Historically, You Shouldn’t Accept Challenges

, , , , | Learning | October 20, 2019

(It’s the first class of term and the lecturer is going over course requirements, end-of-term exam, etc. This is history, my favourite topic ever, and the lecturer and I know each other well from previous classes and are on very good terms. He is also lenient to a fault.)

Me: “So, those worksheets that are requirements. How many do we have to hand in?”

Lecturer: “If you hand in the majority, you’re fine.”

Me: “Right, and what do you mean by ‘majority’? Like, let’s say there’s ten; how many out of ten do we have to hand in?”

(I am expecting something like eight or nine.)

Lecturer: “Oh, let’s say… six out of ten.”

Me: *incredulous and mock-accusingly* “Seriously?! You are far too nice!”

Lecturer: “All right, you, and only you will have to hand in every single one!”

Me: *laughing* “Challenge accepted!”

(Later in the same class:)

Student: “Wait, there’s an exam? I thought it was a paper!”

Lecturer: “No, it’s definitely an exam, because I was very annoyed at having to make an exam.”

Everyone: *various noises of relief*

Me: “Am I the only one who would actually prefer a paper?”

Lecturer: “Yes. Yes, you are.”

Me: “Bummer.”

Lecturer: “All right, so, you alone will have to write a paper!”

(Later still. The question is how many languages were spoken in the British Isles during the early Middle Ages, c. 600 AD.)

Me: “Well, it really depends on what you define as ‘language.’”

Lecturer: “That’s two papers for you now!”

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