Weekend Roundup: Tech Support Classics, Part 2

, , | Not Always Right | Roundups, Technology

Tech Support Classics, Part 2: This week, we feature another five stories that reveal the trials, tribulations, and terrors that technical support employees endure daily! PS–also check out Tech Support Classics, Part 1!

  1. Scareware Makes Us Aware:
    TMI: getting an STD from an FLV!
  2. Workin’ That Tech Support Magic:
    A clever tech support employee gets some magical help!
  3. Get A Life:
    A “real”-ly demanding customer gets a “reality” check.
  4. What She Needs Is A Skynet:
    Artificial intelligence meets zero intelligence.
  5. How To Make Them As Silent As A Mouse, Part 2:
    A user points and clicks their way into the Tech Support Hall Of Shame!

PS #1: check out our new Extras section, with pictures, videos, and news galore!

PS #2: Read more roundups here!

Weekend Roundup: When Customers Attack!

, , , , | Not Always Right | Roundups, Wild & Unruly

When Customers Attack! This week, we share stories of unruly customers who prefer (violent) action over words!

  1. Bull In A China Shop:
    Sticks & stones may break my bones, but naked, guitar-throwing customers can really hurt me!
  2. Acute Mental Failure:
    HULK CAN’T FIGURE OUT HOSPITAL DOOR! HULK SMASH!
  3. (Full) Front(al) Desk:
    Can’t check into your hotel room, lady? Just mentally check out by ripping off your clothes and running in circles!
  4. Fudge In Flight:
    A customer airs their fudge frustrations by sending their ice cream sundae airborne.
  5. Marriage: The Ultimate Slippery Slope:
    Here’s to throwing your belongings in the air like you just don’t care!

PS #1: check out our new Extras section, with pictures, videos, and news galore!

PS #2: Read more roundups here!

A Quack Of All Trades

| Springfield, MA, USA | Health & Body

(I work at the information desk in a section of the hospital allocated for renting to private practices. It’s a pretty large building, so we get a lot of patients asking directions to a certain doctor’s office.)

Patient: “I have an appointment at 2:00. Where do I go?”

Me: “Well, this is a large building with a lot of doctors in it. Who did you need to see?”

Patient: “I don’t know. Can’t you look it up? My name is [name].”

Me: “Unfortunately, I don’t have access to the doctors’ schedules. Do you remember what kind of doctor it was? General practitioner, cardiologist—”

Patient: “I don’t remember.”

Me: “What were you seeing the doctor for?”

Patient: “My kidneys, I think…”

(I start going through the list of doctors looking for nephrologists.)

Me: “Does [nephrologist] sound familiar?”

Patient: “I don’t remember! Just tell me where my appointment is!”