Right Working Romantic Related Learning Friendly Healthy Legal Inspirational Unfiltered

“You Can Accept Your Family Or You Can Be Alone.” Well Said.

, , , , , , | Related | September 23, 2021

My sister-in-law is trans. She introduced herself at a small family dinner at my house, after telling me and my husband what she wanted to do. There were some mixed emotions, some confusion, a lot of loud words, and many, many tears. [Mother-In-Law] was the loudest, screaming about the sin [Sister-In-Law] had committed, about how she was a man, and about how no one would accept her as she is. [Sister-In-Law] got kicked out of her house and came to live with my husband and me.

A few weeks after [Sister-In-Law] moved in, [Mother-In-Law] dropped by unannounced with a box of things belonging to [Sister-In-Law]. They were damaged and, judging by the smug look on her face, [Mother-In-Law] was responsible. [Sister-In-Law] asked if we could say she was out so she didn’t have to deal with any of it right away.

Mother-In-Law: “Where is [Sister-In-Law’s Dead Name]? I have his stuff.”

Husband: “Who? Oh, [Sister-In-Law] is—”

Mother-In-Law: “[Sister-In-Law] isn’t real. I gave birth to [Sister-In-Law’s Dead Name]. Is he upstairs?”

She walked toward the stairs but I blocked her.

Me: “[Sister-In-Law] isn’t here. If that’s all, I’ll walk you out.”

Mother-In-Law: “I have a right to see my son!”

Husband: “I’m right here.”

Mother-In-Law: “No, you know I mean [Sister-In-Law’s Dead Name].”

Me: “[Sister-In-Law] isn’t available. You can leave now.”

Mother-In-Law: “Sinners!”

She took a swing at me and connected, scratching the side of my face and grabbing my hair. It took everything in me not to hit her back. [Husband] intervened and pulled us apart. He had a firm grip on his mother’s arm as he escorted her out the door. 

Husband: “You can accept your family or you can be alone. The choice is yours.”

He shut the door in her face as she tried to come back in. I think I actually heard her connect with the door. I suffered no long-term effects from her attack. [Sister-In-Law] still lives with us but we haven’t heard a peep from her mother.

And A Slight Sprinkling Of Homosexuality

, , , | Right | September 14, 2021

I’m working as a waitress. Our restaurant has a small booth table which only seats two people, so it usually contains couples on a date.

I am serving two girls sitting at this table, and they each order a small bowl of ice cream.

On a whim, I ask:

Me: “Would you like sprinkles on your ice creams?”

[Girl #1]’s eyes light up and she enthusiastically answers.

Girl #1: “Yes!”

We all laugh a little, before [Girl #2] suddenly exclaims:

Girl #2: “We’re not lesbians, though!”

“Sprinkles = lesbians” turned into a long-running inside joke with my coworker, after we spent the rest of the night wondering what prompted her to clarify their sexualities.

She So Didn’t Ace This One

, , , , , , | Romantic | August 6, 2021

I’m a cis female. I go with some friends of mine to an LGBT bar to celebrate my friend’s birthday, and we’re all dressed up for it. The bar is also a popular place for LGBT people to hook up. I’m at the bar to order a drink when another woman approaches me.

Woman: “Hey, listen, you’re really cute. I know you’re here with a group of people, but do you want to hang out with me, instead? See where the night goes?”

Me: “Thanks, but I’m not interested.”

The woman very quickly gets put out.

Woman: “Wait, are you straight?! Because these bars are supposed to be a safe place for gay people.”

Me: “One, I’m not making it any less safe. Two, I’m not straight.”

Woman: “You’re not straight?”

Me: “No.”

Woman: “But you’re not a lesbian?”

Me: “Bit of a jump from ‘not interested’ to ‘not a lesbian,’ but no. And I’m not bi, either, before you guess.”

The woman is looking very confused by this point, but the bartender who is returning with my drink nods to my wallet: a flag made of black, grey, white, and purple stripes.

Bartender: “She’s ace, love.”

Me: “Aromantic, as well. Shoot for the moon if you want, honey, but you’re going to be lucky if you make it to Wollongong.”

But seriously, who sees that someone who is clearly there with a group of friends and celebrating, and decides, “Surely this individual will want to hook up!”?

Thank You For Being A Friend (And An Amazing Uncle!)

