Right Working Romantic Related Learning Friendly Healthy Legal Inspirational Unfiltered

It’s Breast Not To Make Things Worse

, , , , , , , | Healthy | November 28, 2022

I’m a new mom. My son wouldn’t breastfeed and I asked for help at the hospital. They asked what the problem was and whether there was any milk. I told them countless times that there was plenty of milk; my son just wasn’t capable of getting it out.

They decided that I should pump some to give to him.

Nurse: “Here: you put one cup on each breast and then just let the pump work. Don’t worry if there are only a few drops; we’ll give him a substitute if there isn’t enough. We only need a very small cup of milk for him.”

Me: “Don’t worry; I think it’ll be enough.”

Nurse: “I’ll prepare some substitute, just in case.”

We started the pump. However, the nurse did not show us how to stop it or say how much we should pump. My husband and I saw the bottle filling up, so eventually, my husband went to find the nurse.

She came back with a small cup of substitute milk.

Nurse: “Hello! How is it going?”

Me: “How long should I keep going?”

Nurse: “Oh, well, the more we get out, the better. We’ll give him this in the meantime.”

Me: “We might need a new bottle soon, then.”

Then, she actually looked down to see the milk. Her jaw dropped and her face went pale.

Nurse: “We won’t need this.”

She stopped the pumping and explained that she’d save the milk, in case it was needed later.

My milk production did cause problems. My son learned to drink properly, and he loved it overflowing — even when he was full, he would just drink and then spit the milk out, just to get the taste — so there was no problem there any longer. However, no protection helped against my occasional (more to say constant) flow of extra milk. I ended up walking around with cups on each breast, made to gather up the extra milk, and I had to empty them regularly throughout the day.

We also bought a new sheet for the bed so the milk wouldn’t seep through to the mattress. I ended up sleeping in puddles of milk, even though I had towels to suck it up. I even ended up in the hospital due to milk engorgement.

Me: “There is milk coming out all the time. How can some of it be stuck?”

Doctor: “Unfortunately, it happens. You should try to have your son drink more if possible.”

Me: “I’ve heard it helps to pump milk. Should I get a pump?”

Doctor: “Usually, I would say yes, but it has a tendency to make the production higher, and in your case, high production is what causes the problem.”

Since then, I’ve had countless people tell me I should give away all the milk I gather up, as there are so many who don’t make enough for their babies. At first, I was surprised the doctor hadn’t told me about it, but it became clearer when it turned out that such milk had to be pumped, not just gathered out of health regulations.

I explained this many times, but the typical conversation went like this:

Person: “Why do you have cups on your breasts?”

I’d explain my high milk production.

Person: “You should give it away; there are many less fortunate people who don’t get enough.”

Me: “I can’t. I have to pump it out, and that would cause my production to get even higher. I’ve already ended up in the hospital for it.”

Person: “I still think you should. There are so many who can’t get enough milk; you should help them since you don’t have problems with it.”

Me: “But I have problems. I just have a problem with too much milk, so I can’t risk getting even more.”

Person: “Look, there are many people who can’t get enough! You shouldn’t whine because you get a lot; that is a blessing!”

Even when I explain why it is a problem, they think I’m just whining about having too much, which I should apparently be happy about. They can come back when they’ve tried bathing in milk every night and ended up in the hospital for days with pain, for which the best treatment is a baby painfully sucking from the place that hurts.

Question of the Week

Has a customer ever tried to cross you and lived to regret it? What happened?

I have a story to share!