A Fusing Of Japanese And American Parts

, , , , , | | Right | June 28, 2019

(I work for a company that sells power transformers to run US and Japanese appliances in Australia.)

Me: *answering phone* “Thank you for calling [Company]. How can I help you?”

Customer: “What are these fuses for that came with my transformer?”

Me: *slightly baffled at the question* “They’re spares in case the one in your transformer blows. It’s in the back by the power cord.”

Customer: “Oh, how will I know I need to replace the fuse?”

Me: “It won’t work.”

Customer: *laughs* “I should have figured that.”

Unfiltered Story #155119

, , | | Unfiltered | June 20, 2019

(I work for a large manchester store. Way up the back of the stop is a towel clearance table that almost always looks a mess because it’s full of odds and ends that are regularly scratched through by customers. I am currently sorting the lower shelf of this table, and am on my hands and knees, pulling unfolded towels out and stashing them on the floor next to me so I can refold them. There is quite a pile beginning to form. Despite this  a woman walks up to the table, walks over the heaping pile of towels, and then stands on my fingers.)
Me: Uh, excuse me, ma’am? You’re standing on my hand.
(The woman completely ignores me, despite the fact that she’s swaying about as her heel crushes my fingers.)
Me: Ma’am? I’m sorry, ma’am? You’re standing on my fingers – please, ma’am, I need you to –
(She’s still ignoring me, and I’m in quite a bit of pain. So I attempt to save my poor hand and try to shift them out from underneath her, all the while attempting to get her attention. She continues to ignore me, even as my voice gets more worried from how much pain I’m in.
Eventually I manage to yank my fingers free, but the woman loses her balance and topples backwards. I manage to help catch her, but before I can check if she’s okay she turns on me, fuming.
Customer: You tripped me, you b****!
Me: I’m sorry, but you were standing on my fingers, and I –
Customer: Do you really think that’s some excuse to kick my feet out from under me?! I will have your job for this!
Me: I’m sorry, but this is just a misunderstanding –
Customer: When a customer is standing on your hand, you suck it up and LET THEM STAND. ON. YOUR. HAND. I DON’T PAY YOUR WAGE SO YOU CAN WHINE ABOUT THE WAY I TREAT YOU.
(I’m baffled. I don’t even know what to say at this point, and can only stare as she turns tail and storms out of the store.)
Customer : YOU HAVE LOST A LOYAL CUSTOMER! AS IF YOU EVEN *NEED* FINGERS IN THIS DEAD END JOB!

Big Island, Small World

, , , , , , | | Related | May 28, 2019

(I’m on a bus trip around parts of South Australia’s wine region with 22 other young adults from my church from around Australia, only six of whom I know from Western Australia. Others are from Sydney, Melbourne, Queensland, and South Australia. It’s our first night, and we jump on our tour bus to go to dinner. I sit next to a young woman from Melbourne and we start chatting.)

New Friend: “Hey, I’m [New Friend]. I’m from Melbourne; where are you from?”

Me: “I’m [My Name]. I’m from Perth. I love Melbourne, especially the Dandenong Ranges where my Aunty [Aunt] lives. My Uncle [Uncle] lives somewhere there, too.”

(She gives me a quizzical look.)

New Friend: “What’s your uncle’s last name?”

Me: “[Last Name], why?”

(She starts laughing.)

New Friend: “Hello, cousin.”

Me: “Wait, what? Are you serious?”

New Friend: “Yep, your uncle’s wife, [Aunt], is my aunt.”

Me: “Holy crap, that’s so cool!”

(We all had a great time on the trip, and thanks to Facebook, my cousin and I are able to keep in touch. Gotta love random family encounters.)

She Has To Live Somewhere Else, But At Least She Will Be Living

, , , , , | Healthy Related | January 30, 2019

(I’m sitting in a doctor’s office waiting room with my five-year-old son for a routine checkup. In Australia, legally, you do not have to have your parents’ consent for doctor visits once you turn 16, at which point you can apply for your own medicare card, as well. A young girl around 16 or 17 marches through the door and walks up to the receptionist, followed by an older woman who turns out to be her mother. Her mother is WAILING at the top of her lungs, begging her daughter to stop, asking how she could do this to her, etc., in amongst just screaming randomly. Every kid in the practice bolts to their parents and the adults are left to just watch it all unfold.)

