No Holiday From Entitlement

, , , , | Right | March 17, 2020

(I am a part-time waitress. Customers often claim that the fine print is too small when we can’t honor their requests, but they still accept that we can’t, though they don’t look happy. One day, one particular customer decides to challenge the fine print. Take note that today is a replacement holiday, where the day before is a public holiday that falls on a Sunday, thus making the next day a Monday a replacement public holiday.)

Customer: “I would like to use this coupon.”

Me: “I’m sorry, but this coupon cannot be used on weekends or a public holiday.”

Customer: “But today isn’t a public holiday.”

(In my mind I keep thinking, “Yeah, if it’s not, then why are you here instead of working?” but I try my best to maintain my composure.)

Me: “Today is a replacement public holiday, and based on our policy, we can’t accept any coupons on replacement, as well. I—”

Customer: “GET ME YOUR MANAGER, NOW!”

(I wordlessly nod and inform my manager. She goes and explains the same thing to the customer, but she gets really mad and starts screaming.)

Customer: “Why can’t I use it? Your fine print didn’t say I can’t use it on a replacement; today is just a replacement! You’d better honor this as I am in a rush to watch [Popular Kid’s Movie]! You’d better accept this, now!”

(I still don’t understand how these kinds of people can reproduce and act like this in front of their young children, their spouses saying nothing. Not to mention that to be able to dine in our restaurant, it means you are considered the wealthy ones. In the end, my manager had to honour the coupon after getting top management’s approval. That petty customer didn’t even tip anything after we bent the rules.)

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