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Category: Technology

The realm of Technical Support is there to provide expert assistance to those who are not so tech-savvy. Although they still expect you to know what a computer is, and how to turn it on, and to know that you can’t ‘fix the internet’ because it isn’t pretty enough. You have been warned…

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Unable To Provide Console-ing Advice

| Kent, England, UK | Crazy Requests, Technology

(I work as a sales assistant for a popular video game retailer, and part of what we do as a company is trade in old consoles and games for cash or credit. In order for us to trade them in, they need to be in a sellable condition with all parts present.)

Customer: “Hi, we’re looking to trade in our [Console #1].”

Me: “Sure thing, I’ll just get everything out to test it.”

(Upon taking the console out of the bag it was presented to me in, I untangle the cables to find out that they’re missing an AV cable.)

Me: “Do you have an AV cable or HDMI cable with you as well?”

Customer: “No? Why would I need that?”

Me: “Well, in order to proceed with the transaction I need to test the console, which I can’t do without an AV or HDMI cable.”

Customer: “That’s ridiculous. Why can’t you just use one of your cables? You must have hundreds.”

Me: “We can’t use other cables because we also need to sell the console with a connecting cable for the TV. Every console is sold with an AV cable, so we need to trade every console in with one.”

Customer: “But I had to buy a HDMI cable separately when I bought the console!”

Me: “Yes, but the AV cable should have come with it. You can either find it at home or buy one from us and take the value off your trade-in.”

Customer: “That’s absolutely disgraceful! Just take the console without the damn AV cable.”

Customer’s Wife: “I had the exact same problem when I came to trade in [Child]’s [Console #2]! This is not acceptable.”

Me: “A [Console #2] is different as it is a handheld console. Every non-handheld console is sold with a connecting cable to connect it to a TV. You can buy one today or I cannot trade in your console.”

Customer: “In that case I’ll take my business elsewhere!”

(The couple stormed out with their console and headed to a rival store. About 30 minutes later I saw them walk past our store, Console #1 and all.)

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Email Fail, Part 9

| Canada | Crazy Requests, Extra Stupid, Technology

Me: “Hello! You’ve reached [Company]. How can I help you today!”

Customer: “This is an outrage! I received your coupon email, but it won’t work on your site!”

Me: “Okay, could I please have the coupon code to check it?”

Customer: “Which coupon code? I have nothing like that!”

Me: “Oh, I thought you said you had received an email. Wasn’t there a coupon code there?”

Customer: “You mean I have to READ the email?!”

Related:
Email Fail, Part 8
Email Fail, Part 7
Email Fail, Part 6

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Refunder Blunder, Part 25

| Canada | At The Checkout, Crazy Requests, Technology

Customer: “I bought this flash drive a few months ago and it doesn’t work in my computer!”

(The customer had the receipt and the packaging for it still, so I decided to give her store credit.)

Me: “Okay, I can return it for you, but since it’s over our return policy, I can only give you store credit.”

Customer: “That’s fine; I’m going to get a new one anyway.”

Me: “Okay, great.”

(I start the return on the defective flash drive and then go to put it in its respective cupboard.)

Customer: “What are you doing?”

Me: “Um, I’m putting it in the defective items cupboard.”

Customer: “No, I’ll need that back.”

Me: “But I’m giving you store credit for it.”

Customer: “Yes and I’m going to buy a new flash drive with it, but I need that back.”

Me: “I can’t give you money for it if you’re keeping it.”

Customer: “But it doesn’t work!”

Me: “Then why do you want it?”

Customer: “Because it works on my work computer!”

Me: “Oh… that’s strange.”

Customer: “Well, I can’t let you take it.”

Me: “Then I can’t give you store credit for it.”

Related:
Refunder Blunder, Part 24
Refunder Blunder, Part 23
Refunder Blunder, Part 22

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This Is Beeping Bad Service

| PA, USA | Crazy Requests, Technology

(I work for a popular clothing retail company. Our register area has sensors on them that beep constantly when an item is near it that still has a security tag attached. While annoying, it pales in comparison to the non-stop comments from other customers.)

Customer: “What is that sound?”

Coworker: *explains what the beeping is*

Customer: *suddenly upset* “That’s so insensitive to the customer! We shouldn’t have to listen to that! It’s horrible customer service!”

Me: “Actually, ma’am, the beeping keeps us from forgetting to take any sensors off. I know it can be annoying, but it’s so we can provide the best customer service for you.”

Customer: “No, it’s bad customer service! I demand you turn it off now!”

Coworker: “I’m sorry. We can’t do that. There’s no switch to turn it off.”

Customer: “Then break it!”

(We refused to do that as well. The customer paid and walked out in a huff, promising to never shop with us again. I sure hope she’s a woman of her word.)

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Knows Zip About Phone Numbers

| NY, USA | At The Checkout, Technology

(This happens once per week: We have a store discount that customers can activate by entering a phone number into the card reader while their purchase is being rung up. The machine’s screen clearly reads ‘ENTER PHONE NUMBER ###-###-####’ right above the keyboard. I’m serving an older woman at my register and see her enter a couple numbers into the machine. It then loudly beeps, letting me know that something went wrong.)

Customer: “Did it go through?”

Me: “Sorry, but it looks like you forgot to put your area code in first. You can try it again now.”

(She again enters only seven digits, rather than the full phone number of ten digits, and the machine again beeps.)

Me: “Ma’am, please make sure that you’re entering your full phone number in. The area code needs to go first.”

Customer: “Oh, okay!”

(I watch her and see that, this time, she enters her zip code into the machine instead. It again beeps when she tries to submit it.)

Customer: “So did it go through now?”

Me: “No, I’m sorry; it looks like you tried to enter your zip code. What you need to type in is your phone number. Just make sure that you add the area code first.”

Customer: “The area code?”

Me: “Yes, ma’am, enter the area code and then the rest of your phone number. If you live around here, the area code is ‘555,’ so just type that in first.”

(She again enters in her zip code.)

Me: “No, I’m sorry, the machine needs your phone number.”

Customer: “But you said area code!”

(This goes back and forth even longer. I’m unfortunately not allowed to enter a customer’s information into the system for them, so we’re stuck in this loop until the customer finally gives up and allows me to skip past the discount option. As she’s leaving, the customer loudly mutters:)

Customer: “Ugh, this is why I don’t bother with computers. They never work right.”

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