Her Attitude Is Right On The Money

| Newcastle, NSW, Australia | Right | February 21, 2013

(It is late at night. A young (early twenties) female in pyjamas and her husband approach the service desk. My coworker and I have had a horrible shift.)

Coworker: *depressed* “Hi, how can I help?”

Girl: “Oh, um hi. My husband and I just found this in your produce section and wanted to turn this in.” *produces $20 bill*

Coworker: “Sorry, what?”

Girl: “Oh, I just know I’d feel terrible if I lost money. And it might belong to someone who really needs it.”

Coworker: “You found this money and you want to turn it in?”

Girl: *grins and nods*

(My coworker calls me to bring the incident book over.)

Coworker: “You know, I’ve worked here for fifteen years and not once has anyone handed money over! Especially just a bill, not in a wallet or anything! You’ve made my night, young lady!”

(The girl is visibly beaming at this stage. We take her details and explain our policy states that if its not claimed in 30 days, we’ll contact her and she can have it. Sure enough, on the exact thirtieth day, my coworker rings the girl to tell her it’s hers. We still talk about the generous and honest young girl when we are having bad days!)

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  • Vira Vandom

    I honestly don’t see a point in turning in money by itself; it’s not like it has a photo ID attached to it, plus anybody could walk up later and claim that it’s theirs if they overheard the conversation earlier.

    • Natalie

      If I found $5 (in a store) I may just keep it. If it was like $300, I would feel so guilty, because someone may honestly ask about it. Plus AP usually will see who dropped it, that way the correct person will pick it up. Now, if I found $50 in the street, that’s fair game.