, , , , , | Related | August 3, 2021

I don’t recall my exact age when this story happened, but I know that puberty came much earlier for me than my peers and that I was presumably in the very early stages of it at this point, as I’d just recently started to consider the idea of dating and romantic (or sexual) attraction.

This new attraction confused me a bit, mostly because I found myself as attracted, or perhaps more attracted, to other boys as I was to girls. I grew up in a more conservative area and so didn’t realize that there were people who weren’t heterosexual out there yet.

My parents had a close friend who visited semi-regularly. He would often take time to spend with me as well, to the point that he was almost like an uncle to me. One day, he was in the living room talking with me while my parents were busy doing something elsewhere in the house.

Friend: “So what about you? Do you have yourself a girlfriend or boyfriend yet?”

Me: “What did you say?”

Friend: “I asked if you were dating anyone.”

Me: “You said, ‘boyfriend’?”

Friend: “I said girlfriend or boyfriend, whichever you have.”

Me: “Boys can’t have boyfriends.”

Friend: “Sure, they can! Most boys prefer to date girls, but some boys end up preferring to date other boys, just like some girls end up dating other girls.”

Me: “Why do they date boys?”

Friend: “That’s just who they like to date. Everyone is different and likes different things, right? You like vanilla even though I know chocolate is much better. Same thing with dating — some just feel happier dating other boys instead of girls.”

Me: “How do they know?”

Friend: “What do you mean?”

Me: “How do they know they want to date other boys?”

Friend: “Oh, well, I’ve never been gay — that’s what they call boys that only date other boys — so I can’t really say for sure. I mean, can you explain how you knew you liked racing games more than other video games? It’s just something you figure out because it’s what you enjoy and like doing. Like, if you close your eyes right now and picture dating someone, are they a girl or a boy?”

This question was a little too on the nose for me. I panicked a little, not wanting to admit that I’d probably pick a boy, so I lied.

Me: “I don’t want to date anyone!”

Friend: “Oh, girls all have cooties, right? Well, just for the record, whenever you do decide to date someone, your parents and I would love to meet them, whether they were a girl or a boy.”

I remember thinking that day that he was staring at me like he saw through me and already knew I was lying. For years after that, whenever any topic about dating or sex came up, he seemed to make a point of saying, “girlfriend or boyfriend,” and generally making it clear that he would be supportive whichever I ended up dating. I never knew if he would have done that anyway or if he was doing it specifically because he suspected I was gay.

He was the first person to suggest to me that being attracted to the same sex could be okay, and his continuing to hint that he would be supportive of me even if I was gay was honestly a real help as I struggled to identify, and admit to myself, my own sexuality. It was good to know that at least one person would be my friend no matter what.

I ended up being somewhere between gay and bi; I’ve had relationships with both sexes but generally, I’m a bit more attracted to men. When I finally came out officially, the friend was right; my parents were fully supportive of me. As to their friend, his response basically boiled down to, “I knew it, and I’m glad you’re finally ready to come out to us.”

I don’t know how long it would have taken me to even realize that non-hetero people existed without him, or how difficult it would have been to come out if I didn’t know I had someone supporting me through it.

Bigots Can Be Such A Drag

, , , , , , | Friendly | July 31, 2021

My family and I are visiting the USA for a family holiday. Before this trip, my sister and I have never been to North America before in our lives. We live in the UAE, which is located in the middle east. My family is biracial; my dad is German/Brazilian and my mum is Indian. I’m bisexual, and the rest of my family is straight.

We are in the streets of New York, our final destination. This trip has simultaneously been the best and worst we have ever been on. It’s about 12:00 pm and some drag queens avidly speaking in Spanish walk by us, and a nearby man turns to speak to my father.

Man: “Can you believe those f****** [gay slur] [Mexican slur]s? This is why we need the walls — to keep the immigrants out of here.”

Dad: *Smiling* “That’s exactly my thought; the indigenous people need to finally take a stance. I mean, after what your ancestors did to them, it’s only common courtesy for you to go back to Europe.”

Man: “How f****** dare you?! My family built this country! Take your [Mexican slur] wife and kids and get out of here.”

Mum: “I’m from India.”

Man: *Pissed* “Whatever. You’re probably both [gay slur]s.”

I finally speak up.

Me: “No, that’s me.”

Surprisingly, he did not want to talk to us any longer, but the drag queens, who had heard everything, came up to us after and thanked us for standing up to him. They even bought my sister and me a hotdog!