Your Attempts At A Refund Are Not Silky Smooth

, , , , , | Right | November 7, 2017

Customer: “Do you clean coats?”

Me: “Yes, we do.”

Customer: “How much is it?”

Me: “It depends, miss. Some coats are longer, and the fabric is thicker; those will need more dry-cleaning chemical to soak in and more time to dry, and will therefore cost more.”

Customer: “Okay, so, how much for a long coat?”

Me: “You’ll have to show me the item, because I can’t estimate the cost until I’ve seen it. I’m sorry.”

Customer: “Here’s my stuff.”

Me: “These coats are wool and are as long as a person. They will be $18.95 each. That blouse is white silk, but the problem is that there are yellow stains on it and we cannot guarantee it will be cleaned fully or even at all, due to the apparent age of the stain. Would you like to clean it still?”

Customer: “Yeah, just try it.”

Me: “Okay.” *processes the ticket order for the customer*

Customer: “I also want to pay for it now.”

Me: “Okay. The total for two coats and that blouse is $39.85.”

(The customer pays and leaves. One week later:)

Customer: “Okay, I’m here to pick up my stuff.”

Me: “I remember your name. Here it is.”

(The customer picks up and leaves. Two hours later:)

Customer: *brings in blouse* “Uh, this isn’t cleaned.”

Me: “I did mention to you that we would try, but we couldn’t promise or guarantee you that it would be cleaned fully. It spread out, but it’s not noticeable to the naked eye unless people look at it carefully. You said you still want to dry-clean it despite my protests.”

Customer: “I understand, but I believe that it is in good business practice to give me back a portion of the money I paid, since it wasn’t cleaned properly.”

Me: “We could not complete the cleaning; our chemicals would’ve been too harsh if we kept trying to get the stains out and would have disintegrated the silk fabric, and then it would have been ruined for good. We will not refund you all of your money for that item, but some, okay?”

Customer: “Okay.”

Me: “Here is your money.”

(I refund $3.50 out of $6.95 for cleaning said blouse.)

Customer: *looks down in shock* “When I said, ‘portion,’ I meant this amount.” *points at $18.95*

Me: “That was for the coat, not the blouse. Since that was cleaned properly and stains from that coat were gone, we will not refund you for that.”

Customer: “I still believe it is good business practice that you refund me a portion of the payment.”

Me: “You mean half of the bill, right?”

Customer: “Well…”

Me: “We will not, and it’s up to you to choose whether accept the $3.50 or not.”

Customer: “Fine. I’ll just never come back here again, then.”

(I said nothing more, and the customer left when they realized they weren’t getting anything else.)

Unfiltered Story #98694

, , , | Unfiltered | October 24, 2017

(When you bring clothes to a dry cleaner, the order is assigned a number. All clothes are tagged with that number so they can be reassembled, and the number is written on a tag pinned to the bag. A man comes in to pick up his suit, I enter the tag number, and tell him the total.)

Me: “Okay, so that is forty-four ninety-OOOHH NO IT’S NOT it’s sixteen sixty-two!”

Customer: *Eyes bug out at first, then laughs when I correct myself* “I was gonna say, that’s way too much for a suit!”

(I had accidentally started reading the claim cheque number instead of the actual price. Luckily that was the only time I made that mistake, and the customer in question thought it was rather funny.)

Reiterate The Eight

| Oslo, Norway | Right | January 28, 2015

(I work part-time at a dry cleaning place that closes at 8 pm on weekdays. I always close at exactly 8 pm, and finish up as fast as I can to catch the bus home. This particular night, I am running a few minutes late, and don’t get to start closing the register until 8:05. A customer comes with her arms full of clothing at 8:10.)

Customer: “Hi! I want to hand in some clothes for cleaning!”

Me: “I’m so sorry, but I’m already closed. I can’t take in any more clothes today. You’re going to have to come by tomorrow.”

Customer: *seeming perfectly calm* “Oh… that’s all right! I’ll do that then!”

(The next day, the customer comes back. This time, the manager, who works the daytime shift, is still there.)

Me: “Hi! How may I help you?”

Customer: *very angrily, to the manager* “I came here last night, and this girl told me I was too late and that I couldn’t hand in my clothes!”

Manager: “Oh? [My Name], did you close early last night?”

Me: “No. Actually, I closed later than I usually do.”

