This One Is A No-Brainer

, , , | Right | August 22, 2018

(I’ve just graduated and have been accepted for a new job with my degree. I’m just completing the last few weeks of my job as a supervisor at a cinema complex. This customer has been screaming at me at the desk for me the last five minutes, over the fact that I will not let his thirteen-year-old into a rated R16 movie, and that we dared to ask for the kid’s ID.)

Me: “Sir, it’s a legal restriction. We cannot allow anyone under the age of 16 into this film, and to be certain we meet that obligation, we have to check anyone who looks under 25 for ID.”

Customer: “Well, he plays video games that are R18 and R16 all the time! I’m his father, and I say he’s allowed to!”

(I just want to yell at him that he’s breaking the law by doing that, anyway.)

Me: “It doesn’t work that way. We are legally obligated to check.”

(I provide him with paperwork from our online website stating our terms and conditions regarding this. It’s even highlighted… in bright yellow)

Me: “See? Here are our conditions—”

Customer: *not reading it* “I said I’m his father, and I allow him. What right do you have over that?”

Me: “The New Zealand law?”

Customer: *going on a rant I don’t really take notice of* “…by some stupid dropout at a cinema.”

(I remind him of the law and obligations, and agree to fetch the manager for him.)

Me: “…also, not a dropout. I’m a college graduate about to work with rehabilitation of traumatic brain injury. I’ll just go get my manager for you, sir!”

(For the record, my new clients with severe brain injuries have better sense than this guy did.)

Like Stealing A Baby From A Trolley

, , , , , , | Right | August 14, 2018

I was in the supermarket yesterday and saw something so crazy that if I hadn’t seen it with my own eyes, I would never have believed that someone would be that horrible!

I was waiting in line to pay for my shopping when I saw an older lady following an employee, berating him, as there were no shopping trolleys nearby. It was obviously his job was to collect them from the car park — it was raining really hard so I guess he was waiting a few minutes — and she was actually pulling on his uniform shirt to try and get his undivided attention.

She stopped shouting all of a sudden, turned around, and found a shopping trolley behind her. It was not quite empty — it had a newborn baby in a capsule in the main compartment of the trolley — but the mother’s back was turned. She took the baby out of the trolley, dumped the capsule in the middle of the aisle, and then took the shopping trolley off with her.

I was standing there gobsmacked, but so stunned it took a minute to realise what had actually happened. The mother had turned around to get something and was talking with another employee. She turned back and just about freaked out when she couldn’t place her hand on her trolley! By this time, there were now three employees chasing the older woman down the aisle — including a huge security officer — and she was screaming, “No! It’s mine! I found it!”

The mother calmed down a bit, picked her baby up out of the capsule, and stood there like a deer in the headlights. Honestly… Was it that important to have a trolley that she had to oust a tiny baby out of it?

The kicker was that after being escorted out of the store by the security officer, the lady was carrying only a loaf of bread. Did she really need a trolley for a loaf of bread?! The hardest thing I found to comprehend was that another woman had taken out the baby with no thought for the baby itself, leaving it in the main thoroughfare where anyone could have hit the capsule, and she honestly didn’t think she’d done anything wrong!

Chocolate Drives All Of Us

, , , , | | Hopeless | May 22, 2018

I have had a very long, emotionally draining, trying day. I’ve also just stopped off at the supermarket and found some limited-edition and hard-to-get chocolate that I am excited to find. On my way home, I decide to stop at a famous chicken takeaway with a drive-thru, which I don’t normally stop at, but I want a pick me up.

The drive-thru line is long, but I’m happy to wait. When I finally arrive at the window, the drive-thru girl is very patient and wishes me apologies for the wait. I tell her it is of no worry and give her my best smile, because as a worker of retail I know the struggle. I ask for my order, with some extra seasoning on the fries if they are able.

Next thing I know, she has handed me extra items for my patience and understanding. She is highly sweet and thoroughly lovely throughout the transaction. When I arrive at the collection window, I’m still such in shock at the extra items she has given me, that I try to give the two limited chocolates to her and the other workers in thanks for her amazing attitude. They are so short-staffed, it’s the same girl!

