Locker Stocker

, , , , , | Working | January 12, 2019

(It’s the day before a planned inspection and audit. One of the things we were warned about was that our lockers would be inspected, and if any stock was found inside it would be classed as theft and dealt with accordingly. I have two days off, including the inspection day. There is a staff member who is constantly trying to get me into trouble, but the manager doesn’t believe she purposely does it. As I am getting ready to leave work, my manager asks me to come in the next day to help finalise a few things.)

Me: “Sure thing. I can be here at ten, if that’s okay?”

Manager: *standing in front of lockers* “That’s great. Now let’s get out of here.”

Me: “Oh, I almost forgot my jacket. It’s in my locker; could you pass it to me? It’s unlocked.”

Manager: *opens my locker* “Very good — a nice empty locker.”

(The next morning I get in and go to my locker, and I find that it has been stuffed full of stock.)

Me: “Uh, [Manager], could you look at this, please?”

Manager: “What the…? I know your locker was empty last night.” *starts pulling out the stock* “I saw [Coworker] carrying these half an hour ago; I told her to put them away”

Me: “So, she put them in my locker?”

Manager: “Oh, she probably didn’t do it on purpose. You know we use the top row of lockers for storage.”

Me: “My locker isn’t on the top row, and it has my name written on it.”

Manager: “There’s no way she would do that on purpose. I don’t know why you can’t get on with her.”

(A couple of weeks later, the coworker decides to also take her wrath out on the manager, and after being pulled up on it, she walks out, sending a nasty resignation letter to try and get the manager into trouble. Three days of a lovely, peaceful workplace pass when the manager comes up with this gem.)

Manager: “You know, I think that [Coworker] was the cause of all the trouble around here.”

Me: “You think?”

Coming From An Anti-Trust Fund

, , , , | Legal | January 11, 2019

(I’m working as a cashier in a computer retail store. I haven’t had much experience with scams at the register. The policy is that if a card does not go through the card reader, we can enter it in manually, but if it’s still rejected a phone number will automatically pop up on the registers for us to try and call to authorize the purchase with a code they give us. A lot of the time this will happen if it’s a large, out-of-the-ordinary purchase. This gentleman comes up to purchase multiple Apple products worth $5,000.)

Me: “Okay, your total is [amount]. How would you like to pay?”

Scammer: “Oh, I have this credit card, but it’s not like a normal credit card. It’s for a trust fund, so I’ll have to call my bank on my phone and they’ll give you the authorization number.”

(Red Flag #1.)

Me: “Oh, um, okay, let’s just run it through the normal way and see what happens.” *runs card but it’s denied*

Scammer: “See? I told you. Here. I’ll call my bank and they can give the okay.” *begins to dial*

Me: “I’m sorry, but I can’t talk to your bank on your phone; I have to go through my system. Let me try it manually.”

(I go through the steps, calling the number on my register to give the information. The customer is beginning to get more and more agitated as the time goes on. The card is denied again.)

Me: “I’m sorry, sir, but your card has been declined. Do you have another form of payment?”

Scammer: “No, I already told you this isn’t like a normal card.” *starts shoving his phone in my face* “My bank is on the phone right now; talk to them!”

Me: “Sir, that is not how we can authorize cards. I cannot verify who is on the other end of your phone.”

Scammer: “Get me your manager! I’m trying to spend my good money here!”

(The scammer goes through the same song and dance with my manager. My manager backs me up, denying the customer.)

Scammer: *throw his hands in the air* “Fine! FINE! You just lost a customer; I’m never coming here again!” *storms off*

Me: *under my breath* “No, please, come back and steal from us!”

(I was commended for standing my ground and not giving in to him.)

A Churn Rate Debate

, , , , | Right | January 11, 2019

(I work for a cell phone provider, primarily setting up new lines of service. I have two trainees sitting with me so they can listen to live calls.)

Me: “Hi. Thank you for calling. How may I help you?”

Customer: “I need to reconnect my wireless home phone? My home phone? The phone? It was disconnected today, and I need to reconnect it. You can do that? Right? You can do that? I want my activation fee waived, too. Speak to your supervisor, yeah? Your supervisor will waive it?”

(The whole time, it sounds like he’s talking with one breath, extremely fast.)

Me: “Well, let me see. May I have a phone number on your account?”

(He then proceeds to list off ten different numbers, all without taking a break. Finally, I get one that pulls up an account. Even if a line is disconnected, we can still see it on the account. There are at least sixty disconnected home phone lines. In the minute it takes me to pull up his account, he is continuously saying, “Hello? Hello?” despite me reassuring him that I’m still on the line. I pull up his notes on the account, and he has been adding on the home phone, getting the activation waived, and then removing the line two to three days later. This has been going on for at least five months. In fact, last time it happened, it happened to my coworker. An instant disconnect is known as churn, and if it happens enough, you can be fired, so I’m extremely hesitant to even do the order.)