Customer: “Well, I was only here three minutes past eight! I don’t understand why you couldn’t take in my clothes!”

Me: “Actually, you were here ten minutes past eight. I was looking at the giant clock that’s hanging right behind you. But I’d be happy to register your clothes in now.”

(I finish the transaction, with the customer still looking generally unhappy.)

Manager: *to the customer as she’s leaving* “And by the way! We close at exactly eight. Three minutes past is still after closing time!”

Customer: “Well, that is just horrible customer service!”

Manager: *to me, after the customer has left* “How is it bad customer service? Technically, that’s no customer service.”

1 Thumbs
1,404
VOTES

They Handle Suits For A Living

| Brooklyn, NY, USA | Right | July 2, 2013

Customer: “I’m here to pick up my jacket. The ticket number is [number].”

Me: “Let me check…”

(Upon checking the ticket, I realize that the jacket has been left two years ago. This most likely means that it’s since been donated to charity, or auctioned off. According to the state law, after being unclaimed for six months, clothing can be donated to charity or sold off to recoup the losses.)

Me: “I’m going to go check if we have it in the back. I’ll be back in a minute.”

(Sure enough, it doesn’t exist.)

Me: “It looks like we don’t have your jacket anymore, since it was left here two years ago and has never been claimed.”

Customer: “What do you mean it’s not here anymore?”

Me: “Since your jacket had been left here two years ago, it was probably donated or auctioned off by the previous owner.”

Customer: “No, that can’t be. Go back there check again.”

(I go into the back again, but come out empty handed.)

Me: “Nope. We don’t have it anymore. Sorry.”

Customer: “I can’t believe this! You guys can’t just get rid of my clothes like that! It’s an expensive jacket! Do you know how much that jacket cost me?”

Me: “Actually, yes, we can, according to the law, cited in section 399-BB. Any clothes left unclaimed for more than six months can be donated to charity or sold off.”

Customer: “Nuh-uh! You find my jacket, or I’ll call the police!”

Me: “I said it before and I’ll say it again: your jacket is not here anymore. I’d love to find your jacket so we can resolve this issue, but I can’t.”

Customer: “It cost me $800!”

Me: “I wish I could help you, but I can’t since it’s been disposed of by the previous owner.”

Customer: “I’ll sue you! I’m going to the small claims court and suing your a**!”

Me: “So, let me put it into perspective: you leave your precious $800 jacket here, come back out of the blue after two years, and then threaten to sue us, even though the law in this case, which was created specifically for situations like this, states that we aren’t responsible for unclaimed clothes that have been left at the premises for more than six months? Not to mention the fact that we have absolutely no recollection of this, since our family took over the store just a couple of months ago?”

(Due to the inability to provide a rational response, the customer proceeds to flip out. Eventually, the police are involved after the customer made the phone call, and an officer is dispatched. I explain to the officer what has occurred, as well as the law regarding the matter, and he sides with us. The customer ends up leaving empty-handed.)

1 Thumbs
2,366
VOTES

When Press Comes To Shove

| Toronto, ON, Canada | Right | March 20, 2012

(I’m working at a dry cleaners. It’s nearly closing time, so my 6’5″, 250 lb. fiancé is waiting out of sight in the back for me to finish up. A last minute customer arrives.)

Customer: *angrily* “Are my shirts done yet?!”

Me: “Yes, sir. Let me get those for you.”

(I get the shirts, which the customer has waited a long time to pick up—several weeks. They are therefore not perfectly pressed anymore. The customer inspects them and is clearly not happy.)

Customer: “This is terrible work! Look at this wrinkle!”

Me: “I’m sorry sir, but they were—”

(The customer shoves himself aggressively over the counter and starts yelling abusively in my face.)

Customer: “WHAT KIND OF CRAPPY DRY CLEANER ARE YOU ANYWAY!?”

(Suddenly, my fiancé, who has heard all this, whips out from the back of the store and jumps in front of the counter, between me and the abusive customer. He moves to within three inches of the customer’s face, and looks down at him menacingly.)

Fiancé: *softly, but in deep bass register* “DO. YOU. HAVE. A. PROBLEM?”

Customer: *cowers back* “No, no…everything’s fine…”

(The customer grabs his shirts and literally flees out the store.  I never saw him again.)

Me: *to fiance* “I love you.”

1 Thumbs
3,200
VOTES