They’re Not “Torn” As To Which Student To Pick

, , , , | Learning | October 12, 2017

(I’m studying broadcasting, hoping to get a job in radio. In one of our projects, we have to design a contest for the college radio station, then actually go out into the real world, meet with real businesses, and get them to sponsor it. I’ve got a meeting with a prospective sponsor, so for an extra air of professionalism, I decide to wear my suit. On my way out, I run into one of my instructors in the hallway.)

Instructor: “And what are you all dressed up for?”

Me: “Oh, it’s for the promotions project. I’m off to a meeting with a potential sponsor.”

Instructor: “Well, I’m glad one of you guys knows how to dress to make sales calls.”

(Yeah, turns out my classmates giving their presentations in torn T-shirts weren’t doing so well at rounding up sponsors.)

A Shocking Piece Of Journalism

, , , , | Learning | September 27, 2017

A Shocking Piece Of Journalism

 

High School, USA

 

(I am reporter for the school newspaper. I am assigned to interview several teachers on what their first jobs were, before they finished school and became teachers. Most of the jobs are pretty standard: food service, landscaping, there was one teacher who was a live-in nanny, etc. Then I decide to interview our school’s wrestling coach. He is an older man with a big personality, so I think for sure he will have had an interesting first job.)

Me: “Thank you for letting me interview you, Coach. Can you please tell me about the first job you ever had?”

Coach: *thinks for a minute* “I was a fish shocker!”

Me: “Huh?” *thinking I heard him wrong, though what could you possibly mistake for “fish shocker”?*

Coach: “Yeah! A fish shocker!”

Me: “I… uh… I need more details.”

Coach: “I’d set up this device at the lakes, and shock the water so all the fish would float up to the surface.”

Me: “And why did you do that?”

Coach: *slaps the top of his desk and laughs* “So they could be counted, of course! They’d wake up eventually and swim away, so we had to count fast!”

Me: “Uh-huh, okay, great. Anything else?”

Coach: “Nope, that was it.”

Me: “Well, thank you. This should be an interesting article.”

(Later, while writing the article, I did some research and figured out he was talking about electrofishing. At the time, I had no clue that was an actual thing someone could do for a job. We featured the coach’s story in the article and for a couple of weeks, kids went around saying they were going to be “fish shockers” when they grew up!)

Have The Sudden Impulse To Leave

, , , , , | Working | September 23, 2017

During my time at university, I was desperately trying to find work so I wouldn’t just be relying on student finance, which helps a lot, but just isn’t always enough as a my sole source of money.

It was in December, during Christmas break, and my money had all but dried up, I had very little left until my next loan was due to come in. I applied for a sales position that focused on credit cards, Netflix subscriptions, etc., and was told to come for an interview at their offices.

When I got there, however, we spent maybe five minutes in the office before we were moved out and told we had to get on a bus. Desperate for the possible job, I reluctantly took my last £10, which was meant to be for food shopping, out of the bank and paid for a ticket. They had us do some math questions to test our competency, which I, again, thought was weird to do on the bus.

Once we got to our destination, the interviewers took us to a cafe, sat us down at tables and talked to each of us individually, eventually giving us sheets to fill out while they left for the shopping centre around the corner, where they were doing their selling.

As I was filling out my form, one of the cafe workers came up to me and said I couldn’t sit there because I hadn’t ordered anything. I wasn’t about to spend the last of my money on just a drink or a sandwich or whatever, when it was for my food shopping, so I went to sit with one of the other people being interviewed who had ordered something.

When the sales workers came back, I was told I wasn’t allowed to sit with the others anymore, because the interview was us all competing, so we couldn’t talk to each other. Even after I explained the fact I wasn’t allowed to sit by myself without ordering anything, I was just told to figure it out.

They left again, for their oh-so-precious sales, leaving me in the dust with the cafe workers angrily glaring at me.

At this point, I was completely embarrassed and upset.

When the sales workers come back once again, the guy interviewing me said something that  was my final straw: “Now, when we’re out selling, what we’re looking for is impulsive people…”

In my mind, I instantly figured that to mean, “We’re looking to take advantage of people who have little self-control over what they buy.”

That’s when I told him that I couldn’t do it anymore and left. Even though it was an ordeal, and I was one of the two people left (it was sort of knock-out elimination; at each stage someone was asked to leave and not continue with the interviews), I just couldn’t go through with having a sales job that hounded on people like that.

His Work Ethic Is Not Broken

, , , , , | Working | August 31, 2017

(We have someone coming in for a job interview, which I’m preparing for. I get a call from one of the employees, who is freaking out and telling me to come down right away. When I get there, I see our interviewee leaning against the counter, covered in blood and with a clearly broken arm.)

Me: “Oh my gosh, sir! Are you okay? I’ll call you an ambulance right away!” *I notice that one of my employees is already on the phone with 911.*

Interviewee: *clearly in pain* “Oh, it’s okay, I’ll go to the hospital after the interview.”

Me: “What happened?”

Interviewee: “I tried to pull my cat from a tree branch outside and fell out of a second story window onto cement. Don’t worry about it. So, the interview?”

Me: “Sir, I know you want this job, but if you had called us and told us what had happened, I would have understood completely why you couldn’t make it in today and rescheduled!”

Interviewee: “Hey, while we’re waiting for the ambulance, do you think we can maybe quickly have that interview? I get the feeling I’ll be preoccupied the next couple of weeks.”

Me: “Uh… okay, sir.”

(Since the idea of the interview seemed to keep him calm, I agreed and gave him one on the spot while we waited, which he aced despite the fact that he was clearly in a lot of pain. When I told my boss what had happened, he told me to hire him, saying anyone who insisted on coming in despite a broken arm was clearly dedicated to getting that job. He’s been one of our best and most dedicated employees, to the point where we actually have to beg him not to come into work whenever he gets sick, because he refuses to call off.)

Couldn’t Handle The Reality Of Reality

, , , | Working | August 28, 2017

(I’ve interviewed a series of candidates for a position. One young guy comes in with no real experience, but he is really keen, and he mentions that he is just looking for a chance to prove himself and that he is really excited to have a “real” job apart from part time. He interviews well and we agree to give him a chance on a junior role. He gets his offer letter and we wait to hear from him about confirming his start date. He doesn’t respond after a day or two so I give him a call.)

Me: “This is [My Name]. We were hoping you would be able to confirm your start date. Did you get the letter?”

Candidate: “Sorry, I did, but my boss wasn’t in today, so I couldn’t sort it out.”

Me: “Okay, well, please let me know tomorrow where we stand.”

Candidate: “I will, thank you.”

(The next day comes and goes, and I have to ring him again.)

Me: “This is [My Name]. We haven’t heard from you today. We need to set up your computer and induction. What is happening?”

Candidate: “I’m sorry. I wanted to leave on [date we asked him to], but I didn’t put my notice in writing. I’m speaking to my boss tomorrow to sort it all out.”

Me: “Okay, we need to make a move here. We have plans in place and are keen to get you started. You were originally supposed to start [next week]. We need to know where we stand as this is urgent for us.”

Candidate: “Okay. I promise I will ring you tomorrow.”

(When he doesn’t ring the next day, I’m too busy in a meeting to get back to him. Instead, the day after, I call and get no response. I call the agency who sent his CV in and they can’t get hold of him. After a week of nothing [and a need to get someone employed urgently], we withdraw our offer in writing. A full week passes before he calls and gets my voicemail.)

Candidate: “What’s going on? I just got this letter. I told you I was sorting it out. It was only going to be a few more weeks. You’re just like [Other Company]. You suck.”

(Something told me he wasn’t ready for a “real job” yet.)

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