Disabled But Not Disarmed

| UK | Bigotry, Crazy Requests, Food & Drink, Top

(An early morning regular customer is a disabled woman in her 30s who dresses very gothic and always orders a coffee and then reads a book. A new customer I’ve never seen before comes to the serving counter.)

Customer: “I have a complaint!”

Me: “I’m very sorry to hear that. What have we done wrong?”

Customer: “You let that [disabled slur] not only sit here but she takes up two seats!”

Me: “Please don’t use words like that. She’s a very good and quiet customer who uses the second chair to prop her walking stick against. Besides, this early in the morning there are plenty of seats.”

Customer: “She’s offending us! She’s being abusive!”

(I’m confused, because I’ve not seen the lady even move from her chair.)

Me: “Er, what has she said?”

Customer: “Nothing! She didn’t even apologise!”

Me: “What on earth for?”

Customer: “For reading one of those e-book things, and being lazy, and fat, and—”

(I can see our regular struggling to her feet and limping over.)

Me: “Please just stop. She’s not affecting you.”

Customer: “She’s a lazy f****** bum. I bet she’s on f****** benefits!”

(Our regular makes it to the counter.)

Regular Customer:  “Could I please have another coffee as I’ve finished the first one and haven’t finished the chapter I’m reading.”

(She hands me a £10 note.)

Regular Customer: “Please keep the change as a tip.” *turns to the complaining customer* “Darlin’, I work as a software engineer and you need to work on your d*** manners. Us disabled have a right to get coffee as well.”

(The new customer stomped back to her table and sat there eating her breakfast and glowering at our regular, who paid no attention at all to it. We found she’d left another £5 behind as an additional tip for ‘dealing with that.’)

Doesn’t Get The French Connection

| BC, Canada | Bigotry, Language & Words

(This takes place in western Canada. French and English are both official languages in Canada, but sometimes people forget that, apparently. My coworker is from Montreal and has a strong French accent, though his English is excellent. A customer decides to give him trouble because he doesn’t speak English as a first language.)

Customer: “What the f***? You f***ers need to learn English before you come here! We only speak English in Canada!”

Coworker: “Sir, I was born in Canada. I’m from Montreal. French is my first language, but I assure you I’m fluent in English.”

Me: “Sir, I’m bilingual, too, because French is one of Canada’s official languages. If you’re going to be in Canada, why on Earth don’t you learn French?”

(He grabbed his coffee and stomped off.)

A Healing Cup Of Coffee

| SC, USA | Awesome Workers, Family & Kids, Food & Drink, Top

(It’s the week before finals, and my sister and I are both feeling the stress. We end up driving out to the nearest coffee chain with an armload of homework. I’ve only been there twice, but my sister frequently refers to it as probably the nicest branch of this coffee chain ever, by which she always means the people there. We order our drinks and sit down on a little couch in the corner. We end up waiting for a really long time, and people who have ordered after us are getting their drinks before us. My sister looks up from her computer.)

Sister: “This is very unusual for them.”

(About 20 minutes later, the woman who took our orders hurries over with our drinks and gift cards, apologizing profusely. Evidently, the ticket had gotten lost or something like that.)

Cashier: “I am so sorry about this! Just take these to any [Coffee Chain], and you’ll get a drink for free.”

Me: “Oh, it’s all right; we weren’t waiting THAT long!”

(My sister and I try to reassure her that we’re not upset. She starts to walk away, then stops. She looks at my sister and I quizzically.)

Cashier: “Sorry, but… are you two twins?”

Sister: “Yes, we are!”

Cashier: “My husband is a twin. Was a twin. His sister died really recently and…” *she stops for a moment to compose herself* “And yesterday was the first time he’s had to celebrate his birthday without her.”

(My sister and I both express our sympathy and condolences, and she kind of laughs.)

Cashier: “I don’t even know why I’m telling you this.”

Me: “Maybe that’s why the drinks were delayed; because you needed someone to talk to.”

(Maybe it was an odd statement, but I really felt that if the drinks were on time, she wouldn’t have been able to talk to us about being a twin and losing a twin. Ma’am, I hope you and your husband are doing better now, wherever you are. Thank you for the gift cards!)