Weekly Roundup: Lost & Confused

, , , , | Not Always Right | Geography, Roundups

Lost & Confused: This week, we feature five stories of customers who are “geographically disadvantaged!”

  1. For The Love Of God, Get GPS:
    An employee serves as a human GPS for one completely lost customer!
  2. More Cars Than Common Sense:
    A couple thinks they lost their car, when they’ve really lost their minds.
  3. For The Love Of God, Get GPS, Part 2:
    This confused hotel guest puts the “duh” in Cana-duh!
  4. At The Corner Of Me & Myself:
    We need more than your living room to locate you, sir.
  5. The Great State Of Confusion, Part 4:
    An airline passenger ends up in New Orleans, LA–Los Angeles, that is!

PS #1: check out our new Extras section, with pictures, videos, and news galore!

PS #2: Read more roundups here!

Take Your Time, And Ours Too

| Ohio, USA | Food & Drink, Technology, Time

(Note: I have been trying to help a caller get logged into our website for 20 minutes, but she keeps mistyping her username.)

Me: “Alright, let’s try this again. Remember that your username is ******. So, try it again and I’ll wait for you to type.”

Caller: “Okay, I’ll try it again. Just give me a minute to type.”

(For a few minutes, there is silence. Then, I hear her get up, walk away from the phone, and begin to punch what sounds like microwave buttons. Soon afterwards, I hear popcorn popping.)

Me: *confused* “Are you still trying to enter your username?”

Caller: “Oh! Are we still trying to get me logged in? I thought we were just chatting now, and I thought I would make myself a snack!”

Indiscriminate Discrimi-Nation

| Chicago, USA | Bigotry

(I work in a call center as a supervisor. I overhear this conversation.)

Representative: “Thank you for holding. This is [Pakistani name]. How may I help you?”

Customer: “I’m sorry, what is your name?”

Representative: “[Pakistani name], sir.”

Customer: “Where are you located?”

Representative: “In Chicago, sir.”

Customer: “Are you sure you’re not in India? You sound like you’re Indian.”

(Note: the rep was born and raised in Chicago and is the son of an English father and Pakistani mother. He has no accent whatsoever.)

Representative: “Sir, I am certain we are in Chicago.”

Customer: “I want to talk to an American! I don’t want to talk to someone in India.”

Representative: “Sir, I was born and raised in the US. My parents are English and Pakistani, not Indian.”

Customer: “I want to talk to someone in America!”

Representative: “Sir, again I can assure you: you are talking to an American in America.”

Customer: “I WANT TO TALK TO AN AMERICAN!”

Representative: “Sir, I am an American.”

Customer: “I know you people are in India! I’m complaining to my company that they outsourced us to you!” *hangs up*