Doesn’t Know How To Politely Decline

, , , , | Working | October 11, 2017

(I am 23, at an interview for my job as a technical service rep for a copier company, which means I would go to the customers in the field to fix copiers. They have 21 people complete a written test. Of those, seven are chosen for interview and at the end, one is hired, all within the same day. Of the first 21, I recognize one of my former classmates, who was somewhat on the “wild side.” Since I’m fresh out of an industrial electronics course, the technical tests go easy. Then the interview: Two men are bombarding me with questions.)

Interviewer: “I have you and someone else, equal; I don’t know which one to choose. I go see one of your pals and I ask him why should I choose you over the other one; what would they answer?”

Me: *thinks for a moment* “Because I’m the best of the two.”

(It’s a job interview. You have to sell yourself. They silently take some notes. To me, it seems they simply want to know how sure of myself I am. That is fine. A few hours later, I get a call that I have the job. A couple of weeks later, I happen to see that former classmate. He comes to me and congratulates me on the job.)

Former Classmate: “Did they asked you that weird question about you and someone else being equal and stuff?”

Me: “Yes.”

Former Classmate: “What did you answer?”

Me: “That I was the best of the two. Why? What did you answer?”

Former Classmate: “I told them to ask me questions that made f****** sense.”

Me: *dumbfounded* “Wow… Well, see ya.”

(About a week later, I happen to meet one of the men that was interviewing. I ask him if he remembers someone answering something like that to that question.)

Interviewer: “Yes, I do remember.”

Me: “What did you do?”

Interviewer: “We put our pen down, asked a few questions to be polite, and as soon as he left the room, we put his file down the trashcan. Can you imagine someone with this behavior dealing with customers?”

(For the record, I worked for that company for over ten years before being laid off following cutbacks. As for that other guy, although he had somehow managed to get a diploma in industrial electronics, he found a job as a janitor at the local mall.)

That Explains The Vacancy

, , , , | Working | October 10, 2017

(I see an ad inviting people to apply for a job in person, so I go.)

Clerk: “Hello… can I help you?”

Me: “Yes, can I have a job application?”

Clerk: *very blankly* “What?”

Me: “A job application?”

Clerk: *loooong pause* “Job application. Okay.”

(She hands me one, with a pen and instructions to fill it out. I thank her and go and sit down. I fill it out and approach the desk again.)

Me: “Hello?”

Clerk: *looks straight at me and leaves*

Me: “Um? Hello?”

(She ignored me, so I just put it down on the desk and left. Honestly, if they hired her, I won’t be too unhappy if they decide not to call me!)

Can You Please Delay Democracy?

, , , , | Working | October 9, 2017

(I am hiring people to do a single day of work handing out literature at polling places on election day. I get this question from roughly 20% of people who applied.)

Applicant: “I’m not able to work on election day; could I possibly be scheduled for a later date?”

Should Slide Right Past That Fact

, , , | Learning | September 29, 2017

(I am at a group interview for a supply teaching position at an international school. The job asks us to put together a slideshow about ourselves and tell why we would be a great fit for the school. The first person goes, and he does a pretty good job. He’s a bit quiet but is obviously very educated, and it looks like it is going well. That is, until he gets to the last part of the slide, that makes me do a double take.)

Teacher Candidate: *What I think I hear him say:* “…and another reason why I think I would do well here is that my girlfriend is a student here.”

(I immediately stiffened up and looked closer at the slide to see if I really heard what I thought I heard. It turns out that he said his girlfriend WAS a student here, but that didn’t make it that much better, especially considering he was in his late 20s and she was a recent graduate. I eventually got hired at the school and worked there for two years, but I never saw him again.)

Wearing Me Out

, , , , | Learning | September 28, 2017

(At a “How To Get A Job” course, we’re talking about interviews and how to dress for them.)

Lecturer: “How do you know how to dress to suit a given job?”

Student #1: “You could call and ask.”

Student #2: *mimes holding a phone* “Hi. What are you wearing?”

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