Sometimes Those Do Require Some Management

, , , , , | Working | August 18, 2017

I’m working one day when a high school-age girl walks in and hands me a filled-out job application. Despite the fact that we don’t require a resume to apply here, she’s gone ahead and stapled one to the application. I thank her and duck into the back to put the resume on the manager’s desk.

Despite myself, I risk a peek at the girl’s resume. She has a previous job at a different fast food restaurant listed under “job experience,” and it looks as if one of her prior duties was “managing afternoon shifts.”

Unfortunately, she left the “f” out of the word “shifts.”

She didn’t get the job, but we all had a good laugh over the typo.

Email Failed To Get A Job

, , , , | Working | August 15, 2017

(I call a possible employee with a job offer. She had listed her cell phone as the best means for communication. I call her three times with no answer and I send her two emails. I do just about everything but literally knocking on her home address. After a week of no replies I move on to the next person on my list. Two weeks later the girl who didn’t answer my multiple phone calls and email comes into the store.)

Woman: “Hi, my name is [Woman] and I’m just checking in on my application.”

Me: “Oh, yeah… I tried calling you and emailing you to offer you a job and you never replied.”

Woman: “Oh, wow, really? I’d love a job! This is so unexpected—”

Me: “No, no. I wasn’t offering you a job. I mean, I WAS, but you never replied so I went to the next person on my list. Here’s a tip: if you’re expecting a job offer, check your email and cell phone regularly, especially if you list them on your resume.”

Woman: “Well, I’ve been getting a lot of telemarketing calls so I don’t answer calls anymore.”

Me: “What about email? I emailed you twice.”

Woman: “I’m worried about viruses.”

Me: “Okay. So listen, these are common worries but if you’re this type of person, then don’t list cell phone and email as main ways of communicating with you.”

Woman: “Well, my mom told me I had to. I’d prefer FaceTime-ing or Skype.”

Me: “The only time I’d EVER FaceTime a possible employee for a job is if they live far away, which you don’t!”

Woman: “So… no job, right?”

(No, she didn’t get the job.)

Interview Drama

, , , | Working | August 14, 2017

(I’m interviewing candidates for a role, I have already seen their CVs and have picked out the best of the bunch. All they have to do it impress with their personality and answer some simple questions.)

Me: “So why did you apply for this role?”

Candidate: “Well, I have always wanted to work in engineering.”

Me: “Really? Okay, that’s interesting. Well, this is a new field for you; what makes you think you have the ability to perform in this role?”

Candidate: “Well, my degree will really help me.”

Me: “Your degree in…” *I check papers* “…drama? How… would… that help you?”

Candidate: “I… err. Well…”

(It turned out that they couldn’t answer simple questions about their own CV, and more likely than not made a lot of it up. We went with someone else.)

Designing A Bad Interaction

, , , | Learning | August 2, 2017

(At my university, there are regularly events where different companies can come and students can inform themselves, e.g. to find a place for an internship or to see if they’d like to start working there. It’s only my second semester, so I’m really just informing myself and not looking for an internship yet. I study media informatics, which is basically a cross between computer sciences like programming and media design with more artsy subjects.)

Me: “Um, hi. Could you tell me a bit about your company? I’m studying media informatics and would like to know if I could work there.”

Worker: “Hmm, sorry, but we don’t really need someone with design.”

Me: “Oh, okay. Well, media informatics also has programming though?”

Worker: “No, sorry. Maybe in marketing, but I doubt it. We do have an IT department, but we need programmers, not designers.”

Me: “Well, in the higher semesters, we can decide to mostly focus on programming, like normal computer sciences.”

Worker: “As I said, maybe in marketing, but we don’t really need designers.”

Me: “I’m planning to focus on programming, though, not design.”

Worker: “Oh, hmm, I don’t know. Maybe. You can take a brochure with you, but I kind of doubt it.”

Me: “Okay… thanks anyway.”

(Please, if you’re there to inform students, actually LISTEN to what they tell you they do! Because that’s now definitely a company I won’t want to work for, be it IT or marketing.)

This Questionnaire Is Not Always Hopeless

, , , , | Working | June 19, 2017

(I’m applying online for a job at a chain pet supply store. There’s a pretty exhaustive application process, including a long list of statements you have to mark on a 1-5 scale from “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree.” Most are pretty typical for an entry-level retail job. For example, “I work best as part of a team” or “I appreciate constructive criticism from my superiors.” And then…)

Application Questionnaire: “When I look at the world around me, I feel little or no hope for mankind.”

(For the record, I marked “moderately disagree.” I never did hear back about that job, and not taking a screenshot of the question is one of my great regrets in life.)

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