Unsure How To Insure, Part 5

| TX, USA | Working | October 21, 2014

(We left our insurance company for one month and are now going back to them with a slightly different policy. The insurance company needs proof of prior coverage from our previous insurer, which is them. But they can’t just get this from their records.)

Me: “Let me see if I have this straight. You want me to call my previous insurer – which is you – and request that you fax me proof of my prior coverage… with you. I will then send that proof of prior coverage back to you to prove to you that we did in fact have coverage with you, 30 days ago.”

Insurance Agent: “Yes, if you wouldn’t mind.”

Me: “Mind? It’s awesome. I’ll be telling this story for years!”

Related:
Unsure How To Insure, Part 4
Unsure How To Insure, Part 3
Unsure How To Insure, Part 2

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Unsure How To Insure, Part 4

| USA | Working | September 2, 2014

(I was in a car accident and had to fill out paperwork for the auto insurance company to reimburse the days of work I missed as a result of my injuries. They sent me a check and told me not to cash it until I got verification that they had received my paperwork, to avoid fraud. After about a month I was getting antsy, so I decided to call them.)

Insurance Agent: “This is [Company]. How can I help you?”

Me: “Hi. About a month ago I mailed some paperwork in regarding my reimbursement for my work days. I was told not to cash my check until I received something in the mail saying you received it. I was just hoping someone could check if my mail arriv—”

Insurance Agent: “It hasn’t.”

Me: “Oh… Uhm, you didn’t ask for my name or information.”

Insurance Agent: “We haven’t received that sort of mail at this time. You need to mail it.”

Me: “Well… I did. I did mail it. If it’s an issue with the post office then that’s all I need to know.”

Insurance Agent: “We can mail you another copy of that paperwork if need be.”

Me: “Sure, that’d be great.”

(I received yet another copy in the mail, and mailed it with two-day delivery. Two months later, I still have not heard from an agent. I figure that the chances of the letter getting lost again are low, so I cash the check and hope for the best. A few days later I receive a call.)

Insurance Agent: “Ma’am, it appears that it took you about four months to cash in your check. Why did you wait so long?”

Me: “I was told not to touch it until I received verification, via mail, that you got my paperwork. The first letter was apparently lost somewhere, and I mailed my second copy two months ago, which should have been in your hands one month and 27 days ago.”

Insurance Agent: “We have never had that rule for checks. We believe there is reason that you did not need that money after all.”

Me: “Excuse me? When I talked to an agent on the phone, she told me not to touch it, and said it in the mail she herself sent me. The only reason I cashed the check is because I figured there’s no way the same kind of letter could get lost twice.”

Insurance Agent: “An agent would not have told you that. But it shocks me that if that was a rule of ours, you cashed your check anyway.”

Me: “Seriously? Could you tell me if you received my mail or not?”

(The insurance agent takes my information. He insists that not only was my letter not delivered, but I must not have mailed it at all!)

Me: “I mailed it. There’s no way the post office is this neglectful and so strategically coincidental to lose the same two pieces of mail a month apart. You have to have it.”

Insurance Agent: “Ma’am, I’m disconnecting the call as you are threatening me.”

Me: “WHAT?!”

(The following week, an agent called me. He also insisted that my mail had not arrived, but stated that this wasn’t my fault, and this wasn’t the first call he’s gotten this month regarding lost mail! He apologized for the behavior of the caller, told me not to worry about implications of fraud, and said that I can keep my check. The mystery was never solved!)

Related:
Unsure How To Insure, Part 3
Unsure How To Insure, Part 2
From NotAlwaysRight.com
Unsure How To Insure

At The End Of Your Dog Days

| Des Moines, IA USA | Related | July 25, 2014

(A sweet 86-year-old lady comes into my insurance office.)

Me: “Hi, how can I help you?”

Lady: “I wanted to change the beneficiaries of my life insurance policy.”

(She submits the form and has several children, listing each one individually and what percentage of her policy each should receive when she dies. She gets to the last person:)

Lady: “And to Arthur, 0%, because he loves his dog more than his own mother.”

Being Careful With Words Is Now A Mute Point

, | Tarpon Springs, FL, USA | Right | July 8, 2014

(I front the calls for an insurance call center. I’m on the phone with a customer, chit-chatting a little about the weather difference, since he is from California. I put my mic on mute while I try to see which agents are free to transfer the call to. In the meantime, I hear the customer talking to his friend in the background.)

Friend: “What’s that about?”

Customer: “Something about life insurance. But you should hear her. She sounds hot! I wish I had it on speaker. She sounded really hot! Like seriously, you should hear her! Too bad we’re on opposite ends of the country. She’s in Florida. I guess she just moved from Minnesota.”

(The entire time I can feel myself turning red, and debate on letting him know I can hear him, but I decide it’s time.)

Me: “Actually, from Michigan! But close!”

Customer: “Oh, from Michigan!”

(At this point you can hear the realization in his voice.)

Customer: “Oh, crap! You can hear everything? Oh, jeez! You should warn people! Like ‘I’m going to put you on hold but I can still hear you’!”

Me: “Yeah, but that would take out all the fun!”

Customer: “Oh man, this is so embarrassing! Well, at least you know somebody thinks you sound hot!”

(I could hear both him and his friend crack up. It made my day!)

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Should Have A Brain Scan

| CA, USA | Working | June 26, 2014

(This takes place in the early ‘90s. Our office has changed computer systems and has new terminals. On the front of the terminal is a green power light.)

Coworker #1: “What’s the light for?”

Coworker #2: “It is a retinal security system. You have to put your eye to it each time you login: morning, lunch, or break.”

(A week later.)

Supervisor: “[Coworker #1], what the f*** are you doing with your eye to the terminal?!”

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