Limped Her Way Out Of That One

, , , , | Right | October 4, 2018

(I’m a few months pregnant, but we haven’t felt ready to begin telling people beyond a few close family and friends. I’ve been having some discomfort with my ligaments stretching, which on this particular day is causing pain whenever I step on my left leg.)

Customer #1: “I notice you’re limping! What happened?”

Me: *with a friendly, polite smile* “Oh, it’s personal, but thank you for your concern!”

Customer #1: “I see. Well, I think I’ll just take my business elsewhere.”

(Later…)

Customer #2: “Hey, you’ve got a bit of a limp there!”

Me: “Haha, yes, a bit.”

Customer #2: “What did you do to yourself?”

Me: “Oh, it’s rather personal, but thank you for your concern!”

Customer #2: “Well you don’t have to be rude about it.”

(Later…)

Customer #3: “You must have bad knees like me!”

Me: “Haha, something like that.”

Customer #3: *clearly probing* “Well, I hope that whatever you did to yourself gets better soon!” *waits expectantly*

Me: “Thank you very much.”

Customer #3: “Oh, for goodness’ sake, what did you do?”

Me: *still with a friendly, polite smile* “It’s a bit personal, but thank you for your concern!”

Customer #3: “Fine, if you don’t want to talk to me, we don’t have to talk. Just ring me through and be done with it.”

(Later…)

Customer #4: “So how come you’re limping?”

Me: “I stubbed my toe.”

Customer #4: “You poor thing! Well, thanks for your help!”

(I do not like lying. I shouldn’t have to. Nobody should feel entitled to information about a complete stranger’s health.)

PIN-Headed, Part 5

, , , , | Right | October 4, 2018

(At the store where I work, a few of the PIN-pad readers have broken and won’t show the asterisks when debit-users type in their PINs, but the PINs still go through. I have just explained this to a woman when this happens.)

Me: “Will that be debit or credit?”

Customer: “Debit.”

Me: “All right. Just go ahead and type in your PIN; the symbols won’t show up, but it is going through.”

(The customer starts typing in her PIN and then gets a very confused look on her face.)

Customer: “It’s not working.”

Me: “Oh, no, the symbols just aren’t showing it up, but it is working. I’ll just erase what you typed and—”

(The customer proceeds to cancel the transaction, so I run it through again.)

Me: “Okay, just go ahead and enter your PIN normally.”

(The customer starts typing in her PIN again and then starts to look upset again.)

Customer: “It’s not working!”

(I explained it to her again and restarted the process. This time, she picked up the pen used for signatures, and actually started trying to draw the numbers on the screen. Sadly, that wasn’t even the worst transaction of the day.)

Related:
PIN-Headed, Part 4
PIN-Headed, Part 3
PIN-Headed, Part 2

Flat Out Creepy

, , , , , | Right | October 3, 2018

(I’m ringing out one of the last customers of the day, a seemingly nice, older lady.)

Lady: *under her breath* “You’re so lucky.”

(I ignore the comment because it didn’t seem directed at me.)

Lady: *now whispering* “So sexy.”

(I’m now terrified and start to go a little faster through the transaction.)

Lady: “Mine are so flat.” *gestures to her chest* “You’re so lucky.”

(Our uniforms aren’t exactly figure flattering, but that’s how a lady, with no warning or context, complimented me on my breasts in the middle of my work day.)

This Is Why We’re In A Recession, Part 80

, , , , | Right | October 3, 2018

(A customer walks in with a bra that she wants to return. She ordered it from our website, and found out it was the wrong size when it arrived. She wants to exchange it for a different size. Previously, we were able to do exchanges in one transaction, meaning the credit for the returned item would go toward the new item. Recently, corporate changed some of our return policies, and one of them was that returns and purchases have to be done on separate transactions for loss prevention reasons.)

Me: “Okay. Just so you know, our return policy has changed, so we’re going to have to do two separate transactions today. First, I’ll give you your money back for the bra that doesn’t fit. It’ll be credited right back to the card you bought it with. Then, in the next transaction, I’ll ring up the new bra, and you’ll just pay the same amount that you paid for the returned bra.”

Customer: “No problem. Sounds good.”

(I process the return. When I ask her to hit “yes” on the PIN-pad to confirm that the amount she’s getting back is correct, she shakes her head and picks up the new bra.)

Customer: “No, this isn’t right. Did you forget that I wanted to buy this one?”

