Rule Of Dumb

, , , , , , | Working | May 25, 2018

(The store I work at is a one-register, one-person store. We count down our drawers and do shift change a half-hour or so before the next person gets there, so when they do, they can just clock in, and we can immediately clock out and go. We have recently switched over to new registers and a new system. One of the changes is that instead of logging in as “First Shift, Register 1,” etc., each employee has their own individual number with their name attached to it. We try for a while doing it the old way, counting the drawer before the next person gets there, but the boss is noticing some discrepancies on the shifts of those following a certain individual, [Coworker #1]. He makes the new rule that you must wait until the next person gets there to count down your drawer. Now, [Coworker #1] has gotten into the habit of starting to count the drawer when she sees my car enter the parking lot, so by the time I actually enter the building, take off my coat, and clock in, she’s already done counting and logged back in under MY number. This robs me of the ability to watch her count it down and/or recount the drawer myself if needed. This morning, upon entering the store, she is part way through counting the drawer.)

Me: “Please don’t log me in when you’re done. I prefer to do that myself.”

Coworker #1: “Um… Okay.”

Me: *as I’m clocking in* “So, just curious, why don’t you wait for me clock in before you start counting the drawer… like we’re supposed to?”

Coworker #1: “Because [Coworker #2] always makes me wait for ten minutes.”

(A customer enters the store and asks for a can of chew.)

Coworker #1: “It’ll be just a minute, sir.”

Me: “Well, I’m consistently five minutes early. And the whole point of waiting until the next person gets here is so there’s two sets of eyes on the money as it’s being counted.”

Coworker #1: “Um… Okay.”

(She finishes counting and logs out, grabs the can of chew the customer asked for and sets it on the counter.)

Me: “Good morning, sir. One moment, please.”

(I log in and quickly recount the drawer. Only off by less than a dollar, which is not a big deal.)

Me: “Thank you for your patience, sir. You caught us right at the ‘changing of the guard.’”

Customer: “No problem.”

(Meanwhile, [Coworker #1] quickly clocked out and scurried out the door, mumbling about how tired she was. I can appreciate wanting to get the hell out of dodge… but I don’t think she realized that she was the reason for the new rule in the first place.)

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