A Failure In Expectation

, , , , , | Right | October 25, 2018

(I am working the busiest day of the back-to-school season. Our line has reached the back of the store and is wrapping along the back. Every register is open.)

Me: “Your total comes to—”

(Suddenly, the whole store goes black before I can finish. We have lost power, including the registers.)

Me: “Looks like we have lost power. Hopefully it will come back on soon. We are going to give it five minutes, but if it is still out after that, we are going to have to close; it’s a safety hazard.”

Customer: “Well, I am not leaving without those dividers; they are the last ones and I need them!”

Me: “Hopefully we can get the registers back soon so we can get them for you.”

(After a few minutes, the power comes back, but our registers are locked out and require additional boot-up time.)

Me: “We are booting this back up. It should just take a few minutes.”

Customer: “Can I just give you the money and get the item?”

(Store alarms are going off and computers are trying to turn on.)

Me: “Once I get the register to work again, then yes.”

Customer: “Why is this taking so long? The customers before us didn’t have to wait this long!”

(They are, of course, referring to customers that left before the power went out. I stand there trying to remain composed as the managers run around trying to appease the growing lines.)

Customer: “Can’t I just give you the money and go?”

Me: “I can’t open the cash drawer, and I don’t know the total for these items.”

Customer: “Why don’t you know the prices of what you sell?”

Me: “We carry over 70,000 items, and they go on different sales every week; I couldn’t possibly know the price for every one.”

Customer: “I just really need these dividers.”

(I don’t know why the dividers were that important, or what the customer expected me to do in a power failure.)

The Couponator 10: Expiration Day

, , , , , , | Right | October 25, 2018

(I am working the register at a popular office supply store. The store has frequent coupons and a rewards program for which customers receive information via email. It is common for customers to complain about not getting their rewards immediately, as they think it is a discount.)

Customer: “I want to use this coupon.”

(The customer holds up his phone displaying a coupon from the week prior.)

Me: “This coupon is expired, so I can’t apply it.”

Customer: “You guys always do this; you send out deals and I can never use them. You are trying to trick me.”

(The customer scrolls through emails and settles on one that is just an ad for an online sale we have, not even on the product he is buying.)

Customer: “Can I use this coupon?”

Me: “This isn’t a coupon; it’s just an ad for a chair.”

Customer: “See? This is all a scam! What about this one? This one says, ‘Last day.’ I wonder if I can use it?”

Me: “Again, sir, this coupon has expired.”

Customer: “Always! You people always send me coupons that are expired.”

(The customer scrolls past the email with a valid reward, and I point it out to him.)

Customer: “Finally you decide to do your job and stop scamming me.”

(Yes, because the store sends out expired coupons and is misleading you when they write, “Last day,” in the subject line. It isn’t our fault you tried to use the coupon three days after the last day email was sent.)

Related:
The Couponator 9: The Passive Aggression
The Couponator 8: The Fabric Of Reality
The Couponator 7: The Forgotten Coupon

Literally Showing Them The Door

, , , , , | Right | October 11, 2018

(I work in a popular office supply store, which also has a copy center. It is not unheard of for a customer to pay for copies at regular checkout. This takes place right after open. The store has one very obvious door for enter and exit.)

Customer: “How do I get out?”

(I think she means, “check out,” since we are about five feet from the door.)

Me: “Do you need to be checked out?”

Customer: “No! I already paid. How do I leave?”

Me: *gesturing at door* “You can just walk out.”

(I told my manager; she didn’t believe me.)