Me: “Well, like I said, we recently had some changes made to our return policy, so we have to do exchanges on two separate transactions. We give you your money back in one transaction, and then the new purchase in another transaction. I just gave you your money back for the bra that didn’t fit. Now, I can ring up your new bra, and you’ll pay exactly what you paid for the old one. It’s still an even exchange. Corporate just decided to add a step.”

Customer: *still visibly confused* “All right, if you say so.”

(I ring up the new bra and adjust the price so it’s the same as what she paid for the bra she just returned.)

Me: “That’ll be [price].”

Customer: “I don’t understand. You told me this would be an even exchange. Why am I being charged for this bra when I just returned the exact same one?”

Me: “I just gave you back your money for the first bra. The money you paid for it was refunded right back to your card. Even though it looks like you’re paying [price] for this bra, we’re only asking you to pay the exact amount you were just refunded.”

Customer: “So, you’re saying I don’t get my money back?”

(The customer’s friend, who came in with her and was looking around the boutique while I processed the exchange, overhears and tries to intervene on her behalf.)

Friend: “She already bought this bra. She just wants to swap it out for a different size. Why are you making her pay for it twice?”

Me: *ignoring the friend* “Corporate changed the rules, and we have to do exchanges on two separate transactions. Before, we could just give you back your money and ring up your new purchases in the same step. We can’t do that anymore. We have do returns and purchases in two separate steps. It can be confusing at first.”

Customer: “Yes, it’s very confusing. I just want my money back.”

Me: *pointing to her return receipt* “I just put the amount you paid for the bra that didn’t fit back onto the card you used to pay for it. The bra you’re replacing it with is the exact same price. In the end, your credit card balance will not change. Do you still want to purchase this bra?”

Customer: “Well, I guess I have to. I need a bra. You’re sure my credit card balance will be the same?”

Me: “Yes. It can take up to 48 hours for your refund to go through. If, two days from now, you check your credit card balance and you haven’t gotten your [refund amount] back, please call the customer service number at the bottom of your receipt and we can get it sorted out. But I can’t think of any reason why it wouldn’t go through.”

(The customer, clearly not satisfied with my explanation, thanked me and walked away. Her friend was loudly complaining about how we “made her buy the same bra twice,” and “wouldn’t give her her money back.” Later that week, a different lady came in with a return, which I processed. When we were done, she said she wanted to look around. She ended up buying some things, and after I was done ringing her items, she insisted that her total shouldn’t be so much because she wanted her refund credited toward her new purchase. Do people seriously not understand how credit cards work?)

Related:
This Is Why We’re In A Recession, Part 79
This Is Why We’re In A Recession, Part 78
This Is Why We’re In A Recession, Part 77

Sale Gone Stale

, , , , , | Right | October 3, 2018

(I work at a popular candle and fragrance store. I am helping a customer and her daughter with their products. Everything is going fine, and the mother is really polite, until it comes to checking out.)

Customer: “Oh! Do you have any coupons?”

Me: “You can always check your email or [Specific Website]. That’s the only one we accept.”

(We say this because other websites steal our coupons and change the sku for the customer’s transaction to come out as $0. I see that she starts Googling for coupons. She shows me one that I can’t accept.)

Me: “I’m sorry; I can’t take that one. We only accept your email, or [Specific Website].”

(She starts Googling again a few more times, and then gets frustrated at me for not taking other coupons I can’t accept, despite me repeating the only ones we do accept. She throws her bag of products onto the cash-wrap.)

Customer: *angrily* “Then never mind! Just ring my stuff up.”

(I just smile at her and ring all her things. I see that she is getting two large candles, but they’re not the ones for sale. I tell her her total. She looks on the screen to make sure everything is correct. Then she looks up at me.)

Customer: “Why am I paying $22.50 for each candle?!”

Me: “I’m sorry, but it’s the smaller candles for sale.”

(She pushes the candle towards me.)

Customer: “Take it off! I don’t want it!”

(I smiled at her and told her I would happily do that for her. Her daughter looked at me, embarrassed, and I just smiled at her. Her mom swiped her card and tried walking away. I told her that she had to answer a few questions. After she was done, she walked away angrily, leaving her receipt, her daughter, and her bag of products. She yelled for her daughter to grab her things as she walked out the door. A few weeks later, she came in again and didn’t make eye contact with me.)

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