She’s Not In Controller Here

, , , , | Right | May 15, 2020

A “Karen” type woman — middle-aged with a permanent scowl etched on her face — comes up to the counter in a huff with her ten-year-old-looking son. She plops down an Xbox One controller on the counter, in its box, and forks over the receipt.

Customer: “I want to return it because it doesn’t work. I want my money back.”

Me: “Do you have a rewards account?”

She gives me her information and I pull up her account. As I look over her receipt, I notice that it is a new controller, it was not purchased under her account, the warranty was declined, and it is past the thirty-day exchange policy. I explain this to her.

Me: “The best I can do is run the controller through our test system, trade it in as a defective, and put the money towards a different controller, as is our store policy on such matters.”

She won’t accept this, and now I’ve got about five people in line waiting on me. My manager is out sick, so I call another store to see what their take is, already knowing what policy is, and the manager of that store tell me exactly that. When I tell her what the other store manager told me, she starts fuming.

Customer: “Get your manager!”

Me: “I am the manager on duty.”

Customer: “Get your manager on the phone!”

Me: “She can’t answer because she is on medical leave and currently in surgery.”

Customer: “Get the assistant manager on the phone!”

I go to the back room to call her. She tells me what I am doing is right, but if the customer simply won’t accept it to just refund it back to her as a store credit, technically breaking policy. I go back and say exactly that, but she is still fuming.

Customer: “I wanted the refund in cash! I won’t leave the store until I get it!”

Even under all the stress, I held my resolve. I was kind and courteous, but also firm on what I could and could not do. And when she stood there, holding up the line like a petulant child, I had had enough. I gave her her receipt and her gift card and told her that was all I was authorized to do.

Then, I called to the next customer behind her that I could help them. She gave me the death glare, and I looked her straight in the eyes as she was forced to move over for the other customer.

I never saw her or heard from her, and she didn’t even leave me a bad review!

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