She has even given me an entire packet of extra seasoning for my fries, more than requested.

She tells me there is no way she will accept the chocolate. I basically hand it to her and drive off, telling her there is no way I could not give it over as a “thank you.” She accepted it so humbly.

Easily the best drive-thru experience I ever had.

I made sure to leave an online review for her. True customer service exists and should be respected at all time!

Since then, I always recommend this worker at the drive-thru.

Expecting A Big Fat Apology

, , , , , , , | Related | January 12, 2018

(I’ve recently returned home to New Zealand from overseas travel. I worked in the UK in a pub for over a year and picked up heaps of skills and experience from the job. Now that I’m back home, I need to get a new job to get myself back on my feet. I’ve always had an ability to pull off job interviews well. Now, I’m a chunky girl, but not heinously overweight, and I carry myself well.)

Me: “I saw [Pub] has a sign out looking for staff, so I’m going to go drop CVs in and around them today.”

Mum: “Oh, no, you’re way too fat to work there. I’ve only seen skinny girls working at [Pub]. There’s no way they’ll hire you!”

(Understandably, I am upset, though not surprised as my mum has a massive hang up on my size and is constantly on at me. So, in spite, I apply, and I get called back the same afternoon. After a long, friendly, chatty interview with the manager I get offered the job on the spot. I head home, incredibly chuffed that I’ve not only got a job, but that it’s at the place I was deemed “too fat” to work at by my mum. As I walk through the door, Mum asks where I handed out my CVs today and I tell her, leaving [Pub] till last.)

Mum: “Oh, yeah, and have you heard anything back?”

Me: “Oh, I probably should have started with this, but yeah. I got a new job; I start tomorrow night.”

Mum: “Wow, really? Where?”

Me: “[Pub].”

(Needless to say, her face showed mixed emotions: pissed that I proved her wrong, but ultimately pleased that I was employed.)


Tired of being disrespected? We feel your pain. Find relief at our Antisocial collection in the NAR Store!

Enveloping An Attitude

, , , | Right | December 20, 2017

(I work part-time in a retail store. We are primarily a book store but also sell stationery, magazines and cards. At the moment we have a display of boxed Christmas cards at the front of the store.)

Customer: “Do you have any Christmas cards that will fit this envelope?” *holds up a bunch of very thin, very long envelopes*

Me: “We might do! Have a look around and see what we have.”

(The customer is looking at the cards on display and clearly didn’t hear me.)

Customer: *a moment later, already with attitude* “Well, do you?”

Me: *repeats, still cheerfully* “Yeah, we might do!”

Customer: *quite aggressively* “No I want you to come and HELP me find one.”

(I was just about to cash up one of the tills as it’s near closing.)

Me: “Oh, okay, sure.” *I walk around the counter and approach her* “May I have a look at the envelope size you have there?”

Customer: *hands me one of them* “See, because they’re all pre-paid for and I’ve written on them already.”

Me: “Okay, I see.” *I start comparing the envelope in my hand to cards in the boxed packs she’s looking at* “These ones here look like they might fit?”

Customer: “No, you have to take it out of the box to see for sure.”

(It sounds like a mild suggestion to me. I don’t oblige because we typically don’t open packaging unless they’re going to buy it. Sometimes we do make exceptions but these boxed packs of cards aren’t a simple open and close. I keep comparing the card sizes inside the boxes.)

Customer: “What about these ones? These are nice.” *hands me a pack*

Me: *checking* “Yeah, they look like they’d be a good fit!”

Customer: *snaps* “No, you have to take it out and LOOK!”

(I’m surprised, not really sure what to say for a moment because, again, we don’t typically do that. I open my mouth to speak… but apparently too late.)

Customer: *practically yelling now* “Look, if you don’t WANT to help me, I’ll just go somewhere else!” *snatches the envelope from my hand and storms off*

(I just let her go with a very bewildered “Okay…?” Who wants to serve a customer like that, anyway?)

Page 1/212
Next »