Category: Time

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If Only They Could Monitor Their Own Behavior

| Baltimore, MD, USA | Bad Behavior, Technology, Time

(I am in line at a popular electronics store to pick up my laptop I had purchased a few days prior. At this particular store, they advise you to make an appointment to avoid unpredictable wait times.)

Employee: *looking at me* “Hi, ma’am. Do you have an appointment?”

Me: “Yes, my appointment is at 1:30 under [My Name]. I am here to pick up my laptop I purchased the other day.”

Employee: “Okay, thanks. Hold on one moment please and I will go back and get your laptop.”

(An elderly couple walk in each holding a large computer monitor. The couple pushes me aside and sets the monitors on the counter. Not wanting to be rude, I quietly move aside.)

Old Woman: “We’re here to drop off these monitors. They need to be fixed.”

Employee: “Okay, ma’am. Did you have an appointment?”

Old Woman: “An appointment?”

Employee: “Yes, we recommend making appointments to help better serve our customers. It is not required, but recommended because wait times can vary to five minutes to a couple of hours.”

Old Woman: “No, I don’t have an appointment. I just want to drop these things off.”

Employee: “I’d be more than happy to help you, ma’am. However, I was in the middle of assisting another customer. She had an appointment so I have to help her first. You can take a seat over there and the wait time right now is twenty minutes.”

Old Woman: “TWENTY MINUTES?! That won’t do! We have a movie to catch!”

Employee: “I apologize, ma’am, but like I said, I need to assist customers with appointments first. You’re more than welcome to wait twenty minutes or I would be happy to schedule you an appointment for later.”

Old Woman: “That’s ridiculous! I’m not waiting twenty minutes. We already drove all the way here! Can’t I just leave these here with you and pick them up later?”

Employee: “Sorry, ma’am, but I just can’t let you leave these here.”

Old Woman: “Well, can’t I just sign some paper or something saying I’m leaving it here?”

Employee: “Yes, that’s what we require. We also would need to know the issues you are having with the monitors but like I said, I can’t allow you to cut in front of customers with appointments. I was already in the middle of helping this young lady–” *gestures towards me* “–and like I said she has an appointment. So you can either wait or schedule an appointment for later.”

(After watching this go on for a few minutes, I had decided I’d let the elder couple have my appointment as I didn’t have anything else to do that day and twenty minutes really wasn’t long.)

Me: “Excus—” *gets cut off*

Old Woman: “THIS IS RIDICULOUS! F*** THIS! I DIDN’T WANT TO COME TO THIS PIECE OF S*** STORE ANYWAY! [Husband], LET’S GO!”

(She snatches the computer monitor up, still going off and making a scene. Her husband takes the other monitor and without a word, follows his wife. The employee apologizes again to the man who rudely dismisses him.)

Employee: “I’m sorry about that.”

Me: “That’s okay; I work in the restaurant business where I have to deal with customers like that on a daily basis. I was about to just offer her my appointment until she made that big scene and started cursing.”

(Moral of the story: If that woman had handled herself differently and treated others with respect, her computer monitors would be fixed right now.)

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Not Very Closed Minded, Part 16

| East Lansing, MI, USA | Bad Behavior, Time

(The grocery store I work for has just closed its doors for good, and I am helping a small handful of my employees pack up items and clean up. For the past month and a half, there have been signs posted all over the store, at eye level, telling shoppers that the store would be closing. Most of the shelves are completely bare once the store is finally closed, and the front doors are shut off and closed, but not locked as we did need a way to get in and out of the building. My managers are out doing the final bank run, when a gentleman pushes past the doors, grabs a cart and proceeds to walk aimlessly around the store, weaving around large piles of boxes and empty displays. Everyone notices and proceeds to stop and stare at the man, without approaching him or notifying him that the store is closed. I finally decide to step up to him.)

Me: “Um… sir? I’m sorry, but the store closed on [Date].”

Customer: “Really? I don’t see any signs! I just want to do a bit of shopping.”

Me: “Yes, we have signs posted every five feet, at eye level, and as you can see, most of our shelves are completely bare. Not only that, none of our registers are on, nor do we have money to give you change if you decided to pay cash for whatever groceries you do happen to find.”

Customer: “Oh, well, I was wondering why your store was so bare. Would you mind if I take a look around anyway?”

Me: “The store is closed, sir. Of course I mind. There’s nothing here for you to see except a bunch of empty shelves, and even if you did find something, you can’t buy it, nor can you take it with you! Please leave!”

Customer: “Fine. You didn’t have to be so rude! Now I know why this place is closing!”

Me: “It’s closed already, sir. Have a good day.”

(The gentleman left his cart in the middle of the store and walked out. Everyone was left scratching their head by the end of that ordeal.)

Related:
Not Very Closed Minded, Part 15
Not Very Closed Minded, Part 14
Not Very Closed Minded, Part 13

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Diapathetic

| AB, Canada | Family & Kids, Food & Drink, Health & Body, Time

(I’m the head hostess on staff at an up-scale restaurant on a very busy Friday night. It’s not long before the restaurant is packed with customers waiting for tables. The hostesses are located at a desk directly in front of the front doors where patrons check in and get a pager, which is customary for any restaurant with high wait times. An angry female customer approaches our desk in the middle of the dinner rush. There is a long line of people waiting to check in.)

Customer: “How much longer is it going to be?! We’ve been waiting forty-five minutes!”

Coworker: “I’m sorry, ma’am. May I have your name or pager number so I can check where you are on the list?”

Customer: “What pager number? I never gave you my name and we never got a pager!”

Coworker: *recognizing customer* “Oh… uh…”

Me: “I apologize for the misunderstanding, ma’am. Did you check in with the girls here when you arrived?”

Customer: “Well, yeah! I asked if tables were available and they said there was a wait! Nobody told me I had to give my name! My children are starving!”

Coworker: “I’m sorry. I would have gotten your information, but you walked away when I informed you of our hour-long wait—”

Customer: “Well, this is ridiculous. We’ve been standing right over there watching you for the past hour! My son is diabetic!”

Me: “Again, I apologize for the miscommunication. Perhaps if you have a small snack for your son to tide him over, we can get you in as soon as possible.”

Customer: “What?! I don’t just carry food around with me! Can’t you bring him something from the kitchen?!”

(We got them in at the next available table, if only to make her go away!)