Teenage Girl: “Hello. I’m [Teenage Girl] and I’m seventeen and here for my own appointment.”

(Her mother increases her screeching, now sitting firmly in harpy territory.)

Mum: “I AM HER MOTHER AND I DO NOT CONSENT TO THIS.”

(The receptionist, to her credit, simply checks the young girl in, and she goes to sit down and wait. Her mother, still crying and shrieking, follows her and sits between her and another mum with a toddler who looks horrified.)

Mum: *through hiccups and tears* “Make sure you raise him right, but even if you raise him right, he’ll let some big corporation turn him against youuuu!

(The other mum gets called in for her appointment and makes a hasty getaway, leaving us to listen to the crazy banshee beg and plead and scream at her daughter not to do this. Honestly, at this point, I think the only thing that could cause this reaction would be an abortion, but ohhh, I was wrong. A very perplexed doctor calls the young girl’s name out, and she bolts into the room. Her mother tries to follow but is stopped by the doctor.)

Doctor: “Do you want your mother with you?”

Teenage Girl: “No.”

(This apparently kicks the crazy into overdrive. The mother starts yelling angrily now.)

Mum: “Well, after you get that poison injected into you, you are not coming home and shedding it all over your sisters! You can find somewhere else to live!”

(The mum made an exit and we all realised she was talking about VACCINES. When her daughter emerged from the room she apologised to all of us, and it looked like she’d been crying. A few people offered her tissues and told her she was a brave kid for standing her ground. She had a quiet talk with the receptionist, who called someone, and when I was leaving the receptionist said she’d called the girl’s father for her. Wherever you are, brave girl, I hope you had somewhere to live, and good on you for making the smart choice!)

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Helping Out All Two And A Half Of You

, , , , | Hopeless | November 30, 2018

(This happened years ago, way before ATMs had cardless cash. When I am five-and-a-half-months pregnant with our first child, my husband is transferred through work to a different state, away from all our friends and family. I’m not coping very well with the move. The Friday before he starts at the office, he takes me to the city sightseeing, to try to cheer me up. Before heading home, we go to an ATM to get money out. The ATM takes my husband’s card before showing an “out of order” message. I start to cry, knowing that we have little petrol in the car and not a lot of food at home, and that the bank will not be open until the Monday.)

Husband: *hugging me* “Hey, it’s okay. We have enough petrol to get home and me to work. There’s a [Bank] near the office; I’ll go there on my lunch, then get petrol. We have enough canned food until then; it won’t be gourmet, but it’s food. We’ll be okay!”

Me: *still crying* “I know, sorry. It’s these stupid hormones.”

(A gentleman in a suit, who has been waiting for a bus nearby, interrupts us.)

Gentleman: “Excuse me. I don’t mean to be rude, but I just saw what happened and overheard your conversation. Please take this.” *hands my husband $50*

Husband: “Thank you, anyway, sir, but we can’t accept this. We’ll be okay.”

Gentleman: “Please take it. Call it my good deed for the day. I can see your wife is pregnant, and the last thing she needs to be doing is worrying about running out of petrol or not eating properly. Pass it on to someone in need when you can.”

Me: “Thank you so much. We’ve moved from [City] for his work and don’t have anyone here. You don’t understand how much this means to me.”

Gentleman: “Glad I could help. Keep your chin up. Things will get better.”

Husband: “Thank you so much. Do you have a business card? I’d like to repay you.”

Gentleman: “Don’t worry about it; just pay it forward when you can. If you ever get into trouble again, go to [Church in the city] and ask for [Pastor]. He’ll help you.”

(The gentleman’s bus came at that point. He shook both our hands before leaving. His generosity meant we had good, healthy food and enough petrol for the weekend. We never did have to go to the church for help, and we never saw him again. Years later, I still tear up at his kindness.)

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