out of $10, that comes to—”

Kid #1: “I gave you a $20!”

Me: “Excuse me?”

Kid #2: “He gave you a $20!”

(There is a pause as I stare at them in confusion.)

Me: “Uh, I’m sorry, but no, you didn’t.” *I pick up the $10 bill* “This is all you gave me.”

(Now the kids look confused.)

Kid #1: “But… the other boys at school said if we tell you we gave you a $20 you’ll give us more money back.”

(My heart sinks as I now realize what these kids are trying to do.)

Me: “I see. Well, first off, let me tell you what you did wrong. You’re supposed to wait until I put the money in my register and give you your change before you say anything.”

(Both kids’ faces light up.)

Kid #1: “Ooooh! That makes more sense!”

Kid #2: “Yeah, can you give us the $10 and let us try again? We’ll get it right this time!”

Me: “Well… no, because second off, what you’re trying to do is basically steal from the store. You’re trying to trick me by lying to me, and take money from the register that isn’t yours. That’s money the store needs to buy stock, pay bills, and of course, give me my salary.”

(Both kids faces now turn shocked.)

Kid #1: “Oh… sorry! We didn’t know, honest!”

Me: “I know you didn’t. Just might want to tell the boys at school what they’re doing is wrong.”

Kid #2: “Can we have the $10 back? We need it to go see a movie.”

(I handed back their money and voided the purchase. They left, hopefully now wiser and better, while I shook my head that apparently this well-known scam had spread so far that even the kids in my little “Nowheresville” town were being told about it and how to pull it off.)

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