Cash Back Attack, Part 7

, , , | Right | September 1, 2018

(I do conventions, selling my arts and crafts. I am taking a girl’s credit card via my PayPal swiper on my phone.)

Customer: “Can I get cash back for this?”

Me: “Uh… Madam… It doesn’t work that way… I don’t have a register.”

Customer: “Oh, right, sorry.”

Related:
Cash Back Attack, Part 6
Cash Back Attack, Part 5
Cash Back Attack, Part 4

Attack Of The Mansplainer

, , , , , | Right | August 12, 2018

(For several years, my dad and I have been running a booth at a local annual comic book convention where we sell pieces of our comic book collections and some comic book-related artwork. My dad and I are both collectors; he’s been collecting for 60+ years and raised me on comics. This year, my dad is unable to help man the booth due to a work conflict, so I’m working the table on my own. During a lull in business, an older gentleman approaches the booth and begins looking through a box of $1 comics.)

Me: “Hi there! Is there anything in particular you’re looking for?”

Customer: *glancing at me briefly with a sigh* “Are these yours?”

Me: “Yup.”

(He suddenly snatches a comic book from the box and shoves it toward me.)

Customer: “This is priced incorrectly.”

Me: *thinking that he means it’s overpriced* “Oh, the comics in that box are actually only $1.”

Customer: “That’s not what I mean! It’s way under-priced. This comic is worth much more than $1.”

Me: “Well, I know it’s worth a little more, but we’ve got multiple copies of that issue, and we’ve had some trouble selling it, so we marked it down. Think of it like a clearance item. It’s a pretty good bargain.”

Customer: “You really need to charge more for it. Trust me; I know comics. It’s worth more.”

(I glance at the comic and recognize the title. I’m certain that the issue is really only worth about $5, but don’t want to embarrass him by correcting him.)

Me: “We’re really just trying to unload it. It’s hard to sell that issue for more than $1.”

Customer: “Where’s the owner of this booth? I think I should talk to him about how you’re pricing his comics.”

Me: “I’m the owner of this booth, sir.”

Customer: “These aren’t your comics.”

Me: “Actually, they are.”

Customer: “Who paid for the booth? Whose comics are these? That’s the guy I want to talk to. You obviously aren’t familiar with comic books if you think that this is worth only $1. You’re really screwing over the guy who owns it.”

Me: “I paid for the booth, and the comics in that box belong to me. I’m very familiar with comics, which is why I’m working here… at a comic book booth, at a comic book convention.”

Customer: “Then you’d know that this comic isn’t worth $1.”

Me: “That issue is worth only about $5. But if you really want to pay more for it, I can charge you more. What do you think it’s worth?”

Customer: “I don’t want to buy it; I just think you need to do more research before you try to come out here and pretend that you know anything about comic books. You’ll just end up embarrassing yourself. You know, not everyone is as polite as I am, sweetie.”

Me: *obviously insulted, but really just wanting him to leave at this point* “Noted. Is there anything else you want to buy?”

Customer: “Well, let me finish looking!”

(I shut my mouth and sat quietly as he finished rifling through the box. He finished, finding nothing else he wanted, and then walked away without a word. About thirty minutes later, I spotted him at a booth a few yards away, giving grief to another young vendor and lecturing her about how much he knew about comic books and how “annoying” it was to have to deal with so many “fake” female comic book vendors who under-priced their comics. I had never seen anyone so angry about being asked to pay LESS for a product!)

Free To Complain

, , | Right | July 13, 2018

(I’m working with a company that sells foods. We are at a convention, and every other company is setting up their booth, trying to get people interested in their product. As the day goes by, most people are polite in saying, “No,” except for this one guy.)

Me: “Hi, would you like to sign up to get free food?”

Guy: *angry face* “Why?!”

Me: “Because… it’s free food? Free food?”

Guy: “Would you do it?!”

Me: “Yeah? It’s free?”

Guy: “You’re a d*** fool, then!” *swaggers off*

Me: “…”

Coworker: “Wow. I’ve never seen someone turn down something free! A**hole.”

(I guess it happens. But he didn’t have to get an attitude about it. Maybe he thought we were going to seek his info, but we wouldn’t.)

Unconventional At A Convention

, , , , , , | Hopeless | May 11, 2018

My friends and I are walking through the dealer’s room at a convention when one friend spies a booth selling blind boxes of character figures from his favorite video game. Blind boxes have a set of figures they could contain, but the buyer doesn’t know exactly which one they get when they purchase it. My friend is super excited, since the game is somewhat older and the blind box figures are no longer being made, making them semi-rare. He only has enough money to buy two boxes, and he opens them as soon as he gets them. By chance, both blind boxes contain the same character figurine.

Before we can walk away, the owner of the booth stops us. He holds out an unopened blind box and offers to exchange one of my friend’s figures for it, giving him the chance to get something different. My friend takes him up on the offer, and the rest of us are so impressed by the owner’s actions that each of us finds something to buy from his booth.  

It’s a convention tradition now to seek out that booth and buy something from it. Everybody won that day: my friend got a figurines of his two favorite characters, we found a great place to get our convention snacks, and the family that owns the booth gained a group of loyal customers!

A Selfless Selfie Act

, , , , | Hopeless | April 12, 2018

My family and I went to a comic convention where my daughter was able to meet a pretty well-known male voice actor. My daughter is autistic, and due to the disability, we were able to get special bracelets and jump part of the line to see this particular celebrity. This was a nice accommodation, and I was pretty happy that my daughter wouldn’t have to wait in a long line; she doesn’t do well waiting.

We got called up to see said celebrity, and my daughter was gushing, asking really simple, easy-to-answer questions, over and over again. I mentioned that she was autistic, so this was how she talked and interacted with people.

The celebrity, upon learning my daughter was autistic, looked at his handler and said, “Don’t charge them. The autograph and selfie ($60) are free.”

I almost started to cry. I was absolutely willing to shell out the money to make my daughter happy. This man was absolutely amazing and took at least five minutes to devote time to her and did all the voices she requested. If he’s at another comic convention we can attend, we’re definitely going to see him again, if only to just say, “Hello.”

Page 1/1312345...Last