Dealt With That Ultra Smoothly

, , , , , | Right | February 22, 2018

(We’re a trade-oriented store, so we do not sell many paints. What we do, I’ve come to learn rather well.)

Customer: “Excuse me, do you sell [Masonry Paint Brand]?”

Me: “We sure do; in fact, there’s a stack on display on the shop floor with all the SKUs we have.”

(I lead him to it, and show him the ones we have.)

Customer: “I don’t want ‘ultra smooth,’ I want ‘smooth.'”

Me: “We don’t have one labelled ‘smooth,’ just ‘ultra smooth’ and ‘fine textured,’ which effectively has sand mixed into it.”

Customer: “I need ‘smooth.’ ‘Ultra smooth’ is too thin!”

Me: “Sir! I am telling you that we do not carry a [Brand] marked as ‘smooth,’ just ‘ultra smooth’ or ‘fine textured.'”

(This goes back and forth four more times, with me showing on our website. He goes off to our competitor, and I go and get a drink, when I realise something. About ten minutes later, he comes back.)

Customer: “Your competitor is not only clueless, but he is demanding much more for the same thing. It’s not what I want, but I’ll take the ‘ultra smooth’ in white.”

Me: “Sir, I’ve been thinking about it, and if you want something to last, thinner paint can ultimately prove better.”

Customer: “What do you mean?”

Me: “The problem with thicker paint is that air bubbles can be trapped inside it. If it dries with these bubbles in, you get a weaker finish structurally than a solid mass, just like with plaster inside your home.”

Customer: “You are a clever girl!”

(He was much happier about the “ultra smooth” after that.)

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