Me: “Sir, can I ask why you disconnected your phone today? I see it was just added on two days ago. I also see that this is a frequent pattern on your account. Is there a residual issue with your phone? We should be able to fix any concerns.”

Customer: “Well, to be honest, I thought it was going to be too expensive. I know better now. Can you waive my activation fee? Go to talk to your supervisor. Can you waive my activation fee?”

Me: “I will try, but you’ve received at least $180 of credit this month alone. Is the phone going to remain active, or are you planning on disconnecting it?”

(For the first time since we started speaking, he goes quiet. After about thirty seconds he speaks again.)

Customer: “Yes. Tomorrow.”

(My trainees started laughing, just bewildered. I told the customer I was going to place him on a silent hold, and went to speak with my floor support. They told me we couldn’t waive the activation fee, and to flag down his account for fraud because they thought there was more going on. By the time I got back to my desk, he had hung up. I wasn’t gone for more than two minutes. The trainees told me that the entire time, he’d kept saying, “Hello? Hello? Hello?” without faltering once. I noted the account to not give him any more credit, and as I was filing the claim to send to our fraud investigation team, I noticed that someone else had added on his home phone and given him a credit, and the customer had already disconnected it again.)

Treating The Whole Industry Like A Game

, , , , | Working | January 10, 2019

(I work in video game publishing as a producer. Part of my job also involves evaluating the pitches we receive, and highlighting any that are particularly noteworthy and worth discussing further. One guy is adamant that he wants to pitch his game to me over a call because he says it’ll give him a chance to really “dive into details.” This is already sort of a red flag; refusing to send us a proper pitch document through the channels makes him sound like a bit of a handful that could be difficult to work with, but I decide to give him the benefit of the doubt and grab a call with him. He describes his game, shows me some VERY simplistic and cheap-looking screens, and, well…)

Me: “I’m sorry, but… honestly, that’s just [Insanely Popular Indie Game]. Literally everything you’ve said just makes it sound like a copy, from the characters to the plot details to the mechanics.”

Caller: *dismissively* “Everything is inspired by something.”

Me: “No, this is literally a copy. Note for note, just with different art and names and wording essentially.”

Caller: “Well… you can see that because you’re a professional, ma’am.”

Me: “No, I can see that because I have eyes. [Caller], it’s clear you put a lot of work into this, but I would urge you to channel that into an original project s—“

Caller: “Listen, listen! You’re thinking too small. People will eat it up, anyway. This sort of thing happens all the time.”

Me: “Not at our company, it doesn’t.”

Caller: “So, do you want to cut me an offer or not?”

Me: “Not!”

(While I was annoyed at having my time wasted, I was also amazed at how brazen he was with this completely transparent rip-off. We have had clones of varying quality pitched to us over the years, all of which we also passed on, but this one really took the cake. The cherry on top; he DID send over more documentation later, regardless, and one of the items on his budget was 50k USD to “clear personal debt and improve focus.” It’s been several years and I haven’t seen hide nor hair of his “work.” Guess other publishers have eyes and integrity, too. Who’da thunk it?)

The Sinister Six

, , , , , | Right | January 10, 2019

(I am the only cashier at closing. Half a dozen elderly women are shopping when I announce over the intercom that we are closing in fifteen minutes. None of them come up to the register. I make the next announcement at five minutes until closing. No one comes up to the register. Sighing, I wait, and at nine pm sharp, I make the final announcement that we are now closed. Of course, this is the moment that all six women came up with their items and form a line. This seems too orchestrated to be a coincidence, which confirms in my mind that they are all friends. One of the women further down the line calls up to me.)

Customer: “Is there someone else who could help to check us out?”

(I stare at her in disbelief. I hold her gaze for a long moment. I shake my head slowly.)

Me: “Not at this time of night. It’s just me.”

(It took a beat, but then the whole line shifted and sighed, resigned. I wonder if their logic was that, if they waited until closing to pay, the employees would be motivated to get them out of the store faster by opening lots of registers to speed up the process. Thankfully, as it sank in that their clever ploy to avoid a long line had failed, I heard no more complaints from the customers. All but one of the register drawers had already been closed down, and the managers on duty were in the back room, counting the change. I knew that my two managers, both tired after shifts that are always longer than the cashiers’, would take about fifteen minutes to get new drawers ready. There was no point calling them for backup, so I dealt with the line on my own in fifteen minutes.)

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