In Line And Out Of Line, Part 18

, , , , | Right | July 2, 2020

I am walking out of the cash office to put my cash drawer in the register. I have to recount it in front of a manager before I start my shift to make sure I have my required float. My cash light is off, signaling I’m not ready to accept customers yet.

A woman walks up with her young daughter — maybe ten — and places a greeting card on the belt.

Me: “I’m sorry, miss, I’m not ready to accept customers yet, as I have to still count my drawer. Cash #1 would be happy to help you.”

Mother: *To her daughter* “Now, honey, we have to go stand at the end of the line behind everyone. Now we’re last because this lady should have been ready to take us. We’re going to be late for Granny’s birthday because of this lady.”

Me: “I do apologize, miss. It should only take me a minute if you would rather wait?”

Mother: “No, it’s fine. You have just provided my daughter with a good lesson. When an employee is at work, they should be ready to serve at all times. Now you have shown her that stupid people like you are what’s wrong with the world, and you can’t do anything about stupid people making you late for things.”

The mother and daughter walk off into my coworker’s line — one customer deep — and huff and puff while I count my drawer. I hear the mother complain to my coworker about how I’m slow and should really have been ready to serve her immediately.

Coworker: “We are all required to count our drawers and enter it into the system before taking on any customers, and her shift hasn’t even started yet, so she is well within company policy to make sure everything adds up before taking on any customers.”

The mother has been served and starts heading past my register. She stops and says to her daughter:

Mother: “When Granny gets upset that we’re late, we can come back and thank this lady for ruining everything.”

Just as she has finished berating me, I am done counting and flip my cash light on and ask to take the next customer in line.

Daughter: *To her mother* “See mommy? She’s open now. Didn’t Granny say, ‘If you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all, to you when you were a little girl like me? You called that lady stupid and I think she’s smart.”

The mother turned beet red and hurried out the door.

Related:
In Line And Out Of Line, Part 17

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Wordless Parenting

, , , , | Right | July 1, 2020

I’m shopping in a discount store when a little boy about three years old runs past me screaming. He starts circling the racks of clothes shouting nonsense words while his mother, who is about three racks away, lazily calls for him to stop once or twice.

After a while, I am at the cash register, and as I am waiting for my credit card to go through, the cashier starts looking towards the door, which I can’t see because of the other cash register.

The cashier turns to two ladies by the door.

Cashier: “Excuse me, does he belong to you?”

The two ladies look and say no. Suddenly, the cashier takes off from behind the counter and out of the store. She comes back in holding the hand of the little boy who was running around earlier. 

Cashier: “Sweetie, you can’t go outside without your mommy or daddy. You could get hurt! Do you know where your mommy or daddy are?”

The child’s mother then comes walking casually along the aisle towards the door, as if nothing had happened. When the child sees her, he again starts screaming and tries to take off through the door. The mother takes his hand from the cashier and leads him out of the store without a word. The cashier comes back to the register.

Cashier: “I’m so sorry about that. Here’s your receipt.”

Me: “Are you kidding? You shouldn’t be apologizing to me; that mother should have been apologizing to you! Good for you.”

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Not Very Closed-Minded, Part 35

, , , , , | Right | July 1, 2020

It’s 10:10 pm, and I’m managing a fast food restaurant that closes at 10:00 pm. A few minutes ago, I locked all the doors and turned off all the exterior lights, the road sign, the dining room, and the drive-up menu board.

A car pulls on the lot. A customer gets out of her car, walks up to the vestibule-type entry, yanks on the door, and finds it locked. She walks to the other side of the vestibule, yanks on that door, and finds it locked. She walks around the building, to the door on the other side and — you guessed it — finds it locked. 

She then proceeds to walk up to the drive-up window, bangs on it until I come over, and then asks, “Are you open?”

Related:
Not Very Closed Minded, Part 34
Not Very Closed Minded, Part 33
Not Very Closed Minded, Part 32
Not Very Closed Minded, Part 31
Not Very Closed Minded, Part 30

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Sinfully Delicious, Part 7

, , , | Right | July 1, 2020

We are required to offer confectionery to all our customers.

Me: “Can I also tempt you with any half-price sweets or chocolates?”

Customer: “Oooh, you’re always trying to tempt us! You’re worse than Satan!”

Me: “That’s a little unfair! I like to think we’re about level.”

Related:
Sinfully Delicious, Part 6
Sinfully Delicious, Part 5
Sinfully Delicious, Part 4
Sinfully Delicious, Part 3

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The Drive To Anger

, , , | Right | July 1, 2020

A customer of ours who we hardly ever hear from, who is about seventy years old, gives us a call.

Me: “[Insurance Company], this is [My Name]; how may I help you?”

Customer: “Hi, this is [Customer]. I was in the hospital recently and I am now in rehab. I know a while back someone told me that [Granddaughter] is not allowed to drive my car. She has her own insurance and lives elsewhere but is driving me occasionally now since I am unable to drive while in rehab. Is that right?”

Me: “Hmm, well, I see that she is listed in the household but is not assigned to your car. Let me double-check with a team member and I will get back to you within a few minutes, is that okay?”

Customer: *A little miffed* “All right, that’s fine.”

I find a note from two years ago that the customer did, in fact, sign a form that means the granddaughter is not allowed to drive her car due to her terrible driving record. This also means that in the event of a claim where the granddaughter happens to be the driver, our company could deny coverage.

Me: “Hello, [Customer]? This is [My Name] from [Insurance Company] again. I did some research, and back in September of 2011, you signed a form that prevents us from assigning [Granddaughter] to your car. But, that doesn’t mean she can’t drive you around in her own vehicle.”

Customer: “What? That’s not what I asked! Why does her car have anything to do with my insurance?!”

Me: “I’m sorry, ma’am. I am not saying that her car is insured here; I am just saying that if she has to drive you in her car, that is perfectly fine. But if she drives you in your car, then there could be a denial in coverage if something were to happen because you signed that form two years ago.”

Customer: “All you had to do was tell me that she still isn’t allowed to drive my car. You didn’t have to go into when I signed something and stuff about her car.”

Me: “O-okay, ma’am. Well, you were correct; she is still not allowed to drive your car.”

Customer: *Huffs* “Thank you.”

Me: “You’re welcome, goodbye—”

Customers: *Muffles* “Stupid b****.” *Hangs up”

I guess sometimes it’s best not to go into greater detail?

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