How To Deflate The Bag

| IL, USA | Bad Behavior, Food & Drink, Top

(I work in the produce section of a grocery store. I have just witnessed a customer pretty much destroy our bagged-salad section. The customer is just pulling bags out of their holders and dropping them where ever, and quite obviously on purpose. The customer has no idea I’ve been watching her. After she stops her destruction, I head over to put it back together. The customer comes back, and starts a conversation.)

Customer: “It’s just a shame that someone would do that to you! I can’t believe some people!”

Me: “Bah, it’s not really a big deal.”

Customer: “…not really a big deal?”

Me: “No, not at all. I look at it this way: If a customer has to get their kicks by coming into this grocery store and trying to get a rise out of the employees by messing up a portion of the store, then that customer’s life is obviously more pathetic than mine.”

Customer: *open mouthed stare*

Me: “So, was there anything else you needed tonight?”

Customer: “No… thanks…”

Scamming In Full Bloom

| Bolton, England, UK | Liars & Scammers

(I am a supervisor working a 10-hour shift on the hottest day of the year. As it is the evening shift, there are only two of us on. I have sent my colleague on her break so I am at the till.)

Customer: “Can I speak to the manager please?”

Me: “Both the Store Manager and Team Manager aren’t here, but I am the supervisor if you have any problems.”

Customer: “Well I bought some flowers yesterday. They were for a friend who has cancer. When I got home I noticed they were in terrible condition. Probably caused by the heat.”

Me: “Do you have a receipt?”

Customer: “No.”

Me: “Okay, do you have the flowers with you?”

Customer: “No. I threw them out.”

Me: “Well, I’m sorry; I can’t do anything without either of those two things. How much did they cost?”

Customer: “£10.”

(I find this odd, because we only sell £10 flowers during occasions like Mother’s Day or Christmas.)

Me: “Well, there is nothing I can do without the proof of purchase and the product itself. I need to be able to scan the product to refund it. I can’t just give you £10 out of my till.”

Customer: *patronizing tone* “Look, sweetie, you don’t really know how retail works. If a product is bad, you get a refund. You probably became a supervisor by sucking your way up the food chain. Now give me my money, or I’ll call head office on you!”

Me: “Please don’t say things like that. And by all means, call them! They will tell you exactly the same thing I’m telling you. They’ll also tell you that the flowers in question haven’t been sold at this store for nearly two months.”

Customer: “Listen here, you little piece of—”

(My coworker returns from break.)

Coworker: “What’s going on here?”

Me: “I was just about to give this gentleman this phone so he can ring head office, and tell them what a terrible cashier and supervisor I am. Also, out of curiosity, what time did you buy these supposed flowers yesterday?”

Customer: “I bought them yesterday afternoon!”

Me: “[Coworker], did you sell flowers that we don’t even stock that cost £10 to this man yesterday?”

Coworker: “Nope!”

Me: “Neither did I. And since we are the only two people on after midday, I think I’ll call the police.”

(I had no intention of calling the police, but the customer bolted out all the same. Instead, I called all the company stores in the area and told them to watch out for him. It turned out he had already caught out a young impressionable Saturday worker. Eventually, I heard the police caught up with him!)

No Produce Reduce

| TX, USA | At The Checkout, Food & Drink, Money

(The customer in question is our grocery store’s former produce manager. She was encouraged to ‘retire’, because she was caught raising the prices of the produce so her sales would be better. She has a return and a few items, so I do her return and scan her items to balance out the difference in which she only owes me one cent.)

Me: “Okay, your total is one cent.”

Customer: “That’s not right. The onions are ringing up wrong.”

(I look at my screen, and the onions she bought were ringing up 68 cents a pound.)

Me: “They’re only 68 cents.”

Customer: “They are supposed to be 99 cents a pound! That’s what the sign says.”

Me: “Those are for large onions. You bought medium ones.”

Customer: “Well… I guess I’ll take them for that price, but your new produce manager needs to learn how to price things right.”

(She storms out in a huff, and my manager walks over.)

Manager: “Did she just… want to pay the higher price?”

Me: “Yes… and while you’re here, I’m reaching into my pocket to get the penny that she forgot to pay me for her